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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes that’s right, there could be a fishery on wild coho this fall/winter at Siltcoos and Tahkenitch lakes between October 1rst and December 31rst. The original proposal was for Tenmile Lake also but I believe a little political backlash from some Tenmile Lake’s property owners killed that.

The proposal for the fisheries is biologically sound as you will see in the NOAA report up for public review currently. I endorsed this proposal at a commission meeting back in March of this year based on the stat's and science I have been following on our coastal wild coho in the lake systems and other coastal streams.

As you can see in the NOAA public review draft the proposed fishery would be closely monitored and if the modest acceptable harvest of coho is being reached during the time period the fishery would be closed. This fishery would not affect any other coastal coho stocks along the Oregon coast.

I would encourage you to read the NOAA public review draft and if you think this would be a good opportunity for fishermen to follow through and write:
Lance Kruzic
Salmon Recovery Division
2900 N.W. Stewart Parkway
Roseburg, OR 97470
email: [email protected]
phone: 541/957-3381
fax: 541/957-3386

The report is located here:

http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/1fmep/fmepsbmt.htm


My presentation to the commission back in March this year:


Good afternoon,

My name is Dan Dettmann and my address is: Po Box 962, Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341. I am a sport fisherman and a wholesale tackle manufacturer, and write some articles for a local newspaper.
I appreciate the opportunity to speak to you this afternoon.

I am here today to talk about the possibility of a wild coho harvest this fall in Siltcoos, Tahkenitch & Tenmile Lakes. According to a recent article in the Oregonian, ODFW biologists think those coho stocks are doing well enough to justify a modest sport consumptive harvest. I understand the dept. and the commission will deal with the proposal at a later meeting. I want to take the opportunity to strongly endorse their proposal while you are here in Newport.

I am a fisherman with my favorite fishery being fall fishing for coho salmon. Due to the limited fisheries on the Oregon Coast Rivers for coho, I spend most of my time chasing coho’s in SW Washington.

I have been an out spoken wild coho advocate for the past nine years since I have been seeking answers from ODFW & WDFW biologist and on the web.

I have observed over the years how the coastal lakes have been holding there own even during the severe El ‘Nino years of the early and mid 90’s and the devastating ’96 flood.

I would agree with the biologist assessments that a small modest harvest that is biologically sound would be a great benefit to sports fishermen. Given this day and age where fisheries and elbow room are limited on the rivers, I feel it would create beneficial opportunities to sports fishermen.
 

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I have heard that Siltcoos Lake was once the most healthy coho run in the state, before development and warm water fish.

That lake was one huge nursery for the young after they migrated out of their streams. Not unlike sockeye use a lake in northern locations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello Dave. Hope to fish with you on the Cowlitz this year on your many days off. :grin:

I wasn't aware of Siltcoos once being the most healthy but that doesn't surprise me much because as you said they and the other lakes are excellent rearing habitat for coho as it is in the sockeye senario. There is a lot of competition and predation on the wild coho with the illegal introduction of all the warm water species that have been put into these lakes. Yellow perch, brown bullhead catfish, bluegill, largemouth bass and more recently crappie. Did I miss any? But the populations have been stable and healthy considering.

I believe the habitat is in good shape. These fish didn't take the big hit the rest of the wild coho did coast wide from the devestating February '96 flood I'm sure because of the lakes for them to seek refuge during that flood.

Dan
 

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And isn't the state record coho from Siltcoos? I think it is.

If they are in healthy shape it's the same as fishing for wild fall chinook.
 

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Oh, that's just great! The one place the wife and I go to relax and get away from the hubub of the salmon/steelhead big river fisherys and now your telling me that soon i'll have to deal with the same bunch of rabid salmo fishermen I've been dealing with since the end of February??? (Myself included of course!)

Just kidding.... I think.

We've been going to Siltcoos this time of year since just before they closed the lake to the take of coho. Last year on our trip we caught (and released carefuly as possible) more of what I beleive to be coho smolts than ever before, while fishing for perch. One thing that is disturbing though is that last year we also caught more pike minnows than the two previous years, and I don't beleive we caught pike minnow in there three years and more ago. They weren't very big, maybe 6" tops.

Smj
 

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As you know smj, Siltcoos is a big lake. In previous years most of the coho trollers stayed close to the outlet...although not all do. I used to live on the hill overlooking the lake and hunted ducks there a lot...and I remember one day while the coho fishery was on...three guys in a pontoon party-type boat trolled right past the edge of my decoy spread...guess my camo was so good they couldn't see me. :hoboy:

As for ********* (NPM is a PC term and is not in my vocabulary :wink: ), I wouldn't worry too much. They are a problem in the unnatural reservoir conditions on the Columbia River...but Siltcoos Lk always had *********, always will, and there probably aren't any more now than there ever were. :whazzup:
 
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