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I was fortunate enough to grow up down on the Umpqua and even though my dad originally got me into fishing, he wasn't fanatical about it, and I wouldn't say he was my fishing mentor. In junior high a few friends and I met a man named Ron Beamer, AKA "the Beam". Having no kids of his own at the time, Beam adopted us, not only showing us how to catch salmon and steelhead, but shad and half-pounders, and even bullhead when the rivers were blown - any reason to be on the water.

Beam showed a great deal of trust with us kids, even at our young age. He owned a number of North River sleds over the years and often kept a boat tied up down at the river. Over time he began letting us take it out on our own to motor down to a good shad hole, or up to fish spinners for springers. I can recall the faces of many of Beam's old fishing pals as we motored his boat up into position in a hog line for springers - they wondered if he'd lost his mind letting these punk junior high kids use his sled. Of course their eyes widened further when we started catching fish!

There were many great trips with Beam, most on the Umpqua, but sometimes to Crane Prairie for big rainbows or brookies, or one of his favorite fall trips, to the Rogue for half-pounders. I run into Beam seldomly these days, and don't know that he fishes as much as he used to. I'll never know the reason he befriended us kids and trusted us the way he did, but I'm forever grateful. My life-long passion for fishing and spending time on the water grew out of those experiences with Beam, and I hope to be able to provide the same experience to kids in the future. We should all be so lucky.
Chris
 

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For me, it was my neighbor Ford Tracey, when I was a teenager. My grandfather first got me into fishing - put the spark in me if you will. But Ford, he mentored me. He let me mow his lawn all winter so I would have money for fishing tackle - we would order from Herder's (sp?) catalog.

When I was 15 and had my permit, he taught me to back the trailer, launch the boat - it was key for him because his legs had gone. We went out every weekend - trolling for rainbows, kokanee and fishing for bluegill in California's Sierra Nevada reservoirs. He showed me steelhead and salmon fishing on the Smith River and the Sacramento. We never caught any. (A pattern I repeat all too often). A couple of memories was my Mom yelling at him as we pulled in after midnight without calling that we would be so late. He always rided me for "admiring" the fish before we got them into the boat. The biggest trip we did was Campbell River, British Columbia. We camped in his Fiberform boat at the Marina and fished the salt everyday for two weeks. It was paradise.

Ford said that things would be different after I turned 16. He said that we would not fish as often. Something about girls, growing up. I refused to believe it - but ya know, he was right. We never had a year like the year I was 15.

I returned the favor when I was in college. Ford visited me and we fished for steelhead. He finally caught his first, a chromer at a spot I took him too that day.

Ford has passed on, but I think of him often. Especially, when I admire a fish before it gets into the boat - what we now called crackered.

[ 04-15-2003, 10:56 PM: Message edited by: Navigator ]
 

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My father is my mentor. I caught my first steelhead when I was 6 it was as big as I was. We fished together ever weekend tell I hit 16 then the girls, cars, parties, became more important. I rediscovered fishing in my mid-twenties (I am 31 now.) and have become addicted. My father is still my mentor as well as pro guide Jack Smith who is one of my father’s best friends. I admire their vast knowledge and skill. There’s nothing like taking out my friends fishing, then calling pops to tell him about the 2 or 3 fish that we land. He gets excited then proceeds to tell me about how he and Jack hooked 17 and landed 13. It never fails the mentor will always out-do the student. I am so grateful to have them as mentor the knowledge they posses is priceless. My father has kept a fishing log of ever fish he has caught for the past 30 years. It’s amazing to read and it brings back so many childhood memories of fish landed and lost. I hope to have these two in my life for many more years. Also hope to become a mentor as well.

[ 04-16-2003, 12:23 AM: Message edited by: Teamfish ]
 

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Boy, I think the first one would have to be Terry Mulkey, I took a steelhead fishing clinic from him that hooked me forever. He spent extra time with me and helped me any way he could. I also spent lots of time at the tackle store he worked at picking is brain also. We are still good friends that get to fish together from time to time and I cherish every moment.

The second friend would have to be my old buddy Dave. I bought a fishing trip from him in a fundraiser and caught two chinook in less than a half hour and I was hooked. We worked together and he spent hours teaching me how to make spinners, spreaders, rigging up cut-plug herring, wrapping sardines and everything else. He also sold me his drift boat and taught me how to row it. I even put his Loomis rods in the bushes and he still kept his cool....... :grin:

I truly thank these two old friends of mine for teaching me the love of fishing. We don't have contact with each other than maybe once a year or such, but my heart will always have a special place for them.

Tight lines, Kimmer.......... Fish On.

[ 04-16-2003, 01:46 PM: Message edited by: Kim Katsion ]
 

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I have been fortunate enough to have a dad that likes to fish as much as I do..... He took me every chance he got when I was younger and now we fish together as much as we can. My dad is my mentor and role model........ :bowdown:

I have however learned many more techniques from others that are specialties in their own methods....for example:

Jigs- Mark Anderson
Plugs/trolling- Lee Freeman
Flies- Bernie

Plus many others and I continue to learn every time I go to the river and with every passing conversation I get to have from someone that knows something I dont.

John
 

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My father taught me to fish. He had fished as a kid but but wouldn't be called an avid fisherman by any means...but he made sure my brother and I learned and had the opportunity to fish. I remember my first trout...a planter from Germany Creek back about 1955 caught on a single egg fished the way he showed me using a telescopic steel flyrod. My first steelhead trip was a year or two earlier with him, plunking in the hole below the Modrow Bridge on the Kalama...nothing was caught...establishing a pattern that persisted for another 15 yrs.

My dad made sure I was equipped with fishing gear and when spinning tackle was introduced in the late '50s I got a Shakespeare WonderReel, rod, line, etc. for my birthday. Later it was fly rods, fly tying, and fly fishing...and I flyfished in Alaska in 1963 when dad took the family there on vacation.

The intro to fishing didn't take with my brother...but I was seduced hook, line, & sinker. :wink:

[ 04-16-2003, 06:09 AM: Message edited by: GutshotApe ]
 

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I'd already been fishing for quite awhile,when I joined the Ore, fishing club(not a memeber now )
and met Richard Paradinski and became friends with him.He definatly helped me and changed alot of the ways I fished.He died a few yrs ago but I still think of him alot esp. when steelhead fishing.He Def. upped my catch ratio.
Bob


[ 04-16-2003, 08:14 AM: Message edited by: dawhunt ]
 

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All that I know about fishing I owe to my dad. He was a fisherman way before I ever came into the world (1976) and my parents always tell me how excited my dad was when he had a son.

For as long as I can remember I've been fishing with my dad, whether for crappie at the Potholes or steelhead/salmon at the Cowlitz. I still remember him teaching my how to tie knots and loops, spool reels, and probably most importantly run a boat.

Now that I'm all grown up (a big 27) I reflect back on my childhood and realize just how much of a fishing mentor my dad was.

Now there's only one problem, and as he always tells my mom, "I've created a monster!!" :dance:
 

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I think the second part of this question is

"Who are you mentoring now?"... what are you doing to "pay it forward".

I currently take my 3 kids fishing, and have also taken several co-workers, and most of my 12 nieces and nephews.

My dad taught me, and I am now trying to take everyone I can. Remember the more people we expose the the joys of the outdoors the better chance we have of keeping these programs going....

Rip'N'Lips
 

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My Grandfather is the best, from Newport,Or to Port Alice,BC I have spent some of the best days in my life learning on the Pacific with him.
 

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My Dad. Started around 5 years old fishing the lakes and streams of Colorado until 18 years ago, moved to Oregon and caught my first Steelhead. Now it's tough to find any interest in Trout. My son started the same age.

My Dad is now 77 and can no longer fish with us due to health problems. He loves our stories and pictures. I miss the old days :depressed: !! But, am sure enjoying the time with my son as he loves to fish as much as I do and the look on Grandpa's face when his grandson brings home Salmon for the barbecue.

Chris
 

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Without a doubt, my grandfather. I grew up on the east coast and he taught me to fish for brook trout in streams that you could step across. A trophy fish would be anything over 10. We spent coutless summer afternoons stalking 6 inch trout in mountain streams. It is something I'll never forget.
 

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Actually my mother. My grandfather passed away when I was really young and left all his gear to my mother. She would load my brother, myself and our two neighborhood buddies up in our old car and off we'd go to the farm ponds for crappie, bluegil, bass whatever. Still laugh at some of the times we all had. Mom was a lot of fun and those sandwiches and coolaid lunches made fun times. Mom passed away in 99 but she goes with me everytime I fish. To this day, my brother, one of those old neighborhood buddies and I still are avid fisherman. We passed along the family tradition. My two daughters and wife like to fish. I owe a debt of gratitude to a fishing buddy that I met back in the early 70's. We still fish together. He showed me tricks of the trade for steelhead and salmon fishing that were truly remarkable. We have shared awesome fishing days between the two of us. I guess as we get older we look back at those times and really appreciate the ones who got us started and the ones who helped guide us along the way.
 

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My Dad and Grandfather....Grandpa catches way more fish than my dad... I guess it helps to do the research of where and when the fish are in the river. My dad used to say...hey, lets go fishing...and we'd go. Never really catch much other than the stocked rainbow trout at the local lake or river. Grandpa wouldn't go fishing unless he knew he's catch fish...Crane Prarie, Billy Chinook, The Deschuttes and a few choice spots along the Oregon Coast. Super memories and always good eating whenever fish was caught...camping was also part of the fishing experience when growing up. We never brought a main course, hoping to catch our dinner and usually that happened. Thanks for starting this thread!
 

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my fishing mentor: ifish.

dad got me started young with a cane pole (really). from there, i graduated to the snoopy, the spinning reel and finally the abu baitcaster (which i still have and use). we did mostly saltwater fishing, but also some freshwater stuff too for a change of pace. unfortunately, there are no salmon or steelhead in texas so i never got to learn the ins and outs of it all growing up. then came 16, cars, parties, etc and the fishing stuff collected dust.

choppers got me started up again going out for silvers on the clack. we don't get together to fish that often anymore though and i think he keeps his best secrets secret. i've fished with a couple of great folks from ifish who have tried to share their wisdom if i'd take the time to listen.

most everything i've learned about salmon and steelhead fishing i learned right here. how good a teacher is ifish? well, last year's tag only had two fish on it but that didn't include several native winters that i released. so far this year, my tag has one fish on it but i haven't been hitting it too hard yet this season. seems like the dry spells are a little shorter now too.
 

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My Dad. Taught me to get up early and hike high and far. Never could fish comfortably within sight of the car. I can't believe I am still draggin my nearly 50 year old body up and down cliffs. But I gotta admit that the top and heater is a bit more civilized in the sled! :wink:
 

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Great topic!
Well, originally it was my dad. My first intro to fish alot was in the redfeather lakes near Ft. Collins Col. or near redmond. As I grew up dad was too busy making a good living for us so I became self-reliant and fish alone or with buddies. Alot of years were spent back in the NE where I just got out, explored and learned. In my middle teens I began fishing more with my cousin who's a few years older. He spent college years in Montana and brought his love back to oregon. He introduced me to flyfishing for salmon/steelhead and trout, and now years later we both enjoy getting out and fishing and hunting together.
Funny, but I'm the only one in the family who blossomed into a true outdoorsman, but I really enjoy taking my brothers and dad out in the boat. Getting them into fish and teaching them something
is so much more rewarding than catching a fish myself. I hope to play mentor to my son Wyatt who makes his debut in mid July. Just need to find
waders for a toddler!
 

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oh, and I can't forget to acknowledge Nick Amato.
What CAN"T you learn from him. I enjoy fishing with him, and have learned alot, especially about steelheading. He's also taught me how to drink cheap beer. Thanks Nick!
 

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My Dad. He is disabled, so it was mostly trout fishing at lakes on camping trips. I love fishing with him, but he doesn't really care for it.
Later, I latched on to my high school girlfriends Dad, Jim Peebles. We did a lot of steelhead/coho fishing on the Sandy in the late 80's and early 90's when it was good. He really started the fire.
After getting out of the Marine Corps, I went through the Fisheries Technology program at Mt. Hood Community College. I was fortunate enough to meet Phill Smith. He really dialed me in on salmon and steelhead. He's a guide now, and he catches a ton of fish. I get on his nerves from time to time, but I appreciate all he's shown me.
I owe most of my drift boat rowing skill to Phill and Greg Nee, Nuttinbutnet on ifish.
I learned a lot on the riverbanks, watching and questioning the pros. Thanks to all...
 
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