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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Check this place out. I have never used them but have driven by it for years.



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I checked out their website, and this is just what I was looking for. I will take the old radio there today. Thanks!
 

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I used to work for a family friend that had an electronics business and he used to fix those things. He had a ton of them laying around. One time I spent probably 6 months organizing his tubes. He told me to be really careful because those tubes were really old and really expensive
 

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I saw the dial and was curious if it was SW only or maybe had an AM band. We used to have a console radio similar to that when I was a kid and remembered enjoying finding international broadcasts in addition to AM radio. One of the links to my search came up with that and thought I'd pass it along. 1936. That one you got is in excellent condition. But you tend to find gems like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I saw the dial and was curious if it was SW only or maybe had an AM band. We used to have a console radio similar to that when I was a kid and remembered enjoying finding international broadcasts in addition to AM radio. One of the links to my search came up with that and thought I'd pass it along. 1936. That one you got is in excellent condition. But you tend to find gems like that.
Good question about the bands; hopefully I will figure that out when I get the manual. The radio was missing the brass bezel and glass that goes over the dial. With some internet searching yesterday I already found and ordered the correct bezel with glass. The estimate at Burlingame Radio repair (all they do is work on old radios and TVs) was $600.00 to $800.00 for a complete chassis rebuild which would make it work like new. I don't know if I can justify spending that much to listen to AM radio in the living room where I already have a stereo system with XM Satellite radio. But... the old radio will really look nice even if it doesn't work.

The owner of Burlingame Radio said that the radio I bought is a rare model that he has never seen before. He was impressed with some of the components on the chassis which he said were ahead of its time. Except for the bezel and glass, no parts were missing and everything was in original condition, right down to the fabric covered power cord.
 

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I’m a tube guy.... guitar amps, mic preamps and even a few mic’s themselves when I was running my studio. My first tube amp was a transitional ‘64 Fender Bandmaster, blackface, but with the knobs and layout of the brownface amps. Many many tube amps since then. Love me some TUBES!

Mike Nemeth @ Twisted Wires in Eugene is your guy if you are in this area.
 

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Waterfish. I used to play with tube electronics a long time ago. Cleaning the dust out of the chassis and getting the tubes checked might get it going. There is a website 'tubedepot' that is a great source for tube amplifiers. Ten or so years ago (Fukushima) I worked with them to revive a civil defense radiac and bought a few tubes.

Tubes are pricey now but you can still buy them. A tube tester would tell you which ones had burned out heaters or cracked or weak. Not having much luck finding one near PDX. Usually places that sell amplifiers and speaker stacks have resources for repairing tube electronics.

That is a gem. That general type of radio was common in the era of WWII. "December 7th 1941 a day which will live in infamy ...."
 

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I have a stack of radio repair manuals from the 30's thru ? By a stack I talking 5'+. I probably should find a good home for them.🤷‍♂️
 

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Me and my neighbor used to buy old wood cabinet console radios like that back in the sixties from a goodwill store when we were in our young teens. We would haul them home in a wagon and take all the tubes out and test them at a tube tester in Bel Air shopping center in Beaverton. We got a few of them going and stripped others down for parts as my friend was into amateur radio. We had a real nice old Airline with a beautiful wood cabinet and the green tuning eye. We strung a wire antenna high in a fir tree and DX'ed stations all over North America on that old Airline.
 

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Do be aware that you can shock the bejeezus out of yourself working on tube gear, even in its not plugged in! I am speaking from experience here. The large capacitors in the power supply store a high-voltage charge.
 
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Do be aware that you can shock the bejeezus out of yourself working on tube gear, even in its not plugged in! I am speaking from experience here. The large capacitors in the power supply store a high-voltage charge.
True that! We used to take the salvaged capacitors from the tube radios and make home made cattle prods with them. They could give you a big jolt, even thru a pair or Levis.
 

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100 to 200 Volts DC is a common voltage in the tube radio chassis. When you have the radio unplugged to work on it use an insulated handle tool like a screwdriver to short out the terminals (snap!) on the capacitors. This will discharge them and make it a little safer. With Tube TVs the stored voltage can be much higher.

We built a Lafayette Radio brand color television kit when I was in High School. Dad was really interested in electronics and I think that was where I got the bug. We watched that thing for many years.

BTW DC voltage shock is way more shocking than 110V AC. Don't ask me how I know this.
 
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