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I had kokanee last night for dinner for the first time. Delicious! My brother in law gave us a couple. Where do you go to catch these things? What do you use to catch them? What's the closest place to fish for them from Clackamas (the town)?
Thanks in advance to all!!
 

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http://www.coastangler.com/kokanee/ try this page for info.

A lot of the best koke fishing is on the century drive lakes by Bend. They say the next record will come out of Wallawa (sp) lake.

I would agree that kokanee are one the best eating fish. Smoked with cream cheese spread on a bagel and they are better than candy.
 

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Besides the link posted above do an Ifish search on any of the popular Kokanee lakes such as Odell, Cresent or Paulina, and you will find lots of info on technique. This time of year the fish will be deeper so either you will either have to use mega weight or a downrigger to troll, or jig. The closest place I can think of for you to catch Kokanee would be Greenpeter reservoir out side of Sweethome off of Hwy 20. Not only are they good to eat, but on light gear they are a blast to catch.
 

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Definately head to Green Peter Reservoir! If you can figure out what they'll take, you can take home 25 per person(With no size limits) :shocked: :shocked: ! They have an over-population problem there, so they encourage you to take as many as you can.

Good luck limiting out!

--Skahorse
 

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yale, swift, mirwin. About a45 minutesnorth up I-5 then head east. Good fishing, they are smaller that what you'll get in central oregon, but less of a drive too. For numbers, Odell's 25 per person is almost more than a guy can handle.
Have fun!
GBs
 

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Okay, here's where you go: Odell, Timothy, Crescent, Detroit, Green Peter, Wallowa, Paulina. Each lake has its quirks. For example, the kokanee in Detroit are deeper than at Green Peter, and the flesh is more pale and not as flavorful than the fish at Green Peter. If you want to go, time is running out this year. My suggestion is Odell or Green Peter.

Here's what you do when you get there: If you have a fish finder, it is easier. No matter what you're fishing with, if it's not at the same depth as the fish, you're simply out for a boat ride. Which brings up the necessity of a boat. What to do if you don't have a boat will be at the end of this post. If you don't have a fish finder, this time of year start at 40 feet, and go deeper at five foot intervals until you start hooking up, then keep it up. If you have a downrigger, great. If you don't have a downrigger, pick up the smallest Deep Six diving sinker at GI Joe's or Sportsman's Warehouse. Preferably clear or pink. The reason you need one of those is so you can accurately get your lure down to the appropriate depth. You're basic setup will be either a gang troll or a dodger. I prefer using a dodger because I don't have a downrigger to hang a gang troll off of, and a gang troll creates a lot of resistance in the water when you're reeling in the fish. I use the smallest silver Luhr-Jensen dodger. About 12-18 inches behind that, use a wedding-ring, a triple teaser, kokanee kandee (available at Walmart, and a great lure), needlefish, or similar thin-bladed trolling spoon. Good colors are pink, white, chartreuse, and orange, in that order. Sometimes midnight blue works if nothing else does. Tip your hook with white corn soaked in anise scent. If your rod isn't like a buggy whip, use a rubber snubber, or use a very sturdy, thick rubber band between your dodger and your leader. Kokanee have tender mouths, and often come unhooked. You'll need a snubber as a shock absorber. If your rod is really light and you're using a downrigger, you may be able to get by without the snubber. Otherwise, you'll lose half your fish.

Troll S L O W L Y. Alter your speed at irregular intervals, and troll in an S pattern. Often the fish will take coming out of a turn or at a change of speed. At Detroit and Green Peter, try near islands, points, and where there are steep drop offs. Lots of those at Green Peter. When you hook a fish, or get a bite, troll back through the same area, as the fish school up in the summer. Where you find one, you'll find more, until you finally spook the school away and have to find it again.

Use a net to land your fish. Don't take them out of the water, or you run the risk of it coming off. Again, they have very fragile mouths. When you get a kokanee, sometimes it will feel like you've lost the fish. Keep reeling. Sometimes they are simply following the dodger up to the boat, even though they've been hooked. When they get closer to the surface, they'll start fighting again. Often they go absolutely berserk on the surface.

If you don't have a boat, you can try off a dam or where there is a very steep drop off. Simply tie on a 1/4 or 1/2 oz. crescent sinker, then about 18 inches of leader to the same lure you'd use trolling. Cast out, and let it sink, counting about one second per foot till it gets where you think the fish are. Example: If you want it at fifty feet, count to fifty like you would counting off seconds. Then start reeling slowly. It's not perfect, but it works. Or jig a small pink, white or chartreuse buzz bomb. I've actually seen schools of kokanee following in a lure casting off of Green Peter dam in the spring when the fish are near the surface. If you're fishing off a dam, alternate your lure every 15-20 minutes if it's not producing within that time frame. Sometimes if they see it over and over again, they lose interest in it.

Good luck! Kokanee are a blast! I hope you get some!

happybrew
 

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one lake that was left off of the list is billy chinook, which has the highest population of kokes i would bet, anywhere on the planet, and they all spawn up the metolious arm. :cheers:
 

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I fished Green Peter yesterday afternoon trolling (without a fishfinder) with a downrigger along the dam barrier with no luck. When the whitecaps started to show I took tha kayak out and bank fished for a few hours.

Not even a bite. This is the first time I've been skunked at Green Peter as I usually take home dinner for at least one.
 

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Great Kokanee primer Happybrew!!


I just want to stress one thing Happybrew said..... White shoe-peg corn, NOT yellow corn. For some reason that's beyond me, it's the white corn that catches 'em and make sure the end of the kernel closest to the cob is where you insert the tip of the hook....

Follow Happybrew's advice and there'll soon be some great eatin' fish on your dinner table!!

Good luck, and tight lines. :smile: Tim
 

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Way to go Happybrew, very good information. What about lake Simtustus, just below Billy Chinook, it's one of our favorites and much less boat traffic.

I have done well with worm or a meal worm instead of the white corn. But I always take some as well. I have also done ok solking the corn in craw anise as well.

Good luck. :cool:
 

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I have outfished my buddy's shopeg corn many times with #14 spi-n-glos. Most every color has worked. Green with red marks my favorite.
,ed
 

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I've done great with the spin-n-glo too. Red gammie hook is the ticket. They are notorious followers, so the "S" turns and varied speed will draw strikes very often. It's easy to get lazy and forgoet to move around. Like he said, troll
SLOW.
 
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