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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
As an EV advocate and early adopter I am not an objective observer. We have gone from owning one short range car that is like driving a car around on an 1/8 tank of gas to this later generation which has no worries about range. I own one of the recalled Bolt EV's. The recall issue is not very common but like a plane crash or nuke plant meltdown the consequences can be horrific. Worst case your house burns down. There is no way to contain a class 'D' fire. We just completed the recall for battery replacement. This was done at no cost to us. It took less than a day and we got an additional 10% battery capacity, raising the projected range from 230 to about 260 miles. A bonus is the battery warranty which starts over and goes for 100,000 miles and 8 years. I planned on an 8 year life for the car but now this has been extended by at least 3 years. Many cars produced do not last that long, especially if they are driven in states with salted roads.

The dealership we visit will do an estimated 1000 battery replacements at the rate of 2 or so a day. About 1/3 of the service bays are stacked 2 high with new batteries in big crates.

This weeks crop of batteries for replacement.
Tire Building Wheel Wood Vehicle


Can't say enough good things about Chevy. I've been a fan most of the time I have been driving cars. It was LG the battery manufacturer that paid for this manufacturing defect and recall costing in the Billions of dollars to correct. But Chevy took it to another level by recalling all of the Bolts produced since the defect was discovered and offering to replace the batteries, free of charge. You don't see that level of customer care very often.

Since this is so often a talking point of the EV deniers, I asked about the old battery they removed. It was packed in the crate the new one came in and will be shipped back to the manufacturer for autopsy and recycling of the rare earth materials.
 

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In today's news:
General Motors Co. (NYSE: GM) plans to boost the production of Cadillac SUV and electric trucks by over six-fold in 2022, compared to the earlier plan, Reuters reported citing information shared with the company’s suppliers.

GM plans to manufacture 46,000 battery-powered Cadillac SUVs and electric trucks this year versus the previously planned output of 7,000.
 

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Why are Teslas so much more efficient than other electric cars?
"The Lucid Air Dream Edition was recently rated by the Environmental Protection Agency with an estimated driving range of 520 miles on a full charge. That's the longest range of any purely battery-powered car yet rated by the EPA, including Tesla's Model S Long Range. It's not just a little longer, either. The Air goes an estimated 115 miles farther on a charge than the Tesla. It's even farther than most gasoline cars can travel on a full tank."

I have some Lucid stock and they have started delivering cars. High dollar though. Here's an interesting race between Tesla's S Plaid speedster and Lucid's plushmobile.
 

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Better PR? Friends neighbor is a Tesla mechanic. They had to add extra lifts they had so many things to fix a couple years ago. Neighbor up the street. Had 2 door handles replaced under warranty, now she complains that they want a $1000 to replace another handle. Totally unacceptable!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm probably going to get the details wrong but here is what I know about it. I think there is a difference in battery technology as well as capacity. In the GM version of the EV battery each cell looks like a foil wrapped pop tart. They pack these cells together oriented vertically in a horizontal tank with the battery "posts" at the top. This is the floor of the car basically. The tank is cooled (or heated) by an antifreeze solution and a radiator. This greatly increases the life and operating conditions that the battery can perform in. So far the limits I have tested are 115 F last summer down to -20 F out in the desert east of Burns. At -20F the range took a 30% hit. When the car is controlling the battery temperature some of the power is used for 'Battery conditioning'. Nissan Leaf and others did not do cooling systems and in the early versions their cars suffered thermal damage to the battery due to heating. The Bolt has three individual cooling systems. One for the battery, one for the motor and one for the power electronics that run the motor.

The only thing under the hood I can mess with is the windshield washer tank. The orange cables are 400 volts DC. Definitely not going to mess with that.

Tesla was using a battery that looks like an ordinary dry cell but with different dimensions. This is similar to what you find when you break open a battery powered tool battery. Not sure what they are doing now but the technology is different than GM and it was based on a battery type that was widely used. At this stage of the game we are still dealing with VHS and Betamax versions of this technology. There are three major formats for charging and one that is universal. Eventually the performance and cost will narrow these many ways to skin the cat down to the best solution.
 

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As an EV advocate and early adopter I am not an objective observer.
This is an understatement. I have found it also to be true of anyone else who owns an EV. Tesla owners are worse than most, but not all. I just got introduced to the term "Plaid Dad" which is what they call guys who bought a Tesla Plaid and take it to the dragstrip to show off their 8 second car they did nothing to and can do nothing to.

I will buy an EV when the economics are right for me and I need a new vehicle. That hasn't happened yet. While I understand that EVs are the future, I don't need (or want) to join the cult of early adopters.

I have also yet to meet the outdoorsyperson who doesn't have a backup fossil fueled vehicle to their EV or EVs. So until they have an AWD, high ground clearance long range EV with some towing capability that costs less than 6 figures, I won't own one. Owning two rigs when I could own just one will never pencil out for me.

Glad Chevy took care of you, it would not have surprised me at all if they didn't though.
 

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This is an understatement. I have found it also to be true of anyone else who owns an EV. Tesla owners are worse than most, but not all. I just got introduced to the term "Plaid Dad" which is what they call guys who bought a Tesla Plaid and take it to the dragstrip to show off their 8 second car they did nothing to and can do nothing to.

I will buy an EV when the economics are right for me and I need a new vehicle. That hasn't happened yet. While I understand that EVs are the future, I don't need (or want) to join the cult of early adopters.

I have also yet to meet the outdoorsyperson who doesn't have a backup fossil fueled vehicle to their EV or EVs. So until they have an AWD, high ground clearance long range EV with some towing capability that costs less than 6 figures, I won't own one. Owning two rigs when I could own just one will never pencil out for me.

Glad Chevy took care of you, it would not have surprised me at all if they didn't though.
Same. I just bought a vehicle. I did a side by side comparison, and even if diesel goes to $6/gallon it doesn't pencil.

OP glad GM took care of you.
 

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Wife got blasted by buy a uninsured heroine addict. It messed up my plan to wait a couple years for the EV build out. I saw the used Bolts and really considered it. I thought why not buy a used car with a new battery. I found that the dealers have been snapping them up cheap and reselling the newer ones around 30k. I wish I could have picked one up under 20k. Used cars are stupid expensive now. I went gas but a EV is in my near future 2yrs. I think prices will be dropping and range increasing.
I sure like the range those bolts are putting out now though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I will be driving that car to Newport to fish this summer. A large cooler easily fits in the back. Something I checked before I bought it. At least the only gas I have to buy will be boat fuel. Kurt is right. I still own an ancient powerstroke. It gets occasional use for dump runs, landscape materials and towing the boat. A truck is part of the deal when you live in this part of the world and you play outdoors.

How much is gas costing now? What about next week?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
8 years average life. LG is recalling them. Dealership told me that LG would salvage the rare earth metals. Lithium is one limit on battery production but even more so is the cobalt, nickel and other less consumed metals. Neodymium is used for the super strong permanent magnets in brushless electric motors. Not sure what they do with the tank, packaging, separators and other unusable materials. People ask the question 'but what about the dead batteries, blah, blah, blah." Funny thing is no one asks about the disposable lithium batteries and millions of lead acid batteries that are scrapped every year. Or the used motor oil from ICE cars. Lead acid battery recycling is so toxic that it is almost 100% off shored now. To places that don't have much in the way of environmental or work place safety regulations.

Come to think of it there are not many questions out there on oil spills, price gouging, geopolitics related to oil, subsidies (tax credits) paid to oil companies for 'research' and other corporate welfare. The environmental destruction caused is not factored in to the cost of doing the mineral extraction and transport. I doubt that Exxon paid a few cents on the dollar for the Valdez spill and the same was done for BP on the Deepwater horizon fiasco. In this country capitolism is awesome. Large corporations lease public lands, they get to keep the profits with lots of taxes credited or otherwise unpaid and then when they make a giant mess they bankrupt and slink away and guess who pays for the cleanup? You do when you pay your taxes. That is socialism in this country, keep the profits too big to fail corporation and socialize the consequences. Oil is a trust in the Teddy Roosevelt sense of the word.

There is an alternative ... despite the long term efforts of the lobbyists to kill the electric car.

Eventually the materials for EVs will be another thing mined from the earth that wars are fought over. We will burn that bridge when we get to it.
 

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Cobalt is primarily controlled by China after a US company sold its interest in a South Africa source. Guess who facilitated the sale.
 
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