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I was wondering how well a two way radio (CB) works in the Hwy 6/Wilson River hwy stretch. Are there enough people that still use them to justify getting one for my truck?

Since no one can get cell service in these parts, I figured it would be a good safety item to have on board if one were to get in trouble up there.

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CM
 

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It never hurts to have one, I have used mine in Tigard, when I lived there, anyway, I was able to talk to SE Portland when one of my nephews was left at Chucky Cheese many a year ago, and to help my Brother-in-law out when his jag stop running in N Portland.
Cheap insurance, in my book, if you got it, it may save your life, with out it who knows.
 

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I was wondering how well a two way radio (CB) works in the Hwy 6/Wilson River hwy stretch. Are there enough people that still use them to justify getting one for my truck?

Since no one can get cell service in these parts, I figured it would be a good safety item to have on board if one were to get in trouble up there.

Thanks
CM
They can be quite useful. In the Wilson corridor the terrain will limit your distance. One place you may get out 2-3 miles, another you'd be lucky to get a half mile.

On long freeway jaunts a CB is better than a radar detector, the truckers going to and fro keep you up to date.

I bought mine to keep in touch with buddies on hunting trips. CB channels are the same frequency as cheap handheld walkie talkies. There is a sticker on the walkie-talkie that tells you the one channel it transmitts on. That channel is the one you dial up on your CB.

You can have a "base station" with your CB and keep in touch with your fishing/hunting buddy as long as he/she are in range.

Channel 19 is generally used for East to West highways/freeways, channel 17 North/South but neither of those is a given. At least that's what I've learned in OR/WA.

They can be very handy when accessing hunting/fishing spots on backroads with active logging.

Somewhere after you turn up one of these roads you'll see a sign or a stump with a spray-painted sign that tells you the channel the log trucks are using. The channels will vary but it's nice to know when a log truck is barreling down the road at you a half mile away and you have time to pull over and let em' by.
 
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