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I pulled out my crab pots this weekend and did a tune up on them, new bait cages, new bungies on the doors, inspected ropes.... etc......

I was installing some floats on a new rope when I got to thinking about all the crab pot floats I see that are installed backwards when crabbing. The pointed end of the float works best when installed pointing towards the pot.
I see floats installed backwards that when the current starts to rip, the big flat end of the float gets sucked under the water. Kind of like anchoring a boat by the stern :rolleyes:

I also see floats where the owner has ran the rope thru the float and then brought the tail back around and tied it to the mainline, putting the float sideways. :rolleyes:

You will have better luck finding your float on top of the water if you run the rope from the pot thru the small end of the float first and then tie a knot behind the float on the big flat side. Seems pretty simple, but I see a lot of floats on backwards/sideways when I am on the bay.

If the float stays on top of the water, you may keep somebody from running over the float with their boat cutting the rope in their prop.

Some pencil lead in the rope about 1/2 way down helps keep the excess rope from floating and getting in a prop also.

Just a helpful reminder for those that never thought about it and have the floats on backwards. :cool:
 

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BOE- Good advise but I would suggest more than jsut a little pencil lead to weight the line. At least an 8 ounce weight should be used, I use 12. I wouldn't put it 1/2 way down either (that's 'bout 35 feet on my lines). That far down and the line above the weight can still float in shallow water and minimal currents. The weight should go about 8 feet below the float. :cheers:
 

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BOE

All good ideas. Here are a couple things from some rookies with folding traps. We figured this out after one trip to Nehalem and there was line floating everywhere. Our crab trap lines don't float and we use 1/4" to cut down on resistance from the current. Instead of pencil lead we use a loop of decoy line and a cannon ball around the float line a couple of feet down to make sure the line stays down. I've put colored bands of duct tape on the floats to help identify them. The Garibaldi Bait and Service station that advertises on ifish is a $1.00 cheaper than Joes for floats.
 

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Hay fish_on where do get weighted line :whazzup: Iam looking for some.


Good fishen Arch
 

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I found weighted line up at hoods canal Wa 600ft for 40$ I believe it 3/8 in They said thats there nomal price for it. Works for me.
 

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I use two floats seperated about 4 feet. I do this because when you stay a little too long, the current might pull one float under before you realized what's happening. If the wind is blowing in addition to a tide starting to run, it's really hard to spot one bouy. I normally crab downstream of Bouy 21 near Clatsop Spit. Maybe I should find a quieter spot. :smile:
 

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I think two floats on leaded line is the only way to go. And don't skimp on float size, and put your number on your floats. Oh yeah putting them on the small end down does make a difference.
 

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please please please please! Weight your ropes! I am so tired of having to swerve at the last second because you don't see the 50 feet of rope floating on the surface.
d
 

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Originally posted by fishdog7:
Hay fish_on where do get weighted line :whazzup: Iam looking for some.


Good fishen Arch
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">I got mine at Sportco in Fife Wa, they have it already cut into 100' lengths with or w/o a bouy. Plus you don't have to pay tax if you are am Oregon resident.
 

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Good suggestions BOE & MB... I too am concerned about excess rope getting into props... so put pencil lead in the line every 10' or so... that way all is submerged.

I've also gotten in the habit of tying on extra floats (empty milk jugs work great) to ensure the floats do not submerge in the currents.

[ 06-09-2003, 12:23 PM: Message edited by: blubeast ]
 

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I use weighted line for my pots, that way I don't have to worry about pencil lead. 100'w/bouy is usually about $20.
 

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Great suggestion on weighting ropes. Last yer I hit a rope while motoring back up to Wheeler with my drift boat. I passed the float by about 30 feet and still got the rope. I will throw in a vote for weighting down the ropes.

Hey BOE, are you still making crab traps?
 

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A trick I like is to add another small float about 3 feet from the main float. This will aid in determining the direction at which the pot is below you. I've had much better catch ratios when I approach the ropes from below, pick up the small bouy, then the main, then gently pick up the trailing slack, following the direction the two bouys indicated. Use the boats momentum. then as I get that up, I then tug firmly and lift the pot. You get a more verticcal lift and will loose many less crabs. This is a great trick on the anywhere that you have current.
 

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I've heard 4 feet and 3 feet as the distance between the two floats (if you use a second float). I always use about 6 feet between the two for extra insurance if the tidal current gets too strong. Two floats also makes it pretty easy to snag the line with the boat hook between the two.
 

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I would like to share a trick taught to me by a commercial crabber:

As crab rely on smell, when dropping pots
be sure the tunnels are with the current.

Having fished with him off Garibaldi, we would tack into the current and he would throw the pot over and tow it a few feet prior to letting go with the float. As the line was attached above a tunnel, it would direct the lie into the current. As a crab follows the bait scent through the current, it is directed into the tunnel and bingo.
 

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Englund Marine has an excellent selection of sinking crab line. Floating line is asking to loose gear.
If you ever plan on using a pot puller winch or sheave weights in the line will screw you up bad but sinking line works well. Its not much more spendy than floating line.
 

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Bobs in Longview usually carries 3/8" leaded line for a decent price (can't remember how much per foot). They have carried it on the roll (you tell em how much) or in 50' cut lengths. It is nice to handle and it DON'T FLOAT.
 

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Man you guys are sharp.
I was just thinking the double floats would help when there's a lot of kelp and grass, etc. coming in.
 
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