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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
EZ-loader double axle trailer, six years old, lots of use. I just noticed that the hitch/surge brake assembly isn't riding parallel to the tongue, as shown. Is this a problem? Edit: looked inside the tongue, no apparent elongation of the holes, or shearing of the bolts.
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There's should only be 2 bolts holding the actuator to the sq tube, plus your brake line. Think you should have like 2 inch spacers inside the sq tube also. What I see is, it looks like your hitch coupler, wrong name but . Looks like its compresed in and should look like this. This isent your i understand its just a example.
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If in fact there is no elongation then it was installed at an angle and has remained that way until you now noticed it. I would loosen the 2 bolts and see if it there is any excessive vertical play that may not be visibly noticeable without loosening them. Either way I'd like to see the last/rear hole have a bolt as well.
 

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I have a 2021 23' seahawk on the same trailer but it has a bolt in all 3 holes not just 2. If it was me i would with the jack down loosen up the bolts and see if it will straiten out then drill for the 3rd hole make sure there is nothing on the inside like wires that you might drill in to and use good grade 5 or grade 8 bolts. That probly will help carry the load better.
 

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If using Grade 8, use Locktite. There can be a problem with keeping grade 8 bolts from loosening. Hard to get enough prestretch in the bolt to keep the nut always under tension. Grade 5 works better in a lot of instances. Track hoes were a case where grade 8 on the arms kept coming loose 50 years ago. Came up when I was in engineering school.
 

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I kinda said before I thought, it looks like your actuator isent working anyway, so how it's mounted to the trailers frame is secondary. Looking at your picture, inless your backed into a fence or tree, maybe parked head first downhill your coupler shouldn't be recessed, I believe yours is. Well as I think more , this might not be true if you have electric brakes. Tie Down Manufacturing who made mine is now owned by Dexter, and I paid about $250.00 for mine and was ez to install, good luck Grant
 

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I nolticed the same thing fishorgolf saw. The actuator is depressed all the way back in full braking mode.
Do you notice a clunking when you stop and then pull forward? If so there is a small shock absorber attached to the actuator that slows the depression and forward motion of the actuator. It is probably malfunctioning.
If the bolt holes are not elongated then I think you are fine on that situation. Probably time to replace everything.
Also brake fluid on boat trailers should be replaced every 2 years to prevent internal corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
... The actuator is depressed all the way back in full braking mode.
Do you notice a clunking when you stop and then pull forward? If so there is a small shock absorber attached to the actuator that slows the depression and forward motion of the actuator. It is probably malfunctioning.
I'm pretty sure the brakes are functioning correctly. I do get a clunk when I move forward after a stop. The offramp at Kalama is pretty downhill, and I slow easily on that, same as I always have. In the picture, I think it's the way it is simply because I had backed the trailer in. Right now, with the trailer disconnected, the assembly is in the forward position. See this picture.

I'm taking it in to a shop to have the brakes and hubs maintained, and I'll have them look at it.
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