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Or not. :D Click HERE. By the way, this is a link off one of my favorite websites. ScienceDaily.
 

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I was fishing lake Billy Chinook I caught a 16 inch or so Bull Trout, when I released it, it swan on the surface for about 15 feet from the boat and an eagle swoops down and grabs it, should I just not feed the birds?
 

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I was fishing lake Billy Chinook I caught a 16 inch or so Bull Trout, when I released it, it swan on the surface for about 15 feet from the boat and an eagle swoops down and grabs it, should I just not feed the birds?
A friend of mine was fishing with a fly and a clear bubble, and he caught a planter trout. Five seconds later, while the fish is fighting on the surface, an osprey dives and grabs it and takes off:bigshock:. It took me a minute to register, then I had to help my friend get his lower jaw off the ground. He finaly yanked on the rod and the osprey dropped the fish... not much fight left and some impressive cuts on the sides. Wish I had a camera at the time.

S_B
 

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Had an osprey grab a nice trout I was fighting a few years ago at South Twin Lake. Scared the bejeavers out of me when he swooped down out of nowhere practically right at the side of the boat. I got a good bath out of it too! That was one big birdie that knew how to make a good splash! It was successful in getting the trout off my line and all I could do was stand there totally dumbfounded watching in amazement. :crazy:
 

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"Recreational fishing that involves catch-and-release may seem like just good fun, and that released fish go on to live happily ever after, but a recent study at the University of Illinois shows that improper handling techniques by anglers can increase the likelihood of released fish being caught by predators."

:jester: Well Duh!! I'm glad it wasnt my tax dollars paying for this study. Most responsible anglers are well aware of this, even ODFW and WDFW have passed this info along for quite a while. :wave:

Oh ya I almost forgot they want you to hang over the side of the boat and release your unclipped fish while the furbags are in the river too.
 

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Very interesting. I wouldnt have guessed the 4 minute mark being a turning point. If I'm going to photograph a nate I like to have them back in the water in 60 seconds.
 

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4 minutes? That is crazy. I prefer to leave them in the water except for the few seconds needed to get a picture but we usually take most of those shost with the fish in the water. Less than one minute seems like a better guideline to me. Maybe he did his study on catfish....
 

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I agree that 4 minutes is way too long. I also think that the article sounds too "touchy feely" for me. Maybe this study was done by a member of PETA? Next we'll have a study how the fish feels about being caught? I don't know, just my $0.02
 

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4 minutes? That is crazy. I prefer to leave them in the water except for the few seconds needed to get a picture but we usually take most of those shost with the fish in the water. Less than one minute seems like a better guideline to me. Maybe he did his study on catfish....
Speaking from some experience on the subject of catfish - I've seen them last hours out of the water, not minutes. :grin::cheers:
 

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Next time someone is looking to do some bonefish sampling feel free to PM me.:pumpkin: Tough job, but someones got to get per diem to work in the Carribbean. -FF
 

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The article states that the FIGHT & RELEASE shouldn't take more than four minutes. So, if you fight the fish for more than four minutes the fish is in trouble. I have seen guys work steelhead for almost 10 minutes before even trying to get them to come in. That fish is dead. Horsing a fish in isn't all that bad is it? It subdues the fish quickly without a lot of energy expended by the fish and you have more time for pics. If not new info, a good reminder for all catch and release situations. Tight lines all.
 

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Nothing like a published study to restate the obvious.

Reminds of a study I heard about a couple years ago, where researchers found that most of the fish were located where the fisherman where fishing.... :lurk:
 

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This is a great article, and I think anglers need to take this into consideration when they bank/net a fish. Something that will help a little is after you unhook the fish give it a couple minutes to gets it bearings by pushing it back and forth in the water. After you do that then there isn't much more you can do. Just try to give respect to the fish that you had the pleasure of fighting!
 

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Better article as it relates to NW species catch/release was published 2 years ago in STS mag... "Hook Mortality Study" I believe was the Title. Was conducted on salmon by ODFW on the Willamette at Oregon City Falls.

We've all release salmon and trout fought more than 4mins to have them succefully swim away.

Secret is not touching or netting the fish and leaving it in the water while get the hook loose. If removing hook looks to be a chore or additionally harmful to the fish, cut the leader as close to the hook as possible to release.

Touching the fish is the death nail in the coffin.
 

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The article states that the FIGHT & RELEASE shouldn't take more than four minutes. So, if you fight the fish for more than four minutes the fish is in trouble. I have seen guys work steelhead for almost 10 minutes before even trying to get them to come in. That fish is dead. Horsing a fish in isn't all that bad is it? It subdues the fish quickly without a lot of energy expended by the fish and you have more time for pics. If not new info, a good reminder for all catch and release situations. Tight lines all.
I read it again and you are 100% correct. I missed it the first time. Guess I should have looked at the title.
 
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