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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the process of getting a new sled and am wondering what some of the pros and cons are of single vs. tandem axles. The single axle I am looking at will carry the boat no problem. But, I am wondering if there are any advantages to the tandem that may force me to spend the extra $700 for the upgrade.

FF
 

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Well the pro's: you will have a smoother firmer ride and less bounce, you can have a flat and things will "still" stay upright while your pulling over to fix it, safety = four is better than two. easy(ier) to move around in the shop.

cons: with duel axle's you wont be able to jocky your boat around in the garage as easy as with two. if you are in the habit of making real tight turns, and sometimes this is a nessesity, your tires will scuff and wear more. there is a weight issue but not sure how much, probably not more than 1,000 just a guess. more tires, more brakes, more $$$$ maintenience.

I am sure more ppl with chime in with others and having said that, when we got our new boat I wanted duel axle's, just for the safety of having four points of contact on the ground instead of two, but was in such a hurry and didnt want to wait the few extra months for it, so anyone with a duel wanna trade? :smile:
 

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As most sleds are relatively lite, if you don't run a 250HP pump plus trolling motor plus ton of gear, a single axle will work just fine. $700 will buy you a bunch of options to complete the package.

Good fishing
 

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Having lost two tires in the past three weeks, I'm really wishing I had a tandem axle trailer.
 

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Fishfinder,

If it's not a weight issue then it comes down to safety and redundancy.

Mainly, two sets of brakes, two sets of tires.

In an emergency on the highway (remember it's you and maniacs in back of you and idiots in front of you <grin>), you have more control, more stability and braking power.

If you get a flat, you can tow it to safety. A lot of roads don't really have a safe place to change a flat and you are frequently towing in the dark where just being immobile is dangerous much less trying to change a tire.

There are other advantages, less wear and tear with the load shared among two axles, sets of tires, etc.

Brion
 

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I don't know how big your boat is, but I'd do the tandem unless you moor the boat and don't tow much. The tandem is a little harder to back up in tight spots, and a little heavier, and if you do your own maintenance you won't notice much difference in expense. You'll get some of the extra expense back in resale value if you sell it. If you plan on putting some miles on it, $700 can buy a lot of peace of mind. Watching a single axle bobbing and swaying in the rear view on a 300 mile trip can get a little old. :depressed:
 

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Either works just fine...But if you DO get a single axle..make sure you get one to adequately handle the weight of your boat. There are many weight "capacities" options out there.

I have a single, 3000lb. capacity Rogue trailer that works just fine for me.

Along with the dual axle trailers...just remember...you have twice the chances for failure with that extra axle as far as bearings, and tires go. And if you're on top of maintenance...either should do just fine. As for flat tires... if you don't have a spare..well...you'll learn after having a flat, that you should have one handy.

Mark
 

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I am with Silver Hilton, I have had 3 flats with my single on I-5 with my single axle trailer. I also thought that the single had enough "rated capacity" to handle my boat. However the tires have a combined rating of less than the axle.
Go with the doubles!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the replys. They help a lot. I think I will spend the $700 on accessories.

FF
 

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i have noticed that most trailers come with so so tires usually radials, i have heard that bias tires are better for durability but have more rolling ressistance, :shrug:
 

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My dual axle has only one set of brakes. I don't know if this is a common practice or not, but it does help out on maintenance.

I agree with wambam on the tire issue. If you can upgrade your tires while they are putting your trailer together, do it. When I bought my boat and trailer, it came with a minimum ply tire. ( I don't remember what ply). They didn't seam to hold up very well. If you don't decide to upgrade to a dual axle, I think getting the best tires you can is very important.
 
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