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Found this on another forum. Apparantly all of these oils are identical and come from the same refinery. I'll try to find the MSDS for each. I've heard of the Pennzoil not being a synthetic before I came across this. You guys that use it have any opinion?

Pennzoil Premium Outdoor/Multipurpose 2-cycle TCW-3
Pennzoil MARINE Premium Plus 2-cycle (TC-W3)
Pennzoil 2-cycle Oil for Air-Cooled Engines
Quaker State TC-W3 2-cycle Motor oil
Quaker State ITASCA Premium Low Smoke 2-Cycle Engine oil
Quaker State Small Engine Universal 2-cycle Engine oil
Quaker State HD 2-cycle Motor Oil
Quaker State Motorcycle 2-cycle Engine Oil
Super Tech Universal 2-cycle Oil (Wal-Mart brand)
NAUTILUS 2-cycle Outboard Marine Oil (TC-W3) - Note: This is a Shell product and is IDENTICAL to the ones above
Pennzoil MARINE Synthetic Outboard 2-cycle Engine Oil ** This is labeled synthetic but it is identical in makeup as the others.
 

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Honda marine.com most common questions:

What type of engine oil should I use in my Honda marine outboard?

Honda engines are developed, tested, and certified with petroleum based motor oils as a lubricant. We recommend Honda Marine 10W-30 FC-W engine oil or 5W-30M engine oil (see your owner’s manual for recommended oil) available through your local Honda Marine dealer. Honda FC-W Marine engine oil is specially formulated for use in marine engines and has several advantages over automotive oil. See your owner’s manual for oil change intervals.

Honda states to use 10W-30 FC-W engine oil. i did a quick search on the web and found the Honda Marine 10W-30 FC-W engine oil for $5.75 per quart with free shipping, cost less than most synthetics oils and engineered for marine use.
 

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Honda marine.com most common questions:

What type of engine oil should I use in my Honda marine outboard?

Honda engines are developed, tested, and certified with petroleum based motor oils as a lubricant. We recommend Honda Marine 10W-30 FC-W engine oil or 5W-30M engine oil (see your owner’s manual for recommended oil) available through your local Honda Marine dealer. Honda FC-W Marine engine oil is specially formulated for use in marine engines and has several advantages over automotive oil. See your owner’s manual for oil change intervals.

Honda states to use 10W-30 FC-W engine oil. i did a quick search on the web and found the Honda Marine 10W-30 FC-W engine oil for $5.75 per quart with free shipping, cost less than most synthetics oils and engineered for marine use.
 

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This one always intrigues me. In 2007 I purchased a brand new Searunner 20 Hewescraft. When I took it in for the service that must be done to meet the warranty I observed them as they changed the oil. Guess what oil they used? Cheveron from Costco. When I asked the lead shop guy about it he chuckled and said "Yep". That's all he said. I then asked if my engine is covered under warranty if something goes wrong? His reply was absolutely.

I tend to lean towards putting in products that are developed for the motor. I use Yamalube for my yamaha and honda oil for my two honda kickers on each boat. The extra few bucks just seems to be worth it along with running yamaha ring free in all my gas tanks.

To this day I'm still curious about the difference and if there is a real difference? I'm not a mechanic, but it really surprised me to see a major dealer using the blue quart Cheveron oil purchased by the case at Costco.
 

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After 14 years this thread has come back to life. Some things never seem to get resolved.

I have always used Chevron in my engines. Never had a problem. Just think, these outboards are sold all over the world so Honda and the others must make their engines so they run on the poorest fuel and cheapest oil....maybe not quite as long but with the average tank tested life of a Honda being 5000 hours most of us will never wear one out.

My personal research on oil "additives" shows that oil designed for diesel engines has the largest quantity of them and many commercial boaters use diesel oil for its durability and protection of their engines.
 

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Here we go again. Many threads on this. It's usually people with $20,000-$30,000 motors worrying about saving a couple bucks a year. Run what the motor manual says and be done with it.
 

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MP: I would not use any Paraffin based motor oils in anything. Check crude source on Pennz and QS.


Honda does not make motor oil. Their stuff is someone else's relabeled product probably Standard or Mobil, most likely Mobil, maybe both, maybe neither. Another brand not spoken much of these days is Valvoline. Good stuff, one of the first synthetic producers, maybe second to Mobil. Nothing but synthetic goes in anything I own including the lawn mower.

The oil requirements listed in the manual are minimum requirements and just about everything meets them.
 

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I've spoken with two seperate Honda Mechanics regarding my 225 and my 8hp and they've both told me not to use synthetic - just to use 10/30.....

Interesting too as, all the new cars require or recommend synthetic. The action of preventing wear which this oil is better. It is crucial to longevity. There are no negatives and I bet there is not one engine failure caused by using this oil, so long as the maintenance manufacturers guidelines for servicing is followed. This is the smart choice
 

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Was thinking about this the other day. Most outboards spend their running time at half to full throttle. I would think that a synthetic would be beneficial. Anyone running sythetic in their 4 stroke? My Suzuki spec's 10w-40.
A mechanic at Clemens marina told me wait tell the engine is broken before you start using the 10w-30 synthetic oils, didn't ask why.

I was on the fence about using the Honda 10w-30 or the synthetic oil, after thinking it over decided to use the mobile 10w-30 synthetic oil now that my engine is broken.

I have always changed my oil at the first signs of color change, some years I will change as often as three times a season, perty cheep insurance for a $25,000 dollar engine. :twocents:
 

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boating in the cold weather with a pull start motor as a kid, Dad ran 5/50 synthetic castrol. Started much easier in April/May when it was freezing temps. Ran that little 5hp Honda a ton, it was wot to the fishing hole 15min run each way, make that trip probably hundreds of times. That little motor never smoked or burn't oil and it never got quote marine oil.

The only reason we ran synthetic is for starting reasons. I also run synthetic in manual start generators and in my air compressor.

My big outboard gets 15/40 delo 400. $10 gallon. diesel grade oil. I won't have any engine issues related to oil. I just can't take spending $30 per gallon for oil, all you are doing is buying Quote Marine Oil. I however would not run anything but diesel grade oil in an outboard motor.
 

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MP: I would not use any Paraffin based motor oils in anything. Check crude source on Pennz and QS.
Most oils today are "paraffin" based. Paraffin oils make excellent lubricants, they don't have chunks of wax floating around in them like the folklore would lead one to believe, paraffin oil and paraffin wax are not one in the same. Modern refining processes pretty much level the playing field with base stocks anyway. Besides, Pennzoil and QS haven't used Pennsylvania oil for decades.

That said, holy thread resurrection. 13 years is quite some time.
 

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In my youth I worked in a service station. When they actually worked on cars. You could always tell the Pennzoil motors. Always had lots of waxy buildup on under the valve covers. Seemed to work fine. I run Mobil 1 in my inboard and the T-8.
 

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My experience is more in industrial gear lubricants and turbine oils, and some education with cars but in general, if the engine wasnt designed for synthetics then there is no obvious benefit (especially if you are not going to run longer service intervals). Something to think about is a commercial oil is made up of two major parts: the base oil (ester) and the additive package. As has been alluded to here on this thread a lot of manufacturers source the same base oil stocks and the only difference is the additive package (make sense, really only a finite number of refineries). So the main difference between a conventional oil and a synthetic is where that base stock comes from. Conventional is refined from crude oil, its a natural product. Synthetic is made in a lab but in essence, you can create the same hydrocarbon molecules. The thing with synthetics is because you are making them in a lab/facility, you can modify those hydrocarbons or the mixture of them to get the performance you desire.

I believe it is somewhat inherent in synthetic products but the viscosity index is much higher. That is, the viscosity changes much less with a change in temperature. Synthetic oils/esters are more resistant to oxidation than conventional which is why you can increase service intervals. Now if you are getting water in that oil or generating excess debris, that oil life is going to be reduced no matter what.

I would GUESS that most people could get away with either not changing their oil as often as they do or just change the filter rather than the lubricant. The thing is, the added cost and minimal effort of changing it all at once just makes more sense. I read about people getting oil analysis way more on car forums than I have on here, curious what the results would be if more people did OA on their marine engines.
 
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