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Just bought a pre-owned ss prop off a swap board and am replacing my aluminum prop which is a Flo-Torque type. My question is... Is there supposed to be some sort of washer (thrust) behind the ss prop? And what is the proper torque for the prop nut?
 

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Greenhead: WARNING personal opinion. Why are you switching to the SS prop? Unless you race or maybe do all your boating in the ocean you are likely to regret the purchase the first time you hit something. Props are a whole lot cheaper than lower units. The prop won't break, the prop shaft, gears, and seals will. If you hit something hard enough that with an aluminum or composite prop would do lower unit damage; an SS will take out the gears in the top end also. Unfortunately this is from personal experience. :depressed: Brand new motors and I couldn't find AL or composite props locally for the counter rotation and I bent a prop shaft and didn't even scratch the prop. Didn't notice for awhile and ate some gears. Expensive lesson. I realize there are hundreds of people that have never hit anything very large with SS and swear by them. I didn't hit anything I noticed. Mine is probably a minority dissention. Just food for thought. :shrug:
 

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I wouldgo do your manufacturers dealer and look at a shop manual or something. Some have different washers and spacers to use. As for SS, I think it is a good idea to have. STGRule is correct about it being possible to break your lower unit with a stainless, but mor then likely you just screw up your prop really bad. If you have an aluminum and hit something, you won't be going anywhere. With a stainless, you can still limp home which is good if you are in the ocean or a long ways from home. (Know from experience) The stainless seem to hold their shape better when impacted. You also supposedly get a few more mph's with a stainless. It once again like a Ford-Chevy deal.

[ 05-03-2003, 11:14 AM: Message edited by: Mr. Carp ]
 

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If it feels loose, it probably isn't on all of the way. You should be able to use a standard prop bushing set if the prop is really made for your boat.

You may already know this, but if you changed the prop, you need to make sure that the top RPM range is within the working limits of the engine.

There are companies that specialize in prop repair, selection, etc. They should be familiar with the original prop and the new prop and can let you know if you need extra spacers, etc.

As far as SS hurting your outdrive, the newer larger props have a bushing inside the prop that is designed to slip on impact. That should minimize the chance of damage to gears etc if you are unlucky enough to hit something.

SS is usually faster because the blades don't flex as much.
 

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Grnhead99353,

I'd third STGRules' comment.

I dry stack my boat, I'd be cleaning my jet boat on the work stands and it was a steady parade of guys changing their props.

When I mentioned to one of the marina mechancics that these guys should get SS props, he gave me a good demo of destroyed lower unit gears where the prop didn't give and sent all the force of a collision with a log/rock/piling etc. up into the engine.

A lot cheaper to buy a couple good aluminum props (keep a spare & tools in the boat) vs. the high cost of stainless prop and the much higher cost of mangled lower unit.

Brion
 
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