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Discussion Starter #1
http://portland.craigslist.org/clk/boa/414941373.html

What do you dogs think? I will go thru it, and get the correct equipment, but as a base how do you think she would do? Saw a couple like it pulling out of yaquina this weekend with Halibuts aboard, so that is where I got the idea.

Thanks!!
 

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On the rare days when it is dead lake flat out there, it could be doable. Would *I* go out 30 miles to the chicken ranch, or even 15 miles to the rockpile in it? naaaa. That's just my personal feeling, I wouldn't personally go under 20':bigshock:, but that doesn't mean it's not a good boat.

Just because somebody else does something, doesn't always make it a good idea.
 

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You'll see a lot worse boats than that one out on the ocean.

You also read about people jumping off the Empire State Building.


As to the sea-worthyness, sides are too low, open pit is a swaping looking for a place to happen and the length, given it's overall design is too short.

Look for something with higher side and deeper-v for your sea adventures.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for the replies! I want an Arima or Striper, but a bit expensive. Any suggestions as to a "good" ocean boat for around the $5k mark? I just read the post about what makes a good ocean boat, and it seems like most of that topic is about bigger more expensive boats. This would be used for an occasional ocean trip with most use around the bays!

Thanks again for all input!
 

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There are some nice older starcrafts that look like they would bring you to port every time.

Lots of 20' or bigger fiberglass boats out there too.

You wouldn't want to go out of sight of the jettys in that boat. It looks to have an open bow as it sits.

Have seen green water through my windsheild often, the open bow would scare me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There are some nice older starcrafts that look like they would bring you to port every time.

Lots of 20' or bigger fiberglass boats out there too.

You wouldn't want to go out of sight of the jettys in that boat. It looks to have an open bow as it sits.

Have seen green water through my windsheild often, the open bow would scare me.

http://seattle.craigslist.org/kit/boa/410799545.html

Am I getting closer?
 

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I say no, look for a boat with scuppers (sp) i.e self bailing if your talking salmon it might do, but not for tuna. inboards are cheaper, but you still might be out of tuna range because of the amount of gas they eat! not to mention the $300+ gas bill each time out, I bet you cant buy a used 150 four stroke for under 6 grand.

maybe break it up, power this year, electronics next year, then a boat:twocents:
 

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There are some nice older starcrafts that look like they would bring you to port every time.

Lots of 20' or bigger fiberglass boats out there too.

You wouldn't want to go out of sight of the jettys in that boat. It looks to have an open bow as it sits.

Have seen green water through my windsheild often, the open bow would scare me.

Sound advise CB and 5 Salt.:cheers:
 

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Yeep, consider the Bayrunner series by Westcoaster (division of Valco). They are lightweight, high-bow, center console aluminum skiffs popular in Southern California. I had a 15 footer for 16 years and found it very capable for its size. An 18 footer would only need 50 hp, and could be found used in your price range.

The downside is they are very light, and not very comfortable. But they will get you there and back.
 

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Q: How do you tell if your boat is too small while you are fishing on the ocean?


A: You spend most of your time looking for a smaller one.


It would be wise for me to leave these threads alone given my history. It is not unusual to see small boats offshore on nice days. I can think of one 17' whaler in particular and in the past a certain Bayliner Trihull. But .... the open bow is a deal breaker on this one.

That boat would work for crabbing and fishing in bays and some near shore fishing on nice days. Mercruiser outdrive is good but the Ford powerplant makes the parts harder to find. Age is also a factor. At 30 + years you will be limited when you hunt for repair parts. It is always a very good idea to own a smaller boat and learn all the hard lessons that involve rough docking, trailering up the ramp with the drive trimmed down and launching sans drain plug before you buy 'The Boat'. A good starter boat if it is in near perfect condition but a money pit with few benefits otherwise.

If you are looking for a $5k glass boat you can find them. But you will need tools and skills to make it work. Figure another $5k for a repower and whatever else it needs. Every boat has secrets, especially the old ones. So now your inexpensive used boat is costing you 2x the budget. And don't forget a survey on any serious candidate. A few hundred bucks that can save you thousands.

It's an old story. That $5k will buy alot of boat gas and good will on someone elses boat. These guys advocate the larger, newer boat because they have already done the small, severely limited boat thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Q: How do you tell if your boat is too small while you are fishing on the ocean?


A: You spend most of your time looking for a smaller one.


It would be wise for me to leave these threads alone given my history. It is not unusual to see small boats offshore on nice days. I can think of one 17' whaler in particular and in the past a certain Bayliner Trihull. But .... the open bow is a deal breaker on this one.

That boat would work for crabbing and fishing in bays and some near shore fishing on nice days. Mercruiser outdrive is good but the Ford powerplant makes the parts harder to find. Age is also a factor. At 30 + years you will be limited when you hunt for repair parts. It is always a very good idea to own a smaller boat and learn all the hard lessons that involve rough docking, trailering up the ramp with the drive trimmed down and launching sans drain plug before you buy 'The Boat'. A good starter boat if it is in near perfect condition but a money pit with few benefits otherwise.

If you are looking for a $5k glass boat you can find them. But you will need tools and skills to make it work. Figure another $5k for a repower and whatever else it needs. Every boat has secrets, especially the old ones. So now your inexpensive used boat is costing you 2x the budget. And don't forget a survey on any serious candidate. A few hundred bucks that can save you thousands.

It's an old story. That $5k will buy alot of boat gas and good will on someone elses boat. These guys advocate the larger, newer boat because they have already done the small, severely limited boat thing.
Awesome! Thank you. It is true, that is what I am looking for a good starter ocean vessel. I have owned four boats, with the last one being an 18 alumaweld intruder. But I want something fairly cheap that I can do some learning on, until I figure out exactly what I want. I appreciate all the sound advice from those that have the experience and can maybe help me avoid certain (bad) situations!
 

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It might be ok, best to have a survey done on it. Some of the early 80's Trophy's had problems with the hull, and the way the glass was blown in from what I recall.

No matter what you get, it's going to be a comprimise, especially in the price range you're looking at.
 

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4 cylinders only use one exhaust manifold, that is twice as good as a v6 or 8.

Good looking boat, worth a closer look. I would expect to find some wood in its construction, and after 30 years some may be just a bit rotted. That'sa pretty boat.
Agree with Chrome Bumper- Consider what it would take if the engine and outdrive were shot after a month of use. If the person has been using it regular, that is a lot better than if it has been sitting.

If the hull is in good condition and no rot in stringers/transom/other, then it looks like a pretty ocean boat to me. In decent condition this boat would provide a lot of excellent ocean time.
 

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Agree with Chrome Bumper- Consider what it would take if the engine and outdrive were shot after a month of use. If the person has been using it regular, that is a lot better than if it has been sitting.

If the hull is in good condition and no rot in stringers/transom/other, then it looks like a pretty ocean boat to me. In decent condition this boat would provide a lot of excellent ocean time.
That, and repower with a new EFI 4 banger would really go a long way if you have the Rot question answered. I have some wood in my '97 Trophy, and thankfully no rot. That said, it is worth getting looked at just to be on the safe side. :cheers:


-D
 

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Any opinion on the older Tiderunners?? Seems like the tiderunners have a lot of good ideas and are way less than a same year Arima. Being that they are built with an offshore bracket does anyone know if this makes them seem like a longer boat?? I noticed the cuddy cabin model has self draining deck and it seems to have pretty good room to fish with motor not hanging off transom.
 

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I used to own the Beachcraft. It was a good starter project boat for me. I learned alot about the what's and how's of boats and what I wanted in other boats. I spent many afternoons sturgeon fishing on the Columbia with it and many crab trips to Giarbaldi, Netarts and Wilipa Bay. However, I would not take it to open water either in the ocean or any where down around Astoria/Illwaco. It just not enough boat for that even on calm days. Seeing it brings back alot of good memories. Good luck finding the right boat for you!
 
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