IFish Fishing Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a 16' Westcoaster w/40 hp outboard. It has never seen salt. When I use it in the bays are there any steps I should take prior to bringing it back to the Columbia river. The boat and motor are late '80's vintage. YES! I am excited.
Mike
 

· Vendor
Joined
·
9,593 Posts
Westcoasters are great boats. I had a 1986 15 footer with a tiller-steer Evinrude 25 on it, always in Salt Water (mostly when I lived in San Diego). After 16 years, I sold it for what I paid for it. For its size, it was a very seaworthy hull.

One thing to be aware of is the bow has a tendency to dig in and swerve off to the side, especially in a following sea. You've got to keep a firm hand on the steering.

Have fun.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,675 Posts
The zincs should be cleaned frequently to keep them active. Oxide retards their protection. Anti corrosion spray on bare metal under the cowl will save you head aches. Search Corrosion X in the salty dogs.

Rinse and flush every thing that sees any salt air.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,615 Posts
I just bought a 16' Westcoaster w/40 hp outboard. It has never seen salt. When I use it in the bays are there any steps I should take prior to bringing it back to the Columbia river. The boat and motor are late '80's vintage. YES! I am excited.
Mike
The following is not intended to diminish your enthusiasm; saltwater fishing, including bays, is fun and opens a whole bunch of new things to do. Saltwater and salt air just up the maintenance needed on boats and trailers. BTW, I've always admired the cut of Westcoaters, great boats for fishing. So ...

Do not forget to maintain your trailer very well too. Even galvanized trailers will get some corrosion, and if you have brakes, the salt water will take a toll on their components. If it is a painted trailer, it will rust and all you can do it minimize, and delay, the damage. Salt-Away, Salt Terminator, or similar products do a good job of 'killing" the salt inside and outside the boat, and in the nooks and crannies on the trailer.

Electrical wiring on the trailer, will also take a beating too. I've had good success by thoroughly sealing all exposed wires, like the area where a terminal is crimped to the wire, with Liquid Electrical Tape so salt water/air can not penetrate. I also apply a liberal coating of Dielectric Grease to all bulbs/lamps, lamp sockets, and metal plates on the trailer lights. This not only greatly reduces the time it takes for the lights and bulbs to corrode, and makes it a bit easier time getting them out of the socket, and without destroying the socket.

"Corrosion Block" or a similar product does a good job of minimizing the corrosion of various metal areas, such as the electrical connections on a buss block, even the snaps for a boat top you may have, and any number of other areas that saltwater or salt air can affect.

Many aluminum boats will get little white specks on their bare metal; in my experience, lots of them. Many years ago I quit worrying about it because the effort to remove them was extremely labor intensive, and only lasted until the next trip to salt water. There are some processes to keep the aluminum clean and shiny, and you can do a search on Ifish for how others do it. Ifish searches for "Sharkhide" and "galvanic corrosion" should get you some reading and educational information.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top