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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I fish the Willamette, and try to be polite to the other fishermen and boaters. During a recent anchor set, I got a loud objection from an upstream-anchored fisherman (approximately 80 yards directly upstream) that he was fishing this area, and that we should not anchor below him. He insisted that if he hooked a fish, he should be able to release his anchor and drift down with the fish, and that we should stay out of his way.

My question is this: "How much river should an anchored fisherman expect to control?" Aren't all boaters subject to rules of the road, and maintaining control of their vessels? It seems ludicrous to me that anyone should expect unobstructed drift passage downstream in a crowded waterway such as the Willamette. Am I truly off base on this?
 

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MBR,
I had this happen last fall near government island. It was a boat already anchored in front of a hog line. So I pulled up and dropped anchor, then started to drift back into the existing hog line below. The boat upstream from me (filled w/ 3 guys and too much alcohol) started screaming that I was in there way. They said they would cut my anchor line if they lost their fish in it. Lots of swearing from them and I just ignored it. That was the only time I've had that happen. I think most people on the rivers are considerate but that 1 or 2% just stands out.
 

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Here is a hint: If there are established hoglines immediately above and below you, you will probably not be warmly welcomed when you try to drop between them.

The distance between lines varies. On the outside of Sand Island the lines can be placed very close together. There (and places like there) you are expected to pull your fish into the main river to fight.

Several places in the Willie have lines almost completely accross the river. Pulling your fish to the side is not an option. Even with 200yds between lines I have ended up netting fish far closer to the downstream line than I would have liked.

Springers can be strong fighters. Give guys room to fight big fish. :wink:

[ 04-09-2003, 10:28 PM: Message edited by: crabbait ]
 

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80 yards sounds a bit close to me too.

In the Willamette I would look for established hog lines and stick to them.

If you want to fish anchored alone there's plenty of spots on the Columbia.

Those pre existing hog lines are usually in a spacific spot for a reason, they are were the fish will be coming through.
 

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Originally posted by MBR:


My question is this: "How much river should an anchored fisherman expect to control?" Aren't all boaters subject to rules of the road, and maintaining control of their vessels? It seems ludicrous to me that anyone should expect unobstructed drift passage downstream in a crowded waterway such as the Willamette. Am I truly off base on this?
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">Don't think of it as control, think of it as cooperation for a mutual goal. If everybody fishes this way, more people will be able to fish in a single area, with less trouble and stress.

I fished an area recently where a breakdown in this order made fishing worse for everybody. In this area, the lines that form are about 150 yards apart. This is pretty close, but it works out, because you can drag your fish out into the river. Recently, however, I got out there on a day when everybody there had anchored single file, about 75 yards apart. Six boats filled the space where normally 3 lines of 5 to 7 boats can form. They completely tied up the spot, reducing access for everyone else, and yet had screwed it up for themselves, because they all had risk of tangling in the boat below. Everyone had their gear working in someone's anchor line. It was ludicrous!

The better thing for them to have done, would have been to line up with boats that had arrived first. But they obvious had it in their head that only the depth of 24.27564378 feet would do to catch salmon, which just isn't the case. So they goobered their own fishing, and that of others. If one wanted to be critical, this behavior is much more controlling of the river than the fellow you described.

You question implies some lack of understanding of common practice in fighting these fish. It is definitely common practice to be able to drift down with a fish. This is not "controlling the river", it is using the common river space. Or at least, that's the common practice. It's a good practice, because it increases the chance of landing the fish, and allows the fishermen next to you to continue fishing.

As to the poste above how discused the drunks threatening to cut his line if they caught a fish, I have noticed that the people who catch fish regularly, know to join the hogline. Not a threat that would concern me.
 

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I had a problem w/a hog line yesterday too. I was anchoring on the OUTSIDE of the hog line, The OLD FARTS in the line told me I couldn't anchor there because I wasn't there @ 4:00 a.m. with them. I told them that was why I was anchoring on the end of the line and not anywhere in the middle. They just kept telling me to find a different line and to get off their river. WHO'S RIVER? :mad:

I wasn't the only one who tried to anchor there either. A man w/his two kids were shunned off too. I told to the guy to come down where I was going to anchor down and that he and his kids were welcome there. It's a big river and those fish have to come to that point anyway. And that he didn't have to expose his kids to such nasty and exploited behavior. :mad:

Me on the other hand had a good mind to anchor down anyway just to brown them off.


This is the line just at the bottome of Meldrum Bar. I think we all should go invade their territory, just to make a statement. :mad:

[ 04-12-2003, 08:26 PM: Message edited by: crabbait ]
 

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Very good advice re: sticking to established hoglines. These lines have been in the same spot for years, and things actually work quite well when people go with the flow. This way there's room for hoglines, backbouncers and backtrollers.

An increasing problem I've seen the last few years is people anchoring all over the place, not realizing (or caring) how they're affecting other people. Last year was the worst I've ever seen.

There are some idiots out there for sure (just like any place), but I've also met some of the nicest old farts you'd ever want to meet out there too! :smile:
 

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I do agree that setting up in traditional hog lines and respecting those areas are the preferred method for newbies. However, many years ago I was fishing the Willamette for a full week. I put in at dark and went to the spot I have fished for many years. Three days straight, the same boat is in the same location I have fished. It was there when I got there and when I left every night just at dark. Long days but worth the effort. So, I assumed that(and I was right) that they were staying overnight in the same spot and holding it. Well, I show up the fourth day early again. This time I anchor downstream at least a 125 yards down. It's my boat and this boat and that is all there is in this area. As soon as I get settled and throw out the spinner I hear yelling. I look upstream and this guy and his buddy are yelling and looking at me with binoculars. I wave back and shrug my shoulders to them. Back to fishing I go. Then about 10 minutes pass and this one guy had walked down the bank across from where I was anchored. He yells "your in my water and blocking my drift". I just told the guy to make like the creator and to walk on water over to my boat if he had a problem. After that episode I was getting junk floating down into where I was fishing, cheetos, baggies etc. What a bunch of idiots. I just held my ground and came back two more days just for the fun of it. Nobody owns the river period.
 

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Got a big time reality check on the Clack yesterday.
I love fishing with the sleds when there are no drift boats but when there's a bunch of drifters it's just plain combat fishing and a big race to get to the next hole and the tension gets high
Was cut off and followed all day long, probably why we only caught one fish. Was having great success early in the week but when there's guys cutting you off all day it just isn't fun. I'm just looking for excuses for my poor day I guess. :smile:
 

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ARRRRGH!!!!

Now I know why I have been taking days off during the week to fish!

Today (Saturday) we took the S.S. Rarin' To Go out by Sand Island for some good 'ole springer fishing.

Let me tell you, it is going to be awhile before I go out on a Saturday again.

First off, dude next to us gets a fish on, they don't drop out. When we ask if they are going to, they say No, we would drift into the line behind us...Then they lost the fish. Again, it was a ski boat, and the minute the weather got a bit nasty, they took off.

Then, a alumninum fishing boat with I think three generations of family members pulls in next to us. Normally not a problem, but they were RIGHT next to us. Clown Mouth said something to them and they said, "You want us to move?"
No, we wanted you fishing in our boat this afternoon...jeez.

Saturdays are crazy this time of year. I guess I will start working four 10-hour shifts so I can avoid the river whackos...

Thanks to Clown Mouth for keeping an eye on things today and trying to keep us fishing. Even though we didn't do any catching, it was still a nice day on the river...even with the crazy people out there....

I just wish people would be considerate...is that so much to ask?
 

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Chacal, Thats ok, a boat in the hog line below where you were had put his anchor out above our hog line. 350' of anchor line out is a bit too much for 25' of water. :hoboy:
 

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One day my buddy and I fished Washougal for sturgon an got there early just to anhor in this one spot. ABout 30 min later the only other boat on the river decided to come and drop about 50 feet behind our boat. :hoboy: When we said something the guys replid that they had been fishing this river sence we were in diapers. :mad:
So we moved down along side them but about 60 more fet into the channel and proceeded to catch fish faster then we wver had before. :smile: By the days end we kept 2 nice keepers and threw another 4 or 5 keepers back not to mention about 40 shakers. The other guys maybe boated 3 shakers all day and sat and watched us school everyone else all day long. :bowdown: :cool: When we left the speed that those guys moved to our spot was almost lightning fast. I guess that those 2% better watch who they decide yell at net time. :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
First, thanks for the feedback on this topic. It is interesting that many assumed that I was anchoring below a "hog line". I was not. I was anchoring 80-100 yards below one boat, next to Cedar Oak Island, near the West Linn boat ramp.

The "hog line" mentality assumes a few things that I disagree with. First, that anyone can claim any space on the river to himself.

We are all subject to the rules of the road and some common courtesy. Anyone claiming otherwise should get off the river.

I am not a "newbie" to fishing on the river, or any other body of water. Common courtesy usually suffices. If I am too close to the guy upstream, I should recognize that. This was two boats, 80-100 yards apart, fishing 30 feet off the shoreline. I was not crowding a hog line.

Second, people in hog lines seem to assume that anyone anchoring downstream, or arriving after daybreak must give way to their position. I am not going to go looking for this fight, but what makes these people think they own the river?

If you fish a hog line, that is your choice. But nobody has special water rights because they fish that way. I appreciate the comment regarding river customs - fighting fish in these circumstances creates special customs. People anchored in a hog line need to cast off to fight and land the fish, otherwise all other lines in the hog line may get tangled in the fight. But, boats safely anchored downstream of the hog line should not have a greater or lesser burden than any other vessel on the water.

Finally, if you are fishing with kids, the last place you want to be is close to one of these hog lines. Kids hear and see everything. The language and behavior I have seen in hog lines (a few loudmouth drunks can spoil everything) convinces me that solitary anchoring is the best alternative with children anglers in the boat. Trolling with kids does not work, due to gear and boat management issues.

Once again, thanks for your input. I haven't changed my opinion as a result of this dialogue, but I do have a better understanding of other peoples expectations.

Best Regards,
MBR
 
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