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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The 10' drifter ("float me alone") is going to get an overhaul well before winter. Bone dry rite now, so a good time to get it ready.

A few Questions.

Whats the best application for the bottom?

Whats the best overall wood treatment/sealer?

Is there any good reason I would not want to put a "rhino-lining" on the interior floor?

Grassyass amigoz
 

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Thompson's water seal is a good bet for seam sealing. Also for the bottom, just use a light coat of Glov-it. You can also use special marine epoxy paint for around the seams or I'd use it as your first coat. Sort of like a primer. Do not use the Rhino lining on the interior bottom as it does not adhere very well to the wood. just flakes right off. Use skateboarders tape or sprinkle some sand of the bottom when the paint is tacky.
 

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if she's seaworthy now and will make it ok to next summer, put it off till then. first, it'll take longer than you think. second, life has a way of ruining "the best laid plans of mice and men". right now, i'll be doing good to get a shoddy job done on my restoration project before the rains set in, much less the job i really want to do with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ive heard a lot about this gluv-it. Will have to take a closer look. Is it solvent based?

The thompsons sounds a little like a concern with the following treatment I would opt for instead. My grandfather used to have me treat his wood ladders once a year with one part turpentine, and one part linseed oil mixed. They lasted forever and a day. The thought has crossed my mind, but the ladders always had a bit of a greasy feel afterwards and Im afraid a sealer wont adhere after a linseed/turpentine treatment. Also concerned about the oils in the river if I cannot seal it adequately. Im sure theres superior products out there.
The sand or abrassive tape is a good idea.

Good point amp... I hear ya. I built a canoe which was supposed to be used the following summer, and the project lasted almost 10 years. (with impecable results mind you) I hate to admit I sold it afterwards, but...eh, whats done is done.

[ 08-18-2003, 08:37 PM: Message edited by: Row Vs. Wade ]
 

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Mix epoxy and graphite together and then spread over the boat bottom. You will get a super hard, super strong and extremely slick surface that will not crack or stick to rocks.

When you spread it use a 8-12" flat putty knife (plastic). The more coats you put on the better the result you will get litely sand and wash between coats). Also with thinner coats you have less of a chance of runs down the sides of your boat.
 

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for the bottom, a mix of epoxy and graphite. there was a wood drift boat refurb project detailed here a while back. i'm sure he'd give you pointers.

for the inside, spar varnish or tung oil. wood needs to be able to breathe. if you seal it up, water will still get in but it won't get out. sure bet for rot.
 

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Ok,

I have another stupid question.

The dory dudes sprayed on some oil mix that would keep their boats salt proof( hey if it is ok with saltwater, freshwater should be fine too). If memory serves, it was not the most PC stuff to use. But it worked very well.

Why not use some on a drifter( besides the "It wont be as pretty as 4 coats of hand rubbed oil would be"). I am a slob-redneck. I am also lazy on an extremely high level. Why refinish when you can spray on some more juice from an empty 409 bottle?

mark and the carnuba waxed dog.

[ 08-19-2003, 08:08 AM: Message edited by: Flatfish ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mark and "this weeks Jeapardy champion" dog:

"Another stupid question"?

Im guessing this wasnt meant to read as it did. Now if Stew wrote it...different story.

JK Stew...havnt seen a (thought) provoking post from you in a while, are you on that high-bran diet again?

Speaking of bran, Muslix or grapenutts on the boats floor? Should bind up those wadin boots pretty good.

[ 08-18-2003, 10:52 PM: Message edited by: Row Vs. Wade ]
 

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I wouldn't use thompsons on boats. It's not intended for marine use.

There are two types of things you're trying to do with marine wood. Either you're trying to stabilize and strengthen it, or you're trying to seal it. I'm not an expert, but it looks like thompson's is a sealer. That's fine, as good as it goes, but using a marine epoxy approach (West, System One) will seal and strengthen the top layer. The best approach is to use one of these finishes, perhaps enhanced by a layer of fiberglas, and then finishing with a paint of some sort to block UV light from degrading the finish. Top of the line are the linear polyurethane finishes. Just bring money - I think they're about 35 bucks a quart. Yup, a quart. But they are the kind for protecting the boat.

For the bottom, a great finish is to lay a base of two layers of glass cloth using epoxy as a bonder. Then mix a batch of epoxy and powdered graphite (available from The Wooden Boat Shop in Seattle). You use about a cup of graphite in a pint of epoxy. This goes on like a thick paint, and sets up in a tough, slick, steathy finish.

We did this on our wood boat. Did the bottom once when we built the boat, 10 years ago, and it's still going strong. Did the clear wood work using the epoxy and LPU finish eight years ago, and it's also held up well.
 

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RvW,

I asked several stupid questions last nite. It is me, not anyone else, doing the asking. I really mean the dory thing. If it keeps a dory safe from the sea, why would it not work on a drifter. Ask the PC guys. They may know.

Mark and the wax on....wax off dog.
 

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I think it's time I weigh in on this :wink:
If the wood is good and dry, coating the boat inside and out with epoxy is not a problem. "encapsulizing" with epoxy is a widely accepted practice in wood boat building. Epoxy is kind of bear to work with though. It wants to sag and drip, especially in warm weather. Working on the inside of a boat, with frames and seats in the way is even more of a pain.

If I were to do it again I would probably use teak oil. It is much easier to work with and seals the wood from moisture. It's not as tough as epoxy, but if it begins to wear thru you can just add another coat. The oiled wood look is also very attractive.

On the bottom and up the sides, go with fiberglass reinforced epoxy. When the fiberglass is "wetted" properly, it will go translucent. Not quite transparent, but not bad. You can still see the grain of the wood fairly well. One layer of fiberglass/epoxy and another coat of epoxy on top of that should be plenty. I think the graphite additives are overkill. Epoxy is very hard and slick all on its own.

Another thing to remember. I think it was brought up in a previous post. Epoxy is not UV resistant. Over time, depending on exposure to sunlight, it will develop a haze. To remedy this, you need to add a UV resistant coating. I use 4 or 5 coats marine spar varnish. There are several "poly" products on the market that will add a clear UV resistant finish. Just be sure that they are compatable with epoxy. As epoxy cures it leaves a chemical behind known as "amine haze". Most of the time you can't even see it, but is will prevent some some paints and clear finishes from bonding.

My .02 :cheers:
 

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Originally posted by Row Vs. Wade:
The 10' drifter ("float me alone") is going to get an overhaul well before winter. Bone dry rite now, so a good time to get it ready.

A few Questions.

Whats the best application for the bottom? Glovet

Whats the best overall wood treatment/sealer? CPES Search " Rot Doctor " on the Internet

Is there any good reason I would not want to put a "rhino-lining" on the interior floor?

Because there are better materials but you could use it if you pretreat the wood with CPES.


All this depends on what you want to do with the boat, I don't mean where you want to go fishing but how far you want to go with preserving it. If you want to do basic maintenance use a wood preservative on the inside, assuming it hasn't already been painted. ( Bad Idea to paint inside ). Paint the outside with a quality boat paint such as Unilux Marine paint. I prefere a sprayer. And coat the bottom with Glovet. It is the cheapest and easiest to apply but only last a season. But It really allows you to slide over rocks.

If you want to spend money and make a show boat that is a different matter.
The guys at the wooden boat show seem to like Three step.

See my Woody
http://www.ifish.net/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=024129#000000

I used a product called Clear Penatrating Epoxy Sealer. or CPES. It is spendy ! But if you want to do a really good job that will last a long time use CPES. It is the Only thing I would apply to the interior of my boat. BTW. If your boat isn't painted on the inside and you want to bring the original color back to the interior of your boat use " Oxalic Acid" . It is a wood bleach and it is amazing. I just used it to clean up my Gunwales and some spilled inside the boat. So I went ahead and washed all the bulkheads with it. Dang ! The boat has Thirty years of rain, Sweat and Salmon Blood all over it and now it looks like brand new plywood.

Yep ! You can accomplish just about anything you want with that boat and there are alot of ways to go about it. It's just a matter of money and time. Wouldn't you rather spend it fishing ?
If you want to know more ask ? BTW you can by a floor material at Fishermans marine supply. It is not a carpet material but you apply it with Weatherproof Carpet Glue. I used it on the Duds Plug and it looks and works great. It is a None slip material. Cost about $20.00 per yd
on a six foot roll.

Sorry ! I love talking about wooden boats.

Grassyass amigoz
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[ 08-19-2003, 10:34 AM: Message edited by: Abalone ]
 

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i would go with coat-it instead of glove-it on the bottom,me and fishingusa just refubished our wood drift boat and love the way the bottom came out with coat-it we did 2 coats just for added protection,,,on the outside of the hull we put on 5 coats of marine spar varnish and came out great with plenty of uv protection,also it does take a lot longer than your thinking me and buddy found that out,with both of us working on it, youll just keep on finding places that just need a little bit more work until you finally say enough is enough and put some varnish on it
 

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opps forgot if you use the search you will see out finished boat and i think a picture of the bottom this coat-it has graphite kevlar added to it so its slick and hard pretty easy to work with as long as you have 2 people on it cause when first applied it is runny but starts to set pretty quick
 

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I've used Pettit Easypoxy on the hull, exterior Verathane on the top deck, and ... on the interior ... Miller Acri-Lite exterior house paint! Easypoxy on the inside below the waterline.

Verathane looks great, holds up great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all the input folks.

I think I will do a hurry up job for now, and really dig in in the spring to restore this 10' Don Hill minidrifter. Im still tossing the idea around of tearing it down and using it for a pattern to make a replica, and a larger one too...I have the skills and most of the tools...just not too experiences with finishes in a marine application. Either way this info will be valuable for both retoration and a new boat too.
Its not in bad shape, but I have a tendancy to make and keep things in tip top condition.

I forgot the persons moniker who I purchased this boat from here, need to ask a few questions EG whats on the bottom now, how to get it off (whats left of it) etc. I think the "for sale" post was deleted.

Thanks again for the time spent replying...things like this make IFish awesome.
 

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amine blush can and should be washed away with detergent before subsequent coats of anything are applied.

lost sailor: how'd you like the paint finish on the inside? i was planning to use porch paint on the inside of my fiberglass drifter because it's self primering and is designed to give a more durable finish.
 

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Ampersat, I'd make sure to try that paint out on your car first. :wink:
 

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um, i don't get it.
 

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I recommend overlaying the bottom and sides with .125 aluminum and welding the corner seams! HAHAHAHAHAHA! Boy that brings back memories! I miss my woody. Oh no, wait there it is!.
GOOD LUCK!
 
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