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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's an issue for the mechanically inclined:

My '95 Chevy K1500 is having difficulty meeting the hydrocarbon standards at the friendly neighborhood DEQ test station. After running it through twice today (the second time after driving for 20 minutes on the freeway) I decided that I needed to regroup and go back with a strategy to pass.

I've heard that there are some "shortcuts" to just get you by, but I'd like to think that I can also make some real improvements in fuel efficiency, performance and air quality along the way.

What are your experiences and what do you suggest?
 

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The local scrap iron yard is paying .32 a lb. for scrap. How much does that pig weigh? Sorry, I couldn't help myself. When was the last time the spark plugs were changed? All filters, air and fuel? I am not a mechanic, but thats the first things I would do. I know you will find someone here to help with more specifics.
 

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If it's just over, take it to a different DEQ station. Equipment calibration may be different. One time I took a rig to three different test stations and I could not believe the difference in the results. If my memory serves, it was on the order of +/- 20%. :hoboy:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The HC standard is 220 ppm and it came in the first idle at 244. After they revved it and tested the second idle, it was at 340.:passout:

I spoke with a NAPA guy later and he said that you want to roll right into a test unit, not wait in line--which builds your score, I think. He also said that revving to about 2500 rpm while you're waiting helps, too.

I've got new plugs and a little magic potion to try, along with a tank of Chevron Supreme, which, I'm told, does actually make a difference.

We'll see next time around. Any further help will still be appreciated.:help:
 

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Revving your engine will definitely help if you have a catalytic converter (you should have one). It keeps it nice and hot (works best that way), just like a drive on the freeway would. At idle your exhaust temps are only 800-900 degrees, but at 2500rpm they will be around 1400.

I guarantee you will pass hydrocarbons with less timing and no other modifications. It has the same effect as revving your engine. The later the cylinders fire, the less time there is for the heat to dissipate before it enters the exhaust system.
 

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R e t a r d the timing a few degrees. This will drop hydrocarbons like a bad habit.

(The word police doesn't like that first word)
:yeahthat: took a few passes with the 94 Mitsubishi to pick that up. You can bump it back for performance after the man gives you the nod.

Good time to change the plugs, dist cap, rotor, air filter etc while yer in there.
 
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