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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone once posted asking what those old pilings are from. There were several answers provided... but I don't recall seeing this explanation:

"Gill net fishing on the Columbia River showing wooden poles set in the river bed supporting the nets. The photograph is from the records of the Pacific Northwest Regional Planning Commission, 1934-1938, which assisted state planning commisssions in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana on issues concerning the protection of the Columbia River fisheries, drainage basins, and the Columbia Gorge. (Oregon State Planning Board Records, Pacific Northwest Regional Planning Commission Records, Columbia River Fisheries Committee Records, separated photograph from box 20, folder 10, OPB0014)"

[ 05-02-2003, 08:22 AM: Message edited by: Pilar's Mate ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here's another:


"Fishing on the Columbia River. The horses were used to draw in the fishing nets that were cast into the river by fishermen in boats. The photograph is from the records of the Pacific Northwest Regional Planning Commission, which assisted state planning commissions in the Northwest on issues concerning the protection of the Columbia River fisheries, drainage basins, and the Columbia Gorge. (Oregon State Planning Board Records, Pacific Northwest Regional Planning Commission Records, Columbia River Fisheries Committee Records, separated photograph from box 20, folder 10, OPB0015)"
 

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That first pic looks like a wing dam down around Clatskanie that I saw recently :shocked:
 

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GRB, they did not have the Marine Mammal protection act back then. So it was ok?

Thanks again for spotting that net. We will stay on the OSP until they get it out.
 

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PM: Those look like net pens, not gill nets. The mesh on them is tiny and would only gill something probably less than 5" long if that. They may have been for storing seined fish until transport arrived.
 

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PM: I blew the picture up and recognized it as a fish trap. I outlined the top of the trap and the throat.

 

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alot of the pilings had canneries sitting on them as well. They even had 2 story canneries on sand bars out in the middle of the river. The 2nd story was for the horses so they could get out of the water when the tide came in :shocked:
 

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All the pilings around Chinook were used for fish traps as well. They're still the best type of harvest tool for the commercials when regards to "marked" fish only regulations.
 

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Excellent--i know i posted a question awhile back about these--

Now, i have another question though
what the heck do some people call them dolphins?--last year, a guy up at bonni asked me if i was casting around the dolpine-not knowing what he was talking about, i said, "ahh no, i havn't seen any dolphins, some seals, but I don't think I intentionally cast near one"-- he shook his head, mumlbed something and walked away--

so--why dolphins?
 

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This whole discussion is interesting. Thanks for handing down a bit of our rich fishing history.
 

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I think that the term "Dolfins" might be for the 3 wooden poles that are banded together at the top, thus forming a pyramid shaped tower used for tying up log rafts for the logging/paper mills on the Columbia in the old days. At the Camas
/Washougal marina where the abandoned Parkerhouse restaurant sits, used to be the old"Dolphin" restaurant. My Uncle Noel Bright use to own it. I'm not sure if the restaurant was named after that particular type of piling.You can still see dolfins in the Columbia below the Camas paper mill between little Ackerman island and the Washington shore.
 

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This is very interesting cause I've always wondered what the pilings were about. My question has nothing to do with the Columbia River but it is related to remnant wooden structure sticking out of the water. So here goes:

What is the history behind what I believe is called the "picket fence" on the upper end of Tillamook Bay?
 

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alot of these pilinge you see have numbers like dolphin 50 these are check points for navigation if you want specifics on these, contact the barge lines. when the river was deeper they used these pilings it tie up barges
 

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Originally posted by Born to Fish:

What is the history behind what I believe is called the "picket fence" on the upper end of Tillamook Bay?
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">BTF- They had piling/piers in a cuple of spots in the middle of T-bay during WWII and had small navy ships tied up to them. It was obviousley just a little deeper then.
:cheers:
 
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