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Thanks all! Duck hunting around here has become such a cluster, I'm looking for some solitude as much as anything.
I admit, I did finally get a camo/plastic Franchi a few years back. I was shopping for black plastic, but Sportsman's Warehouse had such a great deal, I went with camo. As far as upland guns, I got it covered. Heck, I still have enough lead shells to put a bunch of holes in the sky.

Thanks again.

Keep it coming!
 

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Wreckless,
A nice retriever would work very well for you also. Just as " versatile" as a versatile, hunt anything you want. You will likely kill just as many chukars as you would with a pointy dog. Ive been doing it with retrievers for over 40 years. You'll have a nice waterfowl dog and it wont ruin your eyes when you look at it!!!

The key to chukar hunting is taking the dog to the correct area.
I've hunted chukars with well trained flushing dogs for 20 years, followed by the same with setters. The terrain covered by flushers is restrictive and limited due to keeping them in gun range, especially compared to big running pointing dogs. There is no comparison to the success I've had with pointing dogs. I've found WAY more birds and haven't had to hack them to stay in gun range. If you're hunting a preserve, or an area where you know birds are concentrated, maybe they would compete. Pheasant on the other hand changes my perspective, as flushers are ideal. Every breed of hunting dog has their positives and negatives . The last thing I want to do is hunt wide open country with widely dispersed birds and a dog that I have to keep inside 40 yards.
 

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47sgs
To each his own, Ive hunted with them all, never felt undergunned with retrievers hunting chukars. In fact I was shocked many years ago when I read an article in Outdoor life where the guy said you had to have a big running dog to hunt chukars. Pretty shocking, I had been killing a lot of chukars and generally doing better than the pointer guys I hunted with. It has nothing to do with terrain the dogs cover. It has everything to do with taking the dog where the birds are and the birds holding. Neither of those things require a big running pointer.
I have thousands of hunter days of comparisons. ( hunter day would be observing a hunter in the field, You and I hunt together for two days, would be 4 hunter days.). These hunter days include almost all styles of hunting dogs. Individual days , small group days, large group days. Dechuttes to Brownlee, to Ohwhyee and back. Hunting pointers and retrievers together, oh what a sin!!!

The fact that you prefer to hunt with a big ranging dog does not provide any evidence that its more efficient than hunting with a flushing breed. Finding way more birds is meaning less if they are not sitting there when you arrive. No matter what breed, we all have to get into range. Dog merely finding birds doesnt mean you get to shoot at all of them. (read back through this post the evidence is right here) If a pointer was required for a person to get into gun range, then us flusher guys would never shoot anything. In fact if the stupid things just flew as soon as they saw us nobody would kill anything. So there must be some survival trait that tells them they should sit. And how I can get close enough to kill them. I have a pretty good theory as to what it is but not going to take time now to explain it all.
Heading out next week for the first trip. Good group this year, most of the guys have pointing breeds. I can tell you right now from experience it is very likely that the majority of them will do better then me. But thats because they are going to walk more than me. I cant keep up with these young guys, quit trying!
 

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47sgs
To each his own, Ive hunted with them all, never felt undergunned with retrievers hunting chukars. In fact I was shocked many years ago when I read an article in Outdoor life where the guy said you had to have a big running dog to hunt chukars. Pretty shocking, I had been killing a lot of chukars and generally doing better than the pointer guys I hunted with. It has nothing to do with terrain the dogs cover. It has everything to do with taking the dog where the birds are and the birds holding. Neither of those things require a big running pointer.
I have thousands of hunter days of comparisons. ( hunter day would be observing a hunter in the field, You and I hunt together for two days, would be 4 hunter days.). These hunter days include almost all styles of hunting dogs. Individual days , small group days, large group days. Dechuttes to Brownlee, to Ohwhyee and back. Hunting pointers and retrievers together, oh what a sin!!!

The fact that you prefer to hunt with a big ranging dog does not provide any evidence that its more efficient than hunting with a flushing breed. Finding way more birds is meaning less if they are not sitting there when you arrive. No matter what breed, we all have to get into range. Dog merely finding birds doesnt mean you get to shoot at all of them. (read back through this post the evidence is right here) If a pointer was required for a person to get into gun range, then us flusher guys would never shoot anything. In fact if the stupid things just flew as soon as they saw us nobody would kill anything. So there must be some survival trait that tells them they should sit. And how I can get close enough to kill them. I have a pretty good theory as to what it is but not going to take time now to explain it all.
Heading out next week for the first trip. Good group this year, most of the guys have pointing breeds. I can tell you right now from experience it is very likely that the majority of them will do better then me. But thats because they are going to walk more than me. I cant keep up with these young guys, quit trying!
Back when I started hunting chukars, about 50 years ago, there were SO many more birds. The shorthairs we had were not well trained, and I quickly abandoned the rest of the hunting party to walk by myself, no dog. By walking where the birds wanted to be I averaged well over 200 birds a day flushed, almost all in range. Under those conditions a flusher does fine! Today, most of the areas I hunt have far fewer birds, widely distributed. If I find 4-5 coveys it's a good day. The wirehairs are allowed to range as far as they wish, with GPS collars. Most points are over 200 yards away, and not on my line of travel. In addition, the birds like to run. The pointers pin them and wait for you to show up! Hunting without a dog, or with a close-working flusher, I would not expect a single shot opportunity on half the days. I'm sure there are still a few places flushers will work, like walking the snow line above Brownly. I'm too old for the really steep stuff anymore, the gentler country doesn't concentrate the birds in predictable areas.

As far as roosters, my hunting buddy is bach in Montana right now, has been there all season. The flusher guys are crying the blues, cause the roosters are thin and running/flushing way wild. His wirehair hunts lighter cover, circles and pins birds, they come up at his toes. Easy limits while the lab guys are skunked.
 

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I have hunted both. Started with labs after them 20+ years ago. Love labs but I went to GSP's about 10 years ago. Wont look back. I may be spoiled but I expect limits each time I go out. I get that more often than not with the GSP. And I don't get around as well as I did when I started chasing these things 20 years ago. So don't want to walk unproductive ground if I don't have to. If I was trying to get someone into chukar hunting I would not tell them to use flushers. Pointers all the way. I did have success with my labs no doubt. But more and easier success with my pointers. Plus watching them catch scent and work the birds and point is absolutely incredible. No one will change my mind
 

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The problem I always had was compromise. I was raised hunting pheasants in the valley. So as the pheasant died out in the valley so did my bird hunting. Took my Dad on his last trip and mine in Yamhill county before Dad passed 40+ years ago. 30+ years ago a friend of mine was promoted to park ranger to over seeing several parks on the east side. When we talked on the phone he told me about all of the peasant hunting in his area and chukars. I went over to visit and walked the hills alone with out a dog. Got permission on many of the farms to hunt pheasants and had a great time. Then I had to decide on a dog. My wife wanted a dog like the one on Funny Farm and because I was raised a pheasant hunter we went with a black lab. Like said above there is nothing more special than when a dog works a scent but my lab would burrow into the mess of brush after the bird. When we would take my friends pointers they would sit on the outside of the brush pile and point that there was a bird in there. But when we went into the hills after the chukars the pointers would win out. But my lab would still get birdy and tell me there were birds up in front of me and to get ready.
 

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The few labs I have hunted with/around couldn't cut the mustard do to there size and weight. The shale tore there feet up somthing fierce and they would run out of gas long before the hunt was up. Short hairs have been In my sites for the last 40 years I have chukar hunted and seem to hold up well.
 

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But more and easier success with my pointers. Plus watching them catch scent and work the birds and point is absolutely incredible. No one will change my mind
Agree 100%. When I was younger and could keep up with the fast moving flushers I had, it was fun and successful. Now I'm older , let the dogs cover country I don't have to unless they find birds, and watching a fast moving setter slam on point overrides how many I kill anymore by a long ways. It's also just more efficient and successful hunting for me now.

I just returned from 2 weeks in E Montana hunting pheasant, Huns and Sharptails. The only problem I had is if the dogs pointed pheasant in extremely heavy cover and I had to go in. Otherwise, it was awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Did the long hunt yesterday with a friend and his Griff, really taxed this old body. Found a few birds everywhere we went but shot opportunities for me didn't happen. First time my pup hunted with another dog and that didn't go well. She wanted to run and play for the first couple of hours, other dog wanted to hunt, plus other problems. He's a bigger runner (he covered 40.8 miles on the tracker) than she is so helped to draw her out farther than hunting on her own. This is a good thing. Thinking it's about time I put the tracker/locator on her. My feet hurt.....
 

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Made it out today. Def a lack of birds in the area. Second time to this region and seeing half normal #s. Only found two coveys. and a few scattered birds. Beautiful day, almost too hot, but not quite. DZ a. dog doing 40 miles in a day is nuts ours logged logged about 18, we had 4 on the ground today. Two ugly ones and my two pretty ones. Hoping to head back out this weekend
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Dave: He says his dog generally does three times what he does so that penciled out pretty close. We did 13 on his personal tracker.
 

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Our experience was like Maverik's the first 10 years we hunted chukars there were plenty of birds without dogs . Biggest problem was finding them after we shot them . So I got a Brittney and my son had a pointing lab . Real fun to see a lab backing up a Brittney point and vice verse . This worked great for us as the lab was a great nose to the ground and excellent retriever and the Brit always had his nose in the air and could smell those birds for 100 yrd and more at times . However the lab could go threw a set of booties in a 1/2 day of hunting . Now we have another Brittney and Lab but this lab is a flusher . Unable to hunt them together tho . I must say he seems to get more birds then me now tho .
 

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Took my GWP out to John Day canyon for a 3 day hunt this week. I’m new to chukar hunting so this was a learning experience for me. We usually hunt mountain quail and grouse in the coast range. We came across a few coveys but didn’t get off a shot. It was unseasonably warm with temps in low 60s. Couple of questions if you all don’t mind. 1st, I use OnX and so much of the BLM land of the canyon is buffered by private land. It seemed there was very little access where public roads actually gave one access. My map showed trails through the BLM land but it would require you to literally drive through a farmers field or basically through their driveway which I suspect is illegal so I moved on. Is this just part of scouting and finding access?
Second, i would like to review some resources about hunting strategy and tips. Can anyone recommend a good resource?
thank you in advance. I now understand how this can get addictive!
 

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Big tuna,
Want strategy and tips??? PM me, If I can kill chukars with a retriever, I must be good!. Chukerdave and Even Dogzilla could help since you have an un Ugly dog.
 
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Fell to second page. Cant have that. Again pointing pics eluded me. Quite skittish/educated birds and all seemed to be right on the edge of rather large cliffs. Didn't want to shoot and not be able to retrieve or have the new pup follow a dead bird so held off until I could corner a few in better access spots. My Friday 6 pack. Glad I beat the weather its awful out there today
 

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You guys and your chuckar hunting stories are awesome. I follow your thread religiously. The country where they live and the experience of pursuing them has always been a spectacular outing when I do go there.

I do not have hunting dogs in my life these days, so I focus more heavily on quail, pheasant and waterfowl in wadeable areas. I did hunt chuckar dogless on the JDR for a couple days in November.

After hunting all day long hiking to tops of canyons and plateaus and then all the way back down again without seeing a single bird, one ran across the road while driving back to camp!!!! It made it in the pot for dinner.

Next day I did 7.5 total miles of hiking along the river, and up to the top, and back down again. Flushed 2 coveys of 20 birds on the way up to the top - got 1 shot off and 1 dead bird. Crossed over several ridges to where the birds went. Flushed 20 again, probably one of the same coveys - got 1 shot off and no bird.

Then on the way back to camp literally within sight of the tent 3 birds flew and startled me from my stupor. Shot twice, missed both. Watched them fly up the hill and around a couple boulders half the size of a house. Not worth climbing up over the ledge and through the god awful terrain to get to them. Then again, why not? At least I knew there might birds at the end of that scramble; which being middle aged and super tired was frankly a little dangerous to do.

Having to lay my gun down more than once to use all 4s to get up there, I finally get within 20 yards of the giant boulders. No birds fly. I yell HEEYAW as loud as I can. A bird scrambles out literally from a pocket under the boulder up the hill and is just getting off the ground when I crumple him. Now it was worth it!

With all that commotion and shooting no way there are any birds under the next boulder 30 yards away to the side, right? I walk over there and along the base of this towering lone rock. I yell HEEYAW, again. No bird. Go to walk away and out comes another chuckar from a depression half under the rock. Bang. Dead bird.

I have now seen it all! Finishing the walk to camp I am lit up and ready for anything. In the final 300 yards at each patch of grass I yell YEEHAW at the top of my lungs. I am rewarded with a final flush. Bang, bang. A final dead bird.

Definitely a combination of hardwork and some good luck, with 4 birds in the bag it was my finest dogless chuckar hunting day ever!
 

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Your post makes me smile man! Nice job! I never knew that the Chuckar was national bird anywhere. What is its name in Packistan with translation please?
 
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