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Nice!! :cheers: What kind of shape were the crabs in? also if you don't mind sharing, where did you dig your clams? I crab and fish there all the time but have never even thought about clamming. How do you do it? Kinda looks like your out in front of the international docks.
 

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JUST GOT BACK FROM THERE AND GOT 6 KEEPERS. ONE IN THE RANGE OF 7" AND THEY ALL SEEMED TO BE IN GOOD SHAPE (NOT SOFT).AND IT ALSO BLEW US IN ALSO.
 

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Bendman,

Most of the crab were hard shell, or almost hard shell. We did catch one that was off the scale, but it was a soft shell. Luke wanted to keep it, so we did.

There are plenty of places to clam in the bay, but the open ocean beaches are closed for clamming right now. Keep in mind though, that you have to get there on a minus tide, the lower the better. We went on a -.76 tide. There is bank access under the bridge on both sides of the bay, and over by the big gas tank upstream from the Embarcadero. Get there about an hour before low tide, and clam until you get your limit or the incoming tide forces you to quit.

We had a boat, so you would want to try over by behind the Hatfield Science Center on the flats at low tide, if you have a boat. Really, anywhere in the lower bay where there is exposed sand at a minus tide, you will find some clams. You'll see others, if the tide is low enough. Go real close to the water, and look for a hole about the size of a quarter or more. Put your finger in the hole. If there is a gaper clam there, you will feel it pull away from you, or feel the suction of it pulling away from you. If you feel one pull away, dig down, and follow the hole. Gapers put their necks up to siphon salt water. Be careful digging, because they are usually one to two feet down. Keep checking the hole with your finger as you dig, because you don't want to cut the neck off, you'll loose half the meat. When you feel the neck, you are almost there. The neck will not go into the shell, but it sticks out several inches when retracted. Dig all around the clam, then work it out with your hand. Be careful not to cut the shell in half with your shovel. Also, be careful, because you will also find other clams on the way down about 1/3 of the time. We got some steamer clams and butter clams this way. Also, to find cockle clams, the ones with the "Ruffles potato chip" ridges, I just walk along in the eel grass near the water or actually in a few inches of water. When you feel something like a rock under your feet, reach down and see what it is. It will either be a rock, an empty shell, a stick, even a crab, or a clam. I kind of shuffle or drag my feet along the sand and eel grass until I feel something. Reach down and check it out. I like the cockles the best, they are the easiest to cleam in my opinion. The gapers have more meat, but the neck has a dark skin on them, that needs to come off.

To clean, you just drop the clams in boiling water a few at a time, until the shell pops open. Then drop the clam in cold water for just long enough to cool it down to touch. Then pull the clam from the shell, and clean away. I cut the stomachs open, and remove all the green stuff and stomach contents. But I keep pretty much everything else, the "lips" around the shell, the button that holds the shell together, the foot, the neck, and the whatever else parts are really good. Do a search on clamming in Oregon or clamming in Netarts, and you'll find all kinds of information.

Good luck, and let me know how you did when you find a minus tide. We clammed until we got our limit (four of us got 80 clams. The limit is 20 per person, of which not more than 12 of the 20 can be gapers also called horse necks). Then we crabbed the incoming tide but before high tide, we were blown off the water. I like to crab the incoming tide all through the high tide, if the wind cooperates.

I'm getting hungry just thinking about it. :cheers:

SKP
 

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We went to Newport the other day to clam and crab. I took my friend, Ralph, and his two boys Zach and Luke. Luke has leukemia. He will finish 39 months of chemo this September. All indications are that he has whipped this disease, Praise the Lord!!! So taking Luke out fishing or crabbing is very special to me and my family. Anyway, we got our limit of 80 clams, but only got 8 keeper size crab before the wind blew us off the bay. I have a 14 foot boat with only a 15 horse motor. I'm posting a few pictures of the trip. We also went to Suttle Lake on a church camp out and went kokanee fishing. I got skunked, but Luke caught several nice kokes, which I'll post kokanee pictures later.



This is our 54 quart cooler when we got home. Yum Yum! We had clam chowder, barbecued Tuna (Ralph bought a tuna at the docks), fried clams, boiled crab legs, and other fixin's. Yes sir, that was a feast.



Here's a picture of Zach digging for a deep clam.



Here's a picture of the Borchardt's. Luke is the one on the left closest to the camera. Ralph is wearing the "Got Fish" hat, and Zach commands the front of the boat. You can see the Newport bridge in the background. It was very crowded crabbing this day.



And here's a picture of the captain. Jennie, I ordered the decals and hat, and you wanted to put a face to my moniker, SKP, so here it is.

Well, this day was nothing less than good friends, good fishing, and good food! It doesn't get any better than this. :grin: :dance:

SKP

[ 07-26-2003, 10:32 PM: Message edited by: SKP ]
 

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Great report....good information. Thanks for sharing your day and the pictures with us.
 

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For the gapers, I like to let them sit in ice water for 24-36 hours. This way they soften up and spit the sand. Since I'm usually camping, there's no need to hurry.
 

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SKP,

Thanks for the tips. I was just talking with a friend about clamming. Hope to give it a try at an appropriate tide.

MarlinMark
 

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How much was the tuna selling for on the dock?
Great news about Luke...
 

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Glad you'all had a good catch in the bay... My fishin buddy Paul and I are going to hit the coast either today or tomorrow. Any suggestions (ie. NewPort, Depot)? I have two crab nets and plenty of fishing poles... Heard that fishing off the rocks is good for Lingcod, and the crabbing is good? Is it ok now to eat the razor clams?
 

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Bill,

Tuna was selling for around $1.75/pound, but Ralph talked him down to $1.00/pound.

SKP
 

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Another way I find easier to dig Gapers is to actually dig about 6" to the side of the clams hole and about 2' down then with your hands dig over to the clam from the side. You have much less of a risk of tearing the clam up this way.

Jon :smile: :grin: :smile:

[ 07-28-2003, 01:11 PM: Message edited by: MasterCaster ]
 

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fishingforstergeon,

Crabbing is fair in Newport, but not hot. I don't know anything about fishing for rock fish. I want to learn to fish for sea bass, and lingcod, but I've never caught any to date in Oregon, other than on a charter.

Razors are closed statewide because of domoic acid. Clamming is open only inside the bays, but only for non-razors.

I'm not sure where crabbing is hot right now. From the bank, you should try the pier on the south side of Newport Bay, or try the Coast Guard station on Tillamook Bay.

Let us know how you do.

SKP
 

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see my post "crabbing at garibaldi" for a crab report on tillamook bay
 
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