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Worst day fishing is better than the best day working.
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Don't get surge brakes. I do not like mine at all on a tandem ez loader with a 210 explorer on its back.
 

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Check with Word Boats in Spanaway. Venture aluminum trailers with Vortex components. Dependable I-beam construction. Had mine going on 6 years with exclusive saltwater usage. 2 coats of Sharkhide when new. You won't ever be sorry. My boat is 5800lbs.
 

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That is a large boat for a single axel. Some of the aspects between the two types of trailers include: Single axel, easier to tow and maneuver, only two tires and bearings to maintain but rides rougher. Double axel, rides smoother but is harder to maneuver, especially when backing, 4 tires and bearings to maintain, can carry a heaver load.
If you are in the salt water the extra expense for an aluminum trailer might be worth it. Surge brakes are good but they must be disc type and should be rust and corrosion proof. Remember brake fluid needs changing every two years on boat trailers.
 

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Aluminum I-beam is absolutely the way to go. Tandem axle, with disc brakes. Surge are my preference on a boat trailer, but you’ll want SS brake components if you expect them to last. Calipers and lines. Flush and replace fluid every couple years. It’s easy, and you’ll get good at it! A pressure bleeder is the way to go…

Heaviest tires you can fit!!! Go up at least one load range from what your loaded weight will be.
 

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I have had more trailers/boats than I should admit. Several mild steel and the best are aluminum. My North River trailers were nice looking (Al Tube not Channel or I Beam) and towed nicely when not broken . The Parker I brought out from New Jersey had an I Beam Al and was okay but that boat was a challenge to load, cause? boat? trailer? or me?
I have had surge and electric all hydraulics. For me surge are second best especially for backing up on an incline. Also I travel on icey and/or slick roads often and I prefer to be able to use my trailer brakes carefully without actuating the truck brakes. By far the most superior trailer I have ever owned is my current Guardian trailer, all aluminum, tandom discs, electric over hydraulic, oil bath bearings, white LED back up lights for night launch, bow stop for correct loading, easy to single launch and load by myself on the 26 ftr
 

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why single axle? I would definitely want a double no matter the weight.

Pros;
in a pinch (flat tire or wheel bearing failure) you can remove both wheels on that axle and continue
launching is easier when dealing with uneven ramps or drop offs
more support for the boat

Cons;
extra set of tires, brakes and hubs to deal with over time.

BTW get electric surge brakes if you can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I definitely want a dual for safety. Had a not too fun time coming back over the pass after using the boat for an elk hunt earlier in the month. I pull with a 96 f250 and an 08 f250. Haven’t noticed any issues with the setup I have other then safety concerns. Trying to decipher the different opinions about the brakes. Prices sure have gone up since the last time I looked. Is there much of a market to sell mine?

Tire Wheel Vehicle Motor vehicle Tree
 

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Boat trailers… Ugg! Don’t get me started. I’ve been throwing money down the maintenance rabbit hole for the last several years on an original painted steel trailer that fits my 1970/2020 Skipjack 20 Open Cruiser that weighs in at +/- 4K lbs. It’s solid as a rock but expensive to maintain.

The boat/trailer was a barn find so I can’t completely complain on initial cost, but at some point you’ll have to cut your losses on the old (trailer) and invest in the new (trailer). Rather than spend $7,500 to $10k on a galvanized or aluminum (brand new) trailer or look for somebody else’s problem on Craigslist that I’d end up dumping more money into the old trailer, as I recently spent (invested) another $2k on my “known known” of a boat trailer adding 2 new straight Dexter EZ lube axels, 4 new leaf springs, 4 new hubs, 2 electric brakes (back axle’s only have breaks), a new tongue jack and all the nuts ‘n bolts to fasten it together. Aside from surface rust and cosmetic corrosion it’s in pretty good shape.

I won’t get 2 years out of the electric break assemblies (saltwater destroys them way too fast), but I (hopefully) should have years of general maintenance items like (bearings, seals and tires) going forward.

It’s hard knowing when to move away from the old (trailer) and onto the new (trailer) when things are so dang expensive in this game we all love to play! 🤔💸🛥🎣🐟🦀❤
 

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I'm a big fan of electric over hydraulic actuators for boat trailers - and I believe surge brakes are not legal in Canada on trailers with a gross weight over 6160 lbs. Although I would say I have never been asked about my brakes at the border!
 

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My wife told me years ago when we kept having EZLoader trailer problems. “Get a new trailer”. Bought a Guardian. Actually a little oversized for my boat, really was designed for a 23’ and my boat is 21’. That extra capacity makes for a low maintenance trailer. Only problems I have had are all brake related. Went to Kodiak composite brake lines as the metal brake lines rust out from salt water. Just changed the UFP hubs to Vortex GalvX hubs and Kodiak slip on rotors. As to Canada brakes, never heard about the 6000# requirements, but was told you need brakes on all wheels.
 

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Since this is in the Salty Dog forum and a radar dome, I'm guessing the boat sees salt water. That means the trailer does too. Even if you only drive down 101 near salt water you want disc brakes. A properly functioning surge actuator is fine but electric over hydraulic is gold standard. Your tow vehicle needs to have a compatible brake controller.

Aluminum is preferred for a salty boat trailer. Next galvanized, last is painted steel. There's a trailer shop in the Centralia area that builds and restores trailers, a web search should find them.

The pic of your set up makes me suggest that you should get some air bags for your rig. It's dragging butt with the camper on it. The boat trailer looks like it is nose down and you can get away with that on a single axle, but tandems will overload the front axle and cause handling and wear problems. Air bags and an adjustable hitch can fix both.
 

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Canada requires the driver to be able to activate the trailer brakes (i.e. electric or electric over hydraulic) on trailers over 6173lbs. I do know a guy that was turned around at the border with surge brakes on a trailer that was over the weight limit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

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I would contact Roguejet and see what the availability of their Guardian trailer. Is all welded, not bolted together like the one you link to. The EOH upgrade seems expensive. The Hydraster 1600 psi with battery is only about a $1000 at EasternMarine and they will save $200 on the surge coupler.
 

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Tuff Trailer is another new manufacturer up that way. Yes, the one in the link comes with surge disc brakes. The addon EOH is adds the electric controller. The torsion suspension is a plus but the 'maintenance free' hubs aren't. No such thing on a boat trailer.
 
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