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I’m a newbie and I know a story is in order. So here goes. Remember though, this is my first time, so be gentle with me.
Years ago some friends and I camped beside a pretty mountain lake in the gorge. We arrived in the afternoon, set up camp, and went down to the lake to do some fishing. This was years before I got a float tube, so we took to the lake in a flotilla of rubber rafts. My companions headed for the lake armed with ultralite spinning rods and a collection of tiny spinners. I enjoy fishing with spinners too, but that afternoon I was in the mood to do a bit of fly fishing. So I grabbed my fly rod, and headed for the lake.
The water was like glass that afternoon, and the weedy northern end of the lake was dimpling with brook trout rising to sip tiny midges from the surface. The midges were so small that I would have needed a magnifying glass just to see what color they were. I didn't have any flies that size, nor were my fingers clever enough to tie flies I can’t see. So matching the hatch was out.
So I played a hunch, and tried a different tact. Instead of tying on a tiny fly, I tied a number 8 muddler on a 12 foot leader, and pinched one of those fluorescent foam strike indicators about 20 inches above the fly. Once I got out to where the fish were feeding on the midges, I cast the fly out and let it sink slowly for several seconds before giving it a twitch. The strike indicator acted like a little bobber, and when I gave the line a twitch, the muddler rose quickly to the surface. I hoped the brookies would mistake the muddler for a tiny fish rising to the surface to feast on the emerging midges.
My hunch paid off. As soon as the muddler drew near the surface, a brookie lunged at the fly so viciously that it went airborne. It missed the fly, but as soon as I twitched the fly again, another fish struck. The second fish didn't miss the fly. It was only a ten-inch fish, but it was bright and colorful, and did his best to shake the barbless hook. After I released the energetic little brookie, I cast out again with the same result. Cast after cast, I caught fish after fish. To make a long story a bit shorter, the brookies didn't stop attacking my muddler that night, until the sun went down and I returned to camp.
The point of this story isn't that I'm a good fly fisherman. I'm not. I used to enjoy tying flies, but I'll have to get my bifocals upgraded before I try that again. I'm pretty good at snapping flies off on the back cast; and tangling them in the bushes behind me, but that evening I played a hunch, tried something new, and I caught a lot of fish. For several hours, I caught a fish nearly every cast.
That trick doesn’t always work of course, but if you're ever on a mountain lake, and the trout are rising to tiny no see ums, tie a muddler on a 12 foot leader, and pinch a little strike indicator 20 inches or so above the fly, and give it a twitch. It's a trick that's worked for me more than once, and maybe it'll work for you too.
 

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Welcome, welcome. Good story. It pays to adapt.
 
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