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Discussion Starter #1
:blush: Many apologies to the fine folks moored at depot bay this morning. I came in pretty hot and recieved some mostly deserved radio critisism. This is not normal behavior for me, but the boat was filling with water, and the motor was about half under. The problem, missing plug. This is one thing that I thought would never happen to me. I am always so careful when putting the boat in and perform a 360 walk around. I always keep my plug hanging from my safety chain, so that when I remove it, it will remind me to install it. Well, my routine was disrupted, and my well meaning crew members helped me launch the boat, due to the ramp pressure I obliged them. Mistake. They released the safety chain and didn't notice the boat plug hanging from it. We made it all the way out to the last Depot bouy before I noticed the boat behaving strangely. It was as if a lightning bolt struck me down right there. THE PLUG!!. I looked at the crew desprately hoping someone miraculously remebered the plug. After looking into the faces of my guest it was apparent that no one remembered the plug (including myself). I hit the bilge pump, turned the boat around and made a bee line back to the hole. After radio call anouncing my entry was made, and an all clear was given, I made a bee-line through the hole. By now the adrenaline was pumping, and the safety of my crew and my boat was formost in my mind. :bigshock: I did come in hot, and was hoping to make the dock before the motor quit due to being drown out. After the radio started barking at some idiot creating wakes in the bay, I realized quickly that I was the idiot. I slowed it down and appologized to the offended captains.

Well, needless to say, beyond the embarassment to myself for making such a stupid mistake, I was very happy to make it back to the dock and get my boat on the trailer. When I looked into the engine compartment, I was about half way up the motor.:passout: Still shaking, I comtemplated on whether we should go back out again. The fog came in thick and that made up my mind.

Important lesson learned. If you have a routine, don't let the pressure at the dock let you vary from that routine. Take your time and get it right. The consequences for mistakes in this sport are not very forgiving.

Again, apologies to the fine folks moored at Depot.:flowered:

John
 

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Not to worry every boat owner has done it and if not will one day. I know the anguish and embarrassement. I bet you won't forget it again for awhile. Hope the rest of the day went well!
 

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We've all done something stupid like that, and we all will do stupid things in the future. It's part of being human. I would have handled it the same way you did, coming in hot for the sake of crew safety. Apologies and reparations for any property damage can come later. Glad it all turned out ok.
 

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Yes it did happen to me last year at Garibaldi and with the parking lot being full- nice folks told them what happened and we were able to cut in line- I did notice it at the dock, however. Good job on the return and you had every right to come in a little hot to get back to the dock! Well done!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the kind words. Your right, I won't make that mistake again any time soon (hopefully never). The only thing I would have done differently is to announce my difficulty before entering. Maybe that would have smoothed things over a little bit, or at least some room on the dock would be made to assist getting the boat out of the water quicker. There was a nice gentleman in a striper that did move off the dock so I could get in after I expained my troubles.
 

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It's so true, not just pressure of the docks, but eople you have with you "want" to help", and atleast for me, I have never found a comfortable way of saying " hey, I'll just get all this done myself" but it really is true. When others help, you get out of the ol "routine" and forget stuff. Glad you got back in, and highly commendable to explain/apoligize as well. :applause:
 

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I have gotten to where I do my prelaunch prep myself. I have my way to do things and don't like to deviate off the routine. I figure lees chance for forgotten things.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have gotten to where I do my prelaunch prep myself. I have my way to do things and don't like to deviate off the routine. I figure lees chance for forgotten things.
That is exactly the right thing to do. I know this sounds bad, but trust no one when it comes to the safety of your boat. Do the 360 prelaunch prep yourself, and don't get hurried regardless of the ramp pressure. I hope others can learn from this mistake. I know I won't soon forget it.
 

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Well meaning crew .. they want to help. Especially when they see how hard you are working as the guy in charge.

There are things I let my crew do and there are things that no matter how tired or hurried I am that I always do. Pre launch check is one of those things. But I encourage my guys to ask about the plug. On my boat rushing back on to the trailer is not very easy. SO I cannot afford to ever forget the plug.

Glad you made it back. Several times now we have lost boats at the ranch due to this problem. They run out on plane and begin sinking when they stop to fish. This has happened to at least 10 people since I started fishing central coast.

About the ramp. Yeah there is pressure. But no one is more important than anyone else. If someone thinks they are so important that they don't have to wait then I won't let them swerve me from my routine.

I have even said to some extremely self important individuals ///

"Man ... I had no idea you were so important .. you better go first so you won't miss out on anything."

I did this one day on return and trailering and the guy left his bow line drag and then ran it over as he drove up the ramp. There was a loud cracking sound and it broke some fiberglass on the bow of his boat. I couldn't help myself ...

"sure glad I let you go first .. just so you could break your boat and I could laugh at your dumb <unprintable>."

The guy hopped in his truck and left without saying a word.
 

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Done that twice that I can remember! The new boat has enough pumping power to overcome that but I haven't forgot the plug on this boat. Knock on wood!
 

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Done that myself but instead of returning to port I was able to locate the spare plug quickly and dove in the water to plug it up.

I now know exactly where the spares are on my boat:blush:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If I were further out and knew I wouldn't make it back in time, I would also jump in to try to save the boat. I figure that one person wet and cold is better than the whole crew wet and cold with no boat in sight. I keep an extra plug in the boat as well. I would suggest that everyone do the same, it could be the difference between making it home with your boat, or the unthinkable.:eek:
 

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There are those who have fogot the plug and those who will. You just switched groups. Welcome to the group that has.
 

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Yes, been there done that like I'm sure Millions of other have at least twice. I always thank people for asking me if the plug is in and if I see the crab trap floats. My friends on my boat KNOW I'm not infallable.
Glad you and boat are safe.
 

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glad to hear you & crew made it back in safely, most folk's understand that a little bouncing around in the marina vs sinking boat is forgivableand alittle patence at the ramp gos along way
 
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