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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's gut-wrenching! The B&B complex fire is just devouring the terrain at santiam and along the metolius. It's only a few miles from wizard falls hatchery I hear. Grew 20,000 acres yesterday alone! Anyone who's been to camp sherman knows it's one of the most magical spots in C. oregon. To loose the whole area to fire is just a tragedy. I've prayed for some real rain (what's that?) as I don't see it going out until
precip comes. Thoughts go out to those who have once again been forced to evacuate Camp sherman and those fighting the blaze.
GBS
 

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Yeah, it's pretty crazy out there right now! It's sad to see such gorgeous land and territory go up in flames! Not to mention people's homes and all their belongings! My thoughts and prayers go out to the families who are affected by these wildfires.

-jokester
 

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I dont worry too much about it. Fire is a natural part of life. The land comes back fast from a fire. As for buildings they can always be rebuilt
 

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Don't know what effect it might have had on the fire out there, but there has been some massive black thunderclouds hanging over that area all afternoon. From work here in Redmond I've seen some lightning and heard some thunder. It also looks like it's raining like crazy somewhere - let's just hope it right on the fire. I imagine though there have been some strong winds along with the storm. :depressed:
 

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Gee, Jookey, nice philosophy. Maybe I could drive you up there and drop you off so you can explain it to folks who are having to abandon so much of the things they love.

We all lose in this deal, and I, too, am very sad.

Skein
 

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My concern is the impacts of the fire retardant they're dropping, should they hit the Metolius or tribs by accident. Especially as we're getting into the Bull Trout spawning season.

I looked over the Nugget site (www.nuggetnews.com)
but did not see any comments about this.

I hope to learn that the USFS is taking steps to avoid this mistake (remember the Fall River fish kill?).

BTW, I think this thread's title is a bit over-sensational. Reminds me of 1988 when the headlines said 'Yellowstone Destroyed' - hardly. In fact, while these fires have short term impacts they tend to do more longterm good. Not minimizing the stress it puts on the community and its people, just pointing out the biological reality.
 

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Jooky, Garyk... though I know where your coming from and agree to an extent: massive fires such as these effect more than just the timber and homes in thier paths. The environmental effect is overwhelming to some extent, including the waterways where trees provided shade... and habitat for insects and plant life. Erosion is soon to follow when the rains finally do come, and this will have a substancial effect on wildlife and fish habitat for miles and miles downstream. Though its difficult to imagine a fire can effect aquatic life more immediately, believe it or not a hot timber fire sucks the oxygen out of the water, often to a degree that kills insects, larvea, and even fish. The chemicals produced by fire can turn a clear running stream into an acidic cesspool in short time. Add to this the effects of the direct sunlight upon the water and soil?

On the other hand its seems trivial to be so concerned with wildlife and fish when human lives and livlyhood is/are effected, fire may have possitives in a number of ways, the negatives are far more abundant and very difficult and timely for the land, the wildlife and people to recover from.

[ 09-05-2003, 03:50 PM: Message edited by: Row Vs. Wade ]
 

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I really feel for the folks that live in the area. I camp and fish there several times every year and have friends who own vacation homes in Camp Sherman. But I do have to say that while most of the area near the river has been pretty well maintained there are large parts of the forest that were prime for a fire, and to be honest it needed to happen. The last time I hiked up to Jefferson Lake the trail was an obstical course with fallen trees and dead brush every where. While I hope that the brave folks fighting the fires are able to save all of the homes and the hatchery I really feel that the fire is a good thing for the long term health of the surrounding wilderness. The forest will come back better than ever.
 

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Black Butte Ranch has some good newspaper and fire links that I have been watching.
I am so worried for the residents of that beautiful area.
Yes, it's a natural event, but I sure would be sad to see my forest all black and ugly. :depressed:

...and my home... and... and...

I think it's tragic, natural or not. :depressed:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
yes, fire is a natural event and a cleansing process for a healthy forest, true. An yes, some forest are ripe for such an event, it's mother nature doing her part. Still, areas like the metolius, with it's massive ponderosa pines, will take a very long time to recover. Even burned, maybe some will survive. It would be great for my son to experience the granduer of the area I've known. Maybe his son can. I too am concerned about the
possible effects the retardant would have on that
amazing piece of water. Guess time will tell, we'll just have to sit tight and wait to see how it ends up.
 

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Row v. Wade - From my time living there, I am much more optimistic overall and skeptical about the 'worst case scenarios'. The big trees will largely survive - as they have fires in the past.

Reports have it that a lot of the hot burning areas are in the clearcuts from the 1970's and 1980's - these turned into brush fields and went up like oil-soaked rags.

As far as aesthetics and ugliness - nothing matches the 'ugly' of those clearcuts. This is Nature doing some overdue cleanup duty, in my opinion.

Again, I'm not downplaying what a stressful time this is for my friends and once-neighbors in the Camp Sherman community. Being evacuated, especially for as long as they have is a nerve-wracking experience (I understand, I've personally been in that situation).

I'm planning on being there during the fourth week of this month. IF there's interest I'll post some pics
 

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Uh... Gary, I was through there when they first opened Hwy 20 back up at the end of Labor Day. Looked like Mother Nature forgot to leave a buffer zone around the streams and road.

Kinda reminds me of the story about the young preacher and the old farmer. The young preacher looked the farmer's field over and said, "That's a fine farm you and the Lord have." "Yep," replied the farmer, "but you should have seen it when the Lord had it by himself."

I don't think forest fires leave anything looking prettier. But that's just my perspective.

Skein
 

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Uh...Skein, the grounds still hot, have a little patience. :smile:

Wait till next spring and the one after when the greenup and new growth starts. The wildflowers will be stunning. This fire will revigorate the browse and forbs for the deer and elk, plus the food sources for others. Huckleberries too.

The regeneration of Yellowstone National Park after the fires of 1988 is a sight to see and well worth the visit.
 

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there has been extensive beattle kill in this entire region for the last 20 odd years with nothing done to remove dead, and dying timber.you get what you pay for. with the little or no funding for the forest service,enjoy raging wildfires for the next 20 years. :cheers:
 
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