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But would you shoot A lynx in oregon if it had a green collar???:jester: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
 

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The thing everyone forgets is that there is variation within any population of mammals in size and coloration. A big bobcat is well within the size range of an average lynx, just as a small lynx would be well within the parameters of your normal bobcat. Look in any field guide and you will see that bobcats become more grayish during the colder months, do have bobbed tails and ear tufts as well. Unless you have seen both Lynx and Bobcats both in the wild on multiple occasions its not likely that your average guy could make an accurate identification. Its like someone saying theres grizzlies in Oregon because they saw a big bear that was brown instead of black.

Dont get me wrong, maybe they are here. Lets get the trail cams out there and prove it! Id love to see apicture of one.
 

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With as many folks on IFISH, If only Half gets Just one trail cam. The amount of photo's.. WOW. Just think of the amount of critters caught on Film.

We might get lucky, for a lynx, Wolf, Aliens feeding BigFoot More stealth food. :)

Camera's are cheaper, about every person has one going outdoors. Just a matter of time, for a "good" photo. If they share????:laugh:
 

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you will notice a few thing in the above pictures, that show how to tell the difference between a canada lynx and a bobcat. the bigest quick identifier is the black/dark tip on the tail. then the dark ear tufts and huge feet
 

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Years ago, in one valley off of 26W I was getting cats that were different looking. Those cats were very pale and more gray but I would not have called them a lynx.

But the fur buyer called em Lynx. He paid top dollar for em (lynx price) before I could stop him! I liked the money so I just snickered and took it.

We took a lot of cats back then, but that one valley was the only place with the pales.

I always heard stories about the eastern Oregon cats being Lynx, but I thought they were just long legged bobs.

Mast
 

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Here's the story... Kind of long

Scientists' 'wild hair' really wasn't
Fur from tame lynx was inserted in samples to test laboratory's ability
Tuesday, December 18, 2001
By LISA STIFFLER
SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER

Snowmobilers and timber groups are wondering if government biologists have cried "lynx."
State and federal biologists recently admitted to planting fur samples in a survey to determine the distribution of Canadian lynx in national forests. Three samples taken from captive cats were added to samples reportedly found in the Wenatchee and Gifford Pinchot national forests.
But the biologists, who notified interested parties of what they did, said the samples were added to make sure the lab analyzing the fur was able to successfully detect lynx with its DNA analysis.
"It's a way of testing if a lab knows what it's doing," Doug Zimmer, spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Lacey, said yesterday. "It was not an attempt to put lynx where they're not."
Lynx were found in the Okanogan National Forest in the survey, but not the two forests to which the samples were added. The false samples were removed from the study and did not taint its outcome. Samples were collected again this year.
If lynx -- which have protection as a federally threatened species -- had been found in Wenatchee and Gifford Pinchot national forests some activities, including snowmobiling and tree cutting, could be curtailed.
The elusive cat, with its broad, furry paws, is well-adapted to hunting snowshoe hares through snowy drifts. The snowmobiles pack the drifts and give unfair advantage to other predators competing with lynx for prey. Thickets of lodgepole pine need to be maintained as habitat for the hares.
Even if the lynx were shown to reside elsewhere in Washington, changes in land use would come slowly and would not necessarily be severe.
"Nothing would change overnight," said Rex Holloway, spokesman with the U.S. Forest Service.
Chris West, vice president of the timber group the American Forest Resource Council, said he wasn't sure the government biologists were trying to falsify results, but was concerned about the study.
"There's already been some funny business going on with the lynx," he said.
A few years ago, an Oregon lynx study performed by a contractor hired by the Forest Service was called into question, West said. The contractor claimed to find lynx, but the results could not be validated and the contractor was not paid.
The seven biologists who were part of the government study included employees of the Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service and state Department of Fish and Wildlife. An investigation was conducted into the adding of the samples as soon as it was discovered, and the scientists involved were taken off the project, agency spokesmen said.
"This is a very, very isolated incident," Zimmer said.
The samples falsely added to the survey came from two lynx, one belonging to a federal scientist doing research and the other from a wild-animal park, he said. "If you were really going to skew something, you would use samples that you picked off the wild."
In experiments, "control" samples can be added to test techniques, but their addition was not included in the protocol for this particular survey.
The incident could undermine the integrity of the research.
"It jeopardizes the whole process of trying to protect the lynx in the first place," said Glenn Warren, president of the Washington State Snowmobile Association, a group of about 2,300 registered members and their families.
"We always like to see good science prevailing."

P-I reporter Lisa Stiffler can be reached at 206-448-8042 or [email protected]
Surprise! :frown:
The PI's story does not appear to match the GAO's investigation of this incident (http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d02496t.pdf) and other available information.
This subterfuge could have resulted in the closure of thousands of acres of public forest land to hunting and other activities.
Even the tree huggers at NPR (http://www.npr.org/programs/atc/features/2002/feb/lynx/020220.lynx.html)
did not attempt this kind of blatant slanting of this incident.
 

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I have trapped both bobcat and lynx. I saw one in Ukia and I know what it was. along with four of my buddys. it crossed the road right in front of us. No body else believes us but dang it Ive trapped them In Washington state back in the early 90s Of corse I released them every time. I know what the look like.
 

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None. Why would I? I've done nothing wrong. If I caught a lynx in a trap I'd call a bio so they could come out and look at it. My guess is they'd want to put a collar on it so they could follow it around.
I did just that and they did, I also got a couger in a trap and they put a collar on that one as well
 

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Put me down for the: I think I have seen one but don't have a photo group. I was hunting elk North Desolation/S. Ukiah area and as I was driving to a new location along side a creek when a small cat ran out in front of me. It was only about 50 yards in front of the truck and it stoped right in the middle of the road. Small probably 15-20lbs, Frost Gray in color with vertical strips that were very faint, huge paws for a little cat. Short tail. It may have been a juvi bobcat but every photo that I've seen leads me to believe it was a lynx. That's my story and I'm sticking to it
 

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Well they are here and here to stay ,I have seen one by my house ,the Lynx is way bigger than a Bob cat got them in my yard :D:D:D
 

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One outdoor book I have cites Oregon's upper Grande Ronde drainage as having lynx.
 

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I ran across one last Saturday morning about 145 am headed to murderers creek for deer hunting. It was much larger than a bobcat. It made about three strides across the road before dropping off into the brush
 

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I watched a lynx north of hat point in 1978! It was larger than any bobcat I ever trapped and had lynx markings. I fact it was every bit as large as the two my granddaughter trapped last year in Alaska! But I haven't seen one since in the lower 48!
 

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I have seen a lynx in the wild in Alaska. I have seen a bobcat in the wild here in Oregon. I have to say the lynx was considerably larger. It was many years ago, but I remember thinking "Wow. Thats a big cat." When ibsaw the bobcat, i thought "Ah. Thats cute. I'd like to pet it." Of course it could be my mind playing tricks, or distance of viewing, juvenile vs adult, etc.
 

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I ran across one last Saturday morning about 145 am headed to murderers creek for deer hunting. It was much larger than a bobcat. It made about three strides across the road before dropping off into the brush
I believe it. I saw a Wolverine outside of Estacada about 5 years ago, so anything is possible.
 
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