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I'm going to dust off the old RCBS reloader and put up some rounds for a CZ 527 Varmint Kevlar (1:9 Twist, .223).

I get about .75" groups out of Hornady factory 55 gr V-max. I'd like to try to shave a 1/4" off of this, and save a little money.

I plan to buy a lot of new Remington brass from Midway, and keep all the brass consistant. I will probably use a 55gr V-max, 60g V-max or a 55g Nosler B-tip.

I want "accuracy value." By this I mean that I don't want to spend excessive amounts of time reloading to get minute increases in accuracy, but want to focus on solid, consistent technique that produces good results. With that said, I have the following questions:

Should I buy pre-primed brass?
Will boring/cleaning the flash hole have a substantial effect on accuracy?
Other than powder charge and bullet seating what steps are the most important for accuracy?
Any opinions on the bullets?
Suggest any loads?

Thank you!
 

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I like and use Winchester brass myself. In order to gain consistancy, everything must be the same. Brass must weigh the same, all trimmed to the same length, flashholes deburred and primer pockets all cut the same. I would buy benchrest grade primers; I use the Federal Gold Match. I will usually hand throw and trickle my powder on every round I load for sighting and hunting so I know it will be the same. I will also weigh bullets. You can go as extreme as you want to but it must all be the same.
 

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For what it's worth, I've gotten a little better accuracy in my 22-250 using V-max compared to Nosler BT (Not much better..but my rifle seems to like the V-max a little better...these have been 50 grain bullets. The 55 grain Nosler did pretty well
 

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I'm of the opinion that IF you have an ACCURATE rifle then, of course the little things make some difference.

If the rifle's not truly "accurate", then the little things can make (a little) difference to help improve group size, but not much.

I also find that even by not being too attentive to shooting the "best, most accurate" loads, my (.223 Rem) rifle still shoots "well" (0.50"-0.60").

With some rifles you can wear out a barrel trying to get "things" shooting well, and they never really do. Those rifles really aren't worth the extra time/trouble to chase after better accuracy with. You just shoot 'em and live with 'em, or else get them rebarelled/worked on, or just switch to another rifle.

:twocents:

:cheers:
 

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The gun is the most important thing, if the nut behind the trigger does his job. What distance will you be shooting from? Things start to manifest at 200yds and really show up out at 300yds not so much at 100yds. If you are shooting for groups under 200yds save yourself the time and don't over do it, anything under MOA is good.


Uniform the primer pocket and flash holes, once fired Winchester brass, weigh each charge of Varget or RL-15 for powder, Federal primers (match if you can find them), good competition dies to seat the bullets.
1 1/4" at 300yds if I don't have too much coffee.....
 

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I prefer Winchester brass, but I don't have a real good reason for it. I have shot plenty of great groups with Remington and Federal brass. For case prep, I deburr the flashholes, but I don't always do the primer pockets on my .223 brass. Of course inside and outside chamfering of the case mouth is important. I use a VLD chamfering tool on the inside of the case mouth.

My favorite small rifle primer is the Remington 7-1/2, but I am having a hard time finding them lately. I have been using Federal Match primers instead, and they seem fine.

As for your questions:
Should I buy pre-primed brass? I never do. It seems there's always a few cases with dinged case mouths, so I like to resize new brass anyway. And, unprimed brass makes it easy to do the flashholes and primer pockets if you choose to do so.


Will boring/cleaning the flash hole have a substantial effect on accuracy? I think so, but I don't have any hard data that supports my opinion. It's easy enough to do, so I just do it as a matter of habit. The primer pockets, on the other hand, are more of a pain for me. I do them by hand, so I don't usually bother with .223 rounds. I have too many of them.


Other than powder charge and bullet seating what steps are the most important for accuracy? Other than careful case prep, measuring powder, and bullet seating, just try to be consistent in everything you do....priming, handling, etc.


Any opinions on the bullets? I've had good luck with V-Max, Nosler Balistic Tips and Speer TNT's.


Suggest any loads? My heavy barrel loved 26.5gr W748 with a 50gr V-Max. I sold that gun because I didn't like carrying it around, but I miss it. Shooting sub 1/2" groups was just plain easy with this rifle. My LVSF seems to show promise with 25gr of Benchmark and 55gr NBT's.
 

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To start you might consider Lapua brass.They will have consistant primer holes.
I also like Benchmark and Remington primers.
I also like to use the Hornady New Dimension Dies because of the tight seater grasp while seating the bullet.
You can also buy Lapua .223 AMMO 20 for near $23 with 55FMJ.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the insight.


Best Regards,


Ol' KL
 

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To get much better than .75" groups you will have to really work on round to round consistency.

When I was shooting competitively, there were very good shooters who had their brass bulk resized and primed by River Valley Ordnance Works. It's roll sizing and the brass would come back with primers crimped in place. Those guys did not want to spend their limited free time reloading- they spent it at the range- and were very good 600 yard shooters.

There was the other school of thought that weighed everything, trimmed everything, and tried to really get the last out of the ammo with the thought that a rifle can only lose points, not gain points. Very good shooters in that crowd, too.

Personally the only stuff I was anal about was 600 yard 80 grain .223 loads. They got the full treatment- trimmed to length, flash holes uniformed, sorted by weight, etc.

I fired most rounds at 200/300 yards and 3/4moa was plenty good enough. With 75 Horndady BTHP's and Reloder 15 I'd use Winchester brass (Remington is soft and my loads were far too hot for it), only trim if they were long, and never any case prep other than size and dump the powder. If the match mattered I'd weigh every charge but if it was a local match or practice I metered it and weighed every tenth one- and could never tell the difference on paper. The mental aspect of prepping the ammo helped me at Camp Perry, though- so I did it for that reason alone.

Primers? Remington BR's are outstanding. Russian primers are probably the most consistent on the market and a good value. I also have had excellent accuracy with CCI small rifle magnum primers. Winchester primers are soft- if you shoot hot loads with them you will end up replacing a firing pin and maybe a bolt face.

I love Lapua brass but only used it on 600 yard loads with VV N540 and JLK VLD 80 grain bullets. The loads were hot enough that the brass could not be reused due to primer pocket enlargement. If you are shooting loads that are mild enough to allow several reloadings it's not a bad choice. Winchester brass, Remington BR primers, and Reloder 15 behind Hornady 75's is a wonderfully accurate combo.

You'll shoot well if you are confident in your ammo, and you'll shoot well if you practice- so pick where you want to spend your time.

regards, aw
 

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When I was shooting competitively, there were very good shooters who had their brass bulk resized and primed by River Valley Ordnance Works.

I sure miss RVOW. :frown:
 

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I'll echo Dan & AW. Same lot brass, partial size cases based on chamber demensions, de-burr flash hole using a Sinclair style tool (Not the RCBS tool), uniform primer pockets (again Sinclair tool), trim to length, and sort by weight. Toss out any odd balls.

Don't expect perfect performance until after the 1st firing.
Forget the 3 bullet evaluation and focus on just the 55gr V-Max (IMO anyways).
Seat .010" off lands (or as long as the magazine will allow and still be =>.010")
Pick good ball powder that gives >90% load density with a max charge.
Vary powder charge from min to max loading in .5gr increments.
Shoot each powder charge on targets (All on one day) and record vital load data and evaluate brass for pressure signs as you shoot. Record all observations on your targets. Try to call all your shots and mark known fliers.

Stop when you see signs of pressure: primers flatten, cratering, sticky extraction, jams, etc. Any of tthese signs and you are way over max chamber pressure.

Don't be surprised if you settle on something around 25gr H335 w/ the 55gr V-Max. This is a known load to many and very good place to start your efforts.

That rifle CZ you are talking about is known to do better than 3/4MOA, 1/2-1/4MOA is possible.

PM "John in Oregon" I believe he has one of these rifle and could share some of his pet loads with you but no guarentte your rifle will prefer them as his does.
Hope this helps,
Hunt'nFish

PS: email me for a copy of my handloading procedures. These are the same procedures I presented this spring during the Handloading Seminar.
I don't claim to know it all but I have learned a thing or two over the years.
 
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