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Discussion Starter #1
(After posting this elsewhere, I thought maybe a new thread would bring in some funny stories from other ifishers? Hope it's ok to post again.)


Being new to this sport I am definitely still learning, and being a dad with three active boys who also have piano, soccer, etc...my fishing time is very limited. Essentially I don't go unless my boys are with me. If people want to give reports on how many they caught that is fine...But...

The funnest fishing day I had this year (my first year actually) i think is when my fishing smart friend Danny was going to show us how to land a big nook by yourself, largely against my suggestions. You know...he has this super hog on line with one hand, in the Tilly channel, terrible weather, windy as heck, choppy, etc... So he grabs the net with the right hand, holding the rod with the left...and I am laughing and yelling for him to hand me the net so I can get it in for him. He is clearly struggling both with the hog and his ego, since now he is psychologically committed to showing off his great skills..you get the picture...letting his testosterone get the best of him? Anyway he almost falls in trying to do it all in the rough, and won't hand off the net in spite of my repeatedly calling for it...and as hard as he tries over and over again he cannot get this thing in alone. Is he going to give me the net?...NOOOOOOOO...he has to do it himself! So here are two grown men laughing about his floundering, and I am threatening to throw him in the drink if it comes off...but he STILL won't hand off the net. You guessed it...with me chasing him around the boat, and him turning his back so I can't get the net out of his hands, (and me also trying to keep the boat under control or believe me I would have had the net in a second) ... the porker finally shakes off close to the boat. I gave him all kinds of razzing about his showing me how to do it...you know..."Tell me again Danny, how do I do that one handed next time..."

We laughed so hard we didn't much care if we brought any fish in the whole day...in fact we decided, as I usually do, that neither he nor i would bring in a chinook all day until my 13 year old brought in his without any assistance from us, except the net of course. My boy lost two nice ones, but even he was laughing so hard it was hard for him to concentrate on the job at hand, since we were egging him on about being a good sportsman today. We bragged all day to each other for weeks about being such good sportsmen, you know, catch and release, repeatedly in one day...leaving out the middle man (Mr. Net) for increased efficiency.

That day was every bit as much fun as the day we caught a large shark followed by twenty cohos earlier in the season...and we talk about that day much more still...esp when the weather is bad and the fishing is not productive, we brag to each other about what good sportsmen we are going to be today....and the laughing starts anew from all of us.

This will be my season's best single memory day. The only way it could have been better, under the circumstances, would have been if I had thrown Danny in the drink....But since it was cold and choppy it would have been too hard to get him back in the boat and warmed up again. But if he ever does that again on a warm, calm day...he is gone!!

(Perhaps you had to be there to really get the felling.)

M.
 

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Originally posted by kayakfisher:
But if he ever does that again on a warm, calm day...he is gone!!M.
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">Now that's funny! :grin:
 

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Heres one I thought was funny...

I was at the Blue Creek hole fishing for steelhead one winter. The water was pretty high, and I was standing in it up to about my belly button having a great time. There wasn't a whole lot of bank, and where I was standing people had to get in the water to go around me. One fellow came up, and asked me if the water was very deep. I told him that I was 6'8" tall, and he looked at me like I was lying (Fishermen never lie :). He promptly got in the river and was standing in water up to his armpits. "I guess you are pretty tall" he said! And mosey'ed downriver like nothing happened.

Then there was the time I and two friends were doing the "Round the town" drift on the Siletz. We were suprised to see no other boats in the parking lot when we got there, and didn't see one single boat while we were out. When we got to the takeout, I went to get the towrig. As I pulled into the boat launch, a sheriff pulled in behind me and asked if we did any good. I told him the details, and he sat there at the boat launch. When I met up with my friends, I told them I found out why we saw no other boats that day. "That sheriff up there told me the river is closed and that we are all getting tickets!". I thought their eyes were going to pop out of their sockets!
 

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I don't know how funny this story is, but it sure was funny to the guy's at work.

About 5 years ago, a friend of mine and I-fish lurker introduced me to sturgeon fishing. After going up to the fishery several times with him and catching lots of keepers, I decided it was time to get my own gear.

I purchased a 6 ft Shakespeare Tidewater rod combined with a used Penn 113h 4/0 spooled with 80lb tuff line. Anyone who knows what a Shakespeare Tidewater rod is knows it is not a very good rod for Sturgeon, because it has no tip and has a very short butt. The Penn 4/0 was a used reel that had been sitting in my friend’s garage for about 15 years and needed a good cleaning and greasing. When I bought the reel my friend John made sure to tell me I needed to clean and grease the reel. Being the Gung-Ho individual I am, I did not clean or grease the reel (A lesson I will never forget).

It was a warm June day, and my friend John and I decided to go catch a few shad, then do a little oversize fishing (Something I had never done). After running my old aluminum boat up to Camas for Shad, we were ready for Sturgeon. We set anchor in about 70 ft of water under the power lines and prepared to do battle. John had told me not to expect too much action, as this was not the prime fishing area that was available in the Gorge.

After about 20 minutes of sitting in the boat with our lines out, I noticed I was getting a bite. As I went to grab the rod, John told me to make sure and set the hook. Once I felt the fish had taken the bait, I ripped back with all I had and it felt like I hit a brick wall. This was one humongous fish.

The adrenaline was pumping through me like the water going over Multnomah Falls. As the fish was tearing line off the spool a bearing started to seize on my reel. By this time John had released the anchor line from the boat and we were in tow. I was still able to crank up on the reel, but every crank was like cranking a large boat on a trailer with a small winch. Since the bearings had begun to seize on the ends of the spool, the drag pressure was increased ten fold. This made it very difficult to fight a fish of this size, because the drags were not doing the work for me.

The increased drag pressure also made it more work for the Sturgeon, as it tail walked across the top of the water. When I saw this enormous prehistoric creature rise from the water I was in shock. This was not your typical 7-8 ft oversized Sturgeon, this fish was pushing 12-13 ft.

As I fought the beast from the deep, all John could do was smile and laugh. I could see I was not going to get any help fighting this monster. Finally I thought I had gained on the fish as I had him under the boat, boy was I wrong. This monster was just getting started. The fish was now pulling line off the reel as well as the boat up river. Again the monster from the deep surfaced like a sub, only to dive once more into the deep.
At this point I was exhausted, it was all I could do to hold on to the rod. This fish was making me give everything I had and then some. If only I had listened to my friend John and cleaned up the reel. After finally buckling to my knees holding the rod over the gunnels, the Sturgeon won, it straightened out a 10/0 VMC hook.

A sigh of relief went through me, because even though I had lost the battle it was over. I learned many valuable lessons that day, one being to make sure my gear is always in proper working order
 

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Discussion Starter #6
:cheers:

Good one...If Danny had been there he would have been telling me how to net the thing with one hand of course...

:smile:
 

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ok, here's one.
this was in feb. in upstate NY about 15 years ago.
We were fishing for trout and atlantic salmon in my 18 boat trolling a very big deep lake that does not freeze over in winter. Air temp was about
15-20 degrees. Well, it was back in my "party" days so along with the trout we caught, we all enjoyed a little mary jane, and each had also consumed a screwdriver. Not my idea, I swear.
So we finish up and head to the dock. Tie up, and I jump off the boat and say, "hey gary, hand me the car keys". I reach out to him as he reaches out and as if in slow motion he lets go and I don't have them firmly in my hands either.
Like a slow motion scene from a movie I see them drop from our hands and dissapear into the 3" gap between boat and dock. KERPLUNK!
We look at each other and do the dull response.
WHOA DUDE, THAT REALLY BITES!

I take the net and scoop along the bottom but it's too deep. The fish finder says about 6 feet.
So being the courageous rocket scientist I am, I strip down to my undies and lower myself into the frigid water as my buddies hold onto me. I had to
go clear up to my ears to feel the bottom. Much to my horror it was about a foot of mud so after about to minutes of searching with my toes, and I was nearly unconcious, I asked to be pulled out. Not the brightest thing I've done. I was one frozen pup! fortunately we had extra clothes and
a heater on the boat. After about 1/2 hour I could feel something a walked to a phone to call a locksmith. It was a holiday, so the guy really wacked me on the price. Got it done though and headed home.
I can still feel the cold of the water that day, and will never do anything so stupid again. Well, hopefully not.
GBS
 

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Keys in the water part II

I had a similar exeprience when we launched at Maryhill State Park one year. We fished all day long, stayed too late, and got back to the dock just as it was getting dark. My sister hops out of the boat and says to my Mother, "Hey toss me the keys and I'll bring the car down". Before I could say Don't!, She did, and Julie, (Sister) missed them and down they went, in that same 3" slot between the boat and the dock.

Tried the net but the bottom was too rocky. So, I tore apart one of the speakers in the boat and used the magnet on a fishing rod to "Catch" the keys. Now eveyone keeps their hands off the keys until they are on Terra Firma.

I didn't post this before, because it wasn't funny, but It does get more humorous as more time flies. Now we call her "Julie the Jinx!" Or JJ for short.....

Oh yeah!, Now I keep one of those Harbor Freight retrieving magnets on the boat... :smile:

[ 01-05-2004, 12:00 PM: Message edited by: Leroy ]
 

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My best friends first steelhead.
We were fishing the bench at the mouth of the white Salmon. Sholder to sholder .
We were about 18 years old and everyone on the bench knew we were from Idaho.
Not just because of the improper fishing gear we had , but because We looked kind of greenish colored to the locals.
We play hard, and getting to the bench early seemed important for position on the bench ,and the likely hood of catching fish.
So we drew straws to see who would sleep on the bench, or next to it , so as to secure a good spot on the bench.
The friend who drew the short stick and was to get the prime seats in the morning , slept in . He finally woke up when the crowd showed up. We ended up on the bad end of the bench, and none of us could make a cast out to the hole, we were about 1/2 a cast short.Wrong pole, wrong line and wrong reel.
Finally, after two days of sitting and casting our guts out in 100 degree heat, my friend hooks his fish.
He yells "Fish on" at the top of his lungs and then proceeds to call it a monster.
All the old boys reeled in and start to stand and watch as my friend put on a clinic fighting this beast of a fish. I distinctly remember asking if he thought it felt big . He exclaimed yes "its a hog"!!!
Buy now he has a pretty good crowd watching (all the guys from the bench plus some watching from the bridge above).
My friend was shaking and breathing heavy and as he brought the fish up for everyones first glimps of the monster, you could hear the wind get sucked out of the crowd,,, it was a 7 1/2lb. fish. Not even average! We never did gain any rank on the bench that summer. In fact I think we were probably demoted back to Id. rednecks with fish poles after that .
Later I herd a couple old timers talking about the dumb guys who were sleeping in the rocks..I didnt admit to being part of it.
We live and learn. Hi Ho. id. painter
 

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Halibut Fishing in Homer, Alaska with Onis King (a friend of the family's). Parked several miles off the coast; sitting and sitting, and sitting some more. Many hours passes with not so much as a nibble.

Things were't looking to good as far as catching a Halibut went. At this point Onis (the captain) says we've tried everything except for one last thing..., my final resort bottle of "Wild Turkey". He breaks out the bottle of 101 proof "liquid good luck", takes a swig and hands me the bottle. I set the pole down to grab the bottle and about the time I'm taking my swig, WHAM!! there goes the rod and reel - overboard plunging into the depths of the pacific at a rapid rate trailing only God knows how big of a Halibut.. That darn "Wild Turkey" works good. Too good!

Anyway, to save the day, he gives me a spare and we catch our limit in about twenty minutes (4 of us on the boat).

SN
 

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Well about three years ago I decided to tale a freind sturgeon fishing up to horsetail. So on the way there my alternator takes a dump and my headlights are getting dim so finaly the truck dies on me on the 205. :mad: So then I have to go and remove the battery from the boat to use that on the truck, so then we are off again.
At the ramp I have to put the boat in, pull up to park, take the battery out and walk down the the boat with the heavey battery. :hoboy: So off we go to get my buddy his first sturgeon :smile: We got ancored and start fishing yeah. I am using about ten ounces of lead and pitching it back, we are cathing a few shakers all is well. Then my buddy Jim says can I toss that out there. I tell him that this is my wifes new pole and reel and that if he does not do it right then it will back lash and yank it out of his hand. Well he say no problem which reminds me of Ray Stevens saying no problem. So he takes aim and lets loose of the line with his thumb and then there goes the pole tip first into the water bye bye. :blush: I then look at him and remind him how ****ed off my wife is going to be with him throwing her pole over the side of the boat like that:eek: . So he is going through the list of items and the prices that its going to cost him which came up to about $200 so then I rigged up another pole with a large treble and reef it out there. I started slowly draging it back and I felt like I might have something and maybe even the line. When slowly the tip of the pole comes out of the water I had actually hooked the pole through the third eye. I thought Jim was going to wet his pants he was so happy. Then he handed me the pole and asked me to cast it out for him for the rest of the day. We did pretty good and ender up with about 50 shakers and limits a 47" and a 53" What a great day fishing. The only thing that would have made it better was if there would have been a keeper on the end of the line of the pole that he through over. The next time we went out I brought a dog leash and hooked the two of them together. :laugh: :dance:
 

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My fishing buddy just told me this one the other day while traveling. He used to fish the Siuslaw system a lot with waders but was tearing them up on bushes and barbed wire and so was getting wet quite a bit not to mention going through a lot of waters. (he's very short legged) Anyway he decides to wear some loose fitting jeans over them for protection.
So while fishing this one day when it was particularly cold a drift boat comes by and after they passed he heard em say ...Man, that is one tuff dude!
<)))><
 

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Fishing in 7 degree weather on 4 jan 2004

I new I would have the river to myself, very cold weather and the Seahawks were in the playoffs. If you don’t have time to read a long post just scan the BOLD word it sum’s the day up nicely

1. Knowing it was going to be cold, I placed my wet waders in the house the night before to dry and then put them in the front of the truck. What I didn’t dry/put in the front of the truck was the wader shoes and they were FROZEN solid when I got to the river. So I had to unthaw them in the truck.
2. Felt bottom boots suck in the snow, first few steps away from the truck slipped and fell but it wasn’t bad lots of cloths and 5 inches of snow. Did get COLD wet hands to start the day with.
3. Sprayed the guides of my rod and line with reel magic, works for the guides but braided line still freezes as soon as the wet line leaves the water re-dipping the line does not remove the ICE
4. While stepping out of the river found out that felt bottom boots suck on ICE slipped right where the ice met the shore, landed on softball size rocks and ICE ouch.
5. No matter how nice and pliable the plastic jig box is, when COLD it well shatter when a 230 pound man falls on it . So now I have a fishing vest with a pocket full of jigs and shattered plastic.
6. I returned to the truck and decided to run down to the corner gas station and get some coffee and re organized the jigs in what’s left of the box. When I went to get in the truck my waders were FROZE so I couldn’t get my legs up to step in….so I place one hand on the door a jumped into the truck. The frozen waders were so slick on the pleather seats I slid of the seat and landed on my back next to the truck (feet still in side) that’s fall 3 for anyone counting.
7. Next I grab a Lamaglass spinning rod with mono on it. This time I spray the guides with WD40. Works better then the Reel magic but you need to carry it with you to reapply from time to time. When the WD40 is gone from the tip the ICE scraping from the line well gather on the tip. Don’t put the rod tip in your mouth to remove the ICE, your chewing tobacco well taste like WD40 even after you put in a new dip.
8. The jig that you spent time on the night before that you were sure was “the one” will FREEZE to the reel when the wet marabou touches the metal when you swing the line in to add depth to the float. When you remove the jig the feathers well stay on the reel. So much for the perfect jig.

OVER ALL IT WAS A GREAT DAY FISHING. NOT A BITE BUT ENJOYED THE SNOW AND JUST WALKING IN THE RIVER. LOTS OF BIRDS AND THE SUN GAVE A CLEAN GLOW TO THE SNOW. ENDED THE DAY WEARING MY WADERS HOME BECAUSE THEY WERE FROZE TO BAD TO UNTIE THE BOOTS
 
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