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Really informative video in the article. His recommendations come from experience and are well thought out. Thanks for posting, CopperMan.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ooops ---
its a inflatable raft NOT a PDF
*** are you guys talking about? The article clearly talks about equipping a noninflatable Personal Flotation Device (PFD). You must be thinking of the Inflatable Doll For Me (IDFM) that you're buying yourself for Christmas. Not only does the original link include a video the article includes two additional important links.

https://www.soundingsonline.com/voices/pfds-overboard

https://www.soundingsonline.com/voices/lifelines-safety-and-rescue-at-sea

The articles seems to echo everything Tinman uses related to PFDs in his Ocean coaching.
 

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Can't get the video to play, what am I doing wrong?

I have personally tested my inflatable PFD, I'll wear it. No, it can't do everything but it deploys quickly and can give me a chance of rescue.
 

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*** are you guys talking about? The article clearly talks about equipping a noninflatable Personal Flotation Device (PFD). You must be thinking of the Inflatable Doll For Me (IDFM) that you're buying yourself for Christmas. Not only does the original link include a video the article includes two additional important links.

https://www.soundingsonline.com/voices/pfds-overboard

https://www.soundingsonline.com/voices/lifelines-safety-and-rescue-at-sea

The articles seems to echo everything Tinman uses related to PFDs in his Ocean coaching.
I copied the same link twice so I just corrected it to the correct link. The second link is a page of links to other articles by the author.

Correct me if I'm wrong, as good as this information is, some of it doesn't apply us in a cold water MOB situation. It seems to me a MOB gets picked up within 30 minute at the most or it becomes a recovery effort.
 

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I copied the same link twice so I just corrected it to the correct link. The second link is a page of links to other articles by the author.

Correct me if I'm wrong, as good as this information is, some of it doesn't apply us in a cold water MOB situation. It seems to me a MOB gets picked up within 30 minute at the most or it becomes a recovery effort.
Not quite that dire. Fat guys last longer than skinny guys, but even skinny guys have an hour plus, if they conserve their energy, before losing consciousness...
 

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The articles seems to echo everything Tinman uses related to PFDs in his Ocean coaching.

Yes, I do favor kayak-style foam vests with pockets, for many of the reasons cited in the article. But I also carry an orange wetsuit hood in one of the pockets, which reduces heat loss a little and provides a highly visible target for searchers. Here's a link to my newsletter piece about PFDs (scroll down a bit when you get there)

https://mailchi.mp/9b9720162f07/halibut-treasure-map

The downside of kayak-style vests is they don't provide nearly as much buoyancy as the inflatable types. But there is no perfect PFD. I really like having a whistle, PLB, strobe and wetsuit hood on me at all times.
 

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I copied the same link twice so I just corrected it to the correct link. The second link is a page of links to other articles by the author.

Correct me if I'm wrong, as good as this information is, some of it doesn't apply us in a cold water MOB situation. It seems to me a MOB gets picked up within 30 minute at the most or it becomes a recovery effort.
It does apply to us --- The extra gear increases the odds of getting a quick rescue, which is essential in cold water. Pop a smoke flare, and someone may see you quicker. Floating VHF is excellent, as is the PLB. And a red or yellow flotation jacket or inflatable vest are easier to spot than a blue one.

J.
 

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we all have to pick a point to stop adding overboard precautions. at some point they become onerous or more dangerous than not having them. going over board is a rare occurrence but one we want to survive.

so each has to decide what level of protection from nothing to a full survival suit to wear.


when over board being higher out of the water and having something on to keep warm and being able to be seen and signal are the keys to surviving. even hanging on to a large pool noodle will get you up and floating higher than many weaker life jackets.
 

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Great information. .... If you have on a lifejacket your chance of survival goes way up. In 60 degree water you can survive well over an hour. A lot depends on using the right equipment.


A tradition type III (or now the 70 newton rated PFD) only provides a minimum of 15.5 lbs buoyancy. they are designed for protected waters, bays rivers and lakes where rescue is readily available. In choppy seas they will not provide enough buoyancy to keep you from bobbing under. these devices are normally not self righting.


If you are operating near shore the type II has more flotation, minimum of 22.5 lbs buoyancy and will float you higher out of the water. they are more bulky and may not be self righting. Again they are for near shore waters where rescue is not normally readily available.


Type I devises are for off shore use and provide the most buoyancy, from 22.5 to 33 lbs, they are self righting and used where rescue is not readily available. These provide the most protection on high sea conditions.


Inflatables are predominantly type III. The do proved significantly more buoyancy, up to 33 lbs, but are not an off shore design. Canoe and Kayak vest are predominantly type III unless you get a white water rated one that has type II performance. They have their place but still they are a type III and will only provide that level of protection.


Very few people take the time to read the pamphlet that is attached to every lifejacket sold in the US that explains this. everyone is guilty of it but when you buy a new lifejacket first thing is the booklet gets ripped of and thrown away. Somehow we are programed to think that any old lifejacket will work. Choosing the right one for the environment of operation should be the motivating factor.


Dan
 

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*** are you guys talking about? The article clearly talks about equipping a noninflatable Personal Flotation Device (PFD). You must be thinking of the Inflatable Doll For Me (IDFM) that you're buying yourself for Christmas. Not only does the original link include a video the article includes two additional important links.

https://www.soundingsonline.com/voices/pfds-overboard

https://www.soundingsonline.com/voices/lifelines-safety-and-rescue-at-sea

The articles seems to echo everything Tinman uses related to PFDs in his Ocean coaching.
I am big on PFD’s and wear a foam in my Kayak, Inflatable in my boat.
It’s well worth your life.
 

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I wear a combo. I have a kent fishing life jacket which is a comfortable soft form fitting foam vest.I wear it over a t-shirt. It keeps me warm. it has about 12-14# flotation. Can wear a rain or warm jacket over it. And then if there are any kind of seas and working on the deck then I put on my inflatable horse collar vest. My idea is if I slip overboard I need to be able to swim like a **** to get to the boat ladder. I cannot do that with the horse inflated as it rolls you over on your back. If I dont make it to the boat then I pull the cord on my vest.
 

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Great information. .... If you have on a lifejacket your chance of survival goes way up. In 60 degree water you can survive well over an hour. A lot depends on using the right equipment.


A tradition type III (or now the 70 newton rated PFD) only provides a minimum of 15.5 lbs buoyancy. they are designed for protected waters, bays rivers and lakes where rescue is readily available. In choppy seas they will not provide enough buoyancy to keep you from bobbing under. these devices are normally not self righting.


If you are operating near shore the type II has more flotation, minimum of 22.5 lbs buoyancy and will float you higher out of the water. they are more bulky and may not be self righting. Again they are for near shore waters where rescue is not normally readily available.


Type I devises are for off shore use and provide the most buoyancy, from 22.5 to 33 lbs, they are self righting and used where rescue is not readily available. These provide the most protection on high sea conditions.


Inflatables are predominantly type III. The do proved significantly more buoyancy, up to 33 lbs, but are not an off shore design. Canoe and Kayak vest are predominantly type III unless you get a white water rated one that has type II performance. They have their place but still they are a type III and will only provide that level of protection.


Very few people take the time to read the pamphlet that is attached to every lifejacket sold in the US that explains this. everyone is guilty of it but when you buy a new lifejacket first thing is the booklet gets ripped of and thrown away. Somehow we are programed to think that any old lifejacket will work. Choosing the right one for the environment of operation should be the motivating factor.


Dan
Dan, you say inflatables are predominately type III, do you know of any that are Type I? Or of any inflatables that have pockets to hold the "4" safety items referenced in the video? Google didn't find any of either for me.
ron m
 

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Dan, you say inflatables are predominately type III, do you know of any that are Type I? Or of any inflatables that have pockets to hold the "4" safety items referenced in the video? Google didn't find any of either for me.
ron m

Mustang Auto-Hydrostatic is a type II with minimum 33.7 lbs buoyancy. They are comfortable enough to wear all day.....and I do.
 

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Mustang Auto-Hydrostatic is a type II with minimum 33.7 lbs buoyancy. They are comfortable enough to wear all day.....and I do.
Mustang is the most comfortable PFD that I've found. I wear one full time, from launch to extraction. I prefer manual deployment... :flag2:
 

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Mustang Auto-Hydrostatic is a type II with minimum 33.7 lbs buoyancy. They are comfortable enough to wear all day.....and I do.
I use these and they workout very well. They are a little more bulky but still very comfortable. I see West Marine now sells a 40 lb inflatable PFD or offshore boaters.
 
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