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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I can only now reveal this story.

I scheduled vacation for this year months in advance. My vacation started on 9/2. I had multiple groups of old friends scheduled to fish the record run. Two groups that I literally had not seen in decades. On that day, I fished, we caught two, my house battery crapped out, a Tekota died, My fancy new Minnkota Terrova's retractor spring exploded, and they closed the season from Tongue point to Bonneville.

So I pulled my big girl panties on. I bought new batteries, took a day off to install, and we went to Ilwaco, which was still open for silvers. We got out on the water, dropped my crab pots, made our first pass, the bite was on, we missed two, and we pulled up to run up to the top again. The main motor wouldn't start, and the control unit gave a steady beep (Yamaha for you yamaha owners) when I turned the key on. I googled it on my phone, it's a water in fuel alarm, you can fix it by dumping the fuel bowl. We motored in on the kicker to the Cape Disappointment ramp. 30 minutes to get there. I took off the cowl, pulled off the bowl to the fuel filter, and turned it over to dump the fuel and water out. I saw an o-ring fall, and then turn slowly in the water below me. I lunged for it, soaking my sleeve. but it winked out of existence and I almost fell in. Important safety tip: put your finger over the o-ring when you dump the bowl.

We need a vehicle to get parts, so we then proceeded, again on the kicker, to the Ilwaco ramp and tied up. The guys went to Chinook Marine, who were awesome, to get a new O-ring and filter. Ten miles each way. Note this.

We put the new filter in at the dock, and tried to prime the fuel separator, which I had dumped. Couldn't do it, went back to Chinook Marine for a separator, which we installed. We tried to prime it again, but the bulb didn't seem to draw. Called Chinook, the guy says, yea, when you pump against a dirty separator, the diaphram in the bulb can burst. Drove to Chinook Marine a third time. Installed the bulb, pumped things full. Motor wouldn't start. Are we doing things wrong? Remove and reinstall everything. Nothing. Futz around for two hours. Watch more than a dozen boats come in with limits.

Finally, I give up. I'm ready to put the boat on the trailer, and figure out who to to call to get my pots. I google the beep one last time. I had noticed that it now comes only after I try the starter. Google informs me that this is the sign that the kill switch has been disconnected. I look, and find that, in the frenzy, I had pulled the kill switch. I reconnected it. The motor started instantly. We went out, caught and released one wild silver, and picked up the pots. We slunk home with some crab and a slimmer wallet.
 

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Ah. My mercury 2stroker 150 did that when key was turned on.it was the reserve oil up top was low and while bobbing in boat wakes the oil would become low. I filled it.maybe 1/2 qt.beep gone.
 

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Thanks for the report. We all can learn from what others do.

Classic repair tunnel vision. It is so easy to get locked into a specific area of your system when doing a repair. Then other things which matter are not considered or even noticed.

The only way to fix the tunnel vision is to stop and take a break. It does not even have to be a very long break. When you come back your focus will be wider and you may be able to spot other things that are significant. The hard part is to realize you need to stop for a minute.

I'm still working on that myself.
 

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Man I’ll bet you felt like a bone head for overlooking the kill switch…. But…. Look at all the maintenance you got done. New water fuel separator and experience on how to replace it properly. Good on you for sticking it out, and bringing home some sea food…. Kirk
 

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Some days staying in bed is your best option.... At least your boat will run the next time out.

I always fill the separator canister before screwing it on.
 

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What would we do without Google!
Good you stuck with it and brought home some goodies!
 

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I've gone through a number of those terrova springs over the years and it took me awhile to figure out how to fix them rather than replace them.
Usually what happens is you're going too fast causing the spring to blow out of the channel. It then gets just enough slack to wrap up on it's self.

To fix this...
-Slowly lift the motor drawing the spring back into the case and untangling it to the extent possible.
-You will hit a point when the spring is just wound too tight to continue.
-Secure the shaft parallel to the water either with a buddy or a rope.
-The spring feeds into a little bulb right above the motor. This bulb is secured with four small Phillips screws.
-Remove these screws while expecting them to fall into the water and the spring coming loose and getting more screwed up.
-Once you have the bulb of the spring can slowly be untangled and fed back into its housing working from the top down.
-Pull the motor fully into its cradle, replace the bulb, and go on about your way.

Couple words of caution:
If you remove the spring from the housing you can't ever untangle then to wind them back up. Tried and failed several times.
If you wait until you're back at the dock by cramming the motor back into the cradle you'll likely bend the spring and you'll have to buy a new one.
This isn't 100% effective as sometimes the spring does kink but it'll work 90% of the time.
A new spring is about $30 from minn kota and takes about a half hour to replace. The on the water fix takes five to ten minutes.
I keep meaning to take photos for a tutorial on this but I always seem to do it in the dark.
 

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Had something very similar happen at Billy Chinook this year on my buddies boat. My friend checked everything else BUT the kill switch. He then got stressed, frustrated, and p!$$ed. It was then my turn to look things over after he had given up. I silently found the kill switch was popped and reset it, then I started the motor. He was happy and very interested in what I did. And yes Kirk, he felt pretty dumb. Sometimes it takes a different lense to look at things, and take a breather. Glad you got it figured out and did some maintenance in the process, SH.
 

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Over looking the simple things happens to all of us at some point. I fished with a fellow who was not very mechanical. We were out in his 17' Boston Whaler one time and he stopped the motor to fish. When he tried to re-start it no luck. He took the hood off and messed around looking for the problem. He went back and turned the key and the motor started. This happened a second time and I suggested he check the battery connections. He declined and repeated his first process and the motor started. The battery box is located on the floor of this open boat next to the motor well and while he was messing with the motor he had unrealizingly bumped the box with his feet.
When we got home and I went to flush the motor with fresh water the motor would not start. Without touching anything else I opened the battery box and tightened the connections. The motor started right up. That was some 30+ years ago and this guy is still just as hard headed and non mechanical.
 

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Have to say,

This was me on Saturday.

We were 3 for 5 and the bite just getting started. Eased into the sweet spot of a rip and no power with the kicker. WHAT?? Was something wrapped around the prop? Nope. Checked fuel filter; all good. Try to run motor for a few minutes and hope it will pass. No dice.

In we go and headed home.

Almost home and decided to call Steven's Marine in Tigard. Late Saturday afternoon, almost closing time. Eric says "stop by and we'll take a quick look". Mechanic is just leaving for the day, but agrees to put it in the tank.

A couple spark plugs replaced and we are back in business.

Kudos to Steven's for helping me out in a jam!!

I now have a couple extra plugs and a socket set in a waterproof case in the boat, just in case.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

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Ah. My mercury 2stroker 150 did that when key was turned on.it was the reserve oil up top was low and while bobbing in boat wakes the oil would become low. I filled it.maybe 1/2 qt.beep gone.
If that is an older two stroke the injection mechanism may fail one day. I have an ‘87 Merc 100 which I have disabled the oil injector. I mix my oil in my main tank. It works great. Once that injection mechanism fails you’ll be buying a 4 stroke.
 

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Thanks for the report. We all can learn from what others do.

Classic repair tunnel vision. It is so easy to get locked into a specific area of your system when doing a repair. Then other things which matter are not considered or even noticed.

The only way to fix the tunnel vision is to stop and take a break. It does not even have to be a very long break. When you come back your focus will be wider and you may be able to spot other things that are significant. The hard part is to realize you need to stop for a minute.

I'm still working on that myself.

This is so true.
 

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How old is this Yamaha and where are you reading these codes ?? Did you go buy a code reader like they sell for automobiles ??

I have a 2006 Honda 90 main, does it send codes ?, and is there a fuel bowl under the cowling ?, I have not noticed one ??


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Two oddball failures:

1. Sludge build up over years may (did) plug oil pickup tube - beep, beep beep

2. An old Evinrude kill switch involved a spring loaded pin held in place by a rubber cap. That cap will (did) over time harden to the extent that the pin will (did) push through and kill the system. It was only after much frustration and simply sitting there pondering was that small protrusion through the cap noted.
 

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I just want to confirm...when y'all say "kill switch", you're talking about the one that shuts the motor off if you fall out of the boat?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've gone through a number of those terrova springs over the years and it took me awhile to figure out how to fix them rather than replace them.
Usually what happens is you're going too fast causing the spring to blow out of the channel. It then gets just enough slack to wrap up on it's self.

To fix this...
-Slowly lift the motor drawing the spring back into the case and untangling it to the extent possible.
-You will hit a point when the spring is just wound too tight to continue.
-Secure the shaft parallel to the water either with a buddy or a rope.
-The spring feeds into a little bulb right above the motor. This bulb is secured with four small Phillips screws.
-Remove these screws while expecting them to fall into the water and the spring coming loose and getting more screwed up.
-Once you have the bulb of the spring can slowly be untangled and fed back into its housing working from the top down.
-Pull the motor fully into its cradle, replace the bulb, and go on about your way.

Couple words of caution:
If you remove the spring from the housing you can't ever untangle then to wind them back up. Tried and failed several times.
If you wait until you're back at the dock by cramming the motor back into the cradle you'll likely bend the spring and you'll have to buy a new one.
This isn't 100% effective as sometimes the spring does kink but it'll work 90% of the time.
A new spring is about $30 from minn kota and takes about a half hour to replace. The on the water fix takes five to ten minutes.
I keep meaning to take photos for a tutorial on this but I always seem to do it in the dark.
It's still under warranty. I'll be taking it in at the end of the season. I removed the spring, and am just getting manly exercise at the end of each run. It turns out that the spring doesn't add that much lift, and this wheezing old geezer can lift the motor just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
How old is this Yamaha and where are you reading these codes ?? Did you go buy a code reader like they sell for automobiles ??

I have a 2006 Honda 90 main, does it send codes ?, and is there a fuel bowl under the cowling ?, I have not noticed one ??


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The 'codes' are audible high pitched beeps out of the control unit/throttle. The motor is a 2015 F200. No code reading gadget required. This is Yamaha's protocol, no idea what Honda does. Google is your friend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Man I’ll bet you felt like a bone head for overlooking the kill switch…. But…. Look at all the maintenance you got done. New water fuel separator and experience on how to replace it properly. Good on you for sticking it out, and bringing home some sea food…. Kirk
Actually we all laughed. There was a rueful element to it, but we had all been through this before. Russ in particular was awesome, and everyone realized that, while it was silly, it was cheap. It was a good day with old friends.
 
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I can only now reveal this story.

I scheduled vacation for this year months in advance. My vacation started on 9/2. I had multiple groups of old friends scheduled to fish the record run. Two groups that I literally had not seen in decades. On that day, I fished, we caught two, my house battery crapped out, a Tekota died, My fancy new Minnkota Terrova's retractor spring exploded, and they closed the season from Tongue point to Bonneville.

So I pulled my big girl panties on. I bought new batteries, took a day off to install, and we went to Ilwaco, which was still open for silvers. We got out on the water, dropped my crab pots, made our first pass, the bite was on, we missed two, and we pulled up to run up to the top again. The main motor wouldn't start, and the control unit gave a steady beep (Yamaha for you yamaha owners) when I turned the key on. I googled it on my phone, it's a water in fuel alarm, you can fix it by dumping the fuel bowl. We motored in on the kicker to the Cape Disappointment ramp. 30 minutes to get there. I took off the cowl, pulled off the bowl to the fuel filter, and turned it over to dump the fuel and water out. I saw an o-ring fall, and then turn slowly in the water below me. I lunged for it, soaking my sleeve. but it winked out of existence and I almost fell in. Important safety tip: put your finger over the o-ring when you dump the bowl.

We need a vehicle to get parts, so we then proceeded, again on the kicker, to the Ilwaco ramp and tied up. The guys went to Chinook Marine, who were awesome, to get a new O-ring and filter. Ten miles each way. Note this.

We put the new filter in at the dock, and tried to prime the fuel separator, which I had dumped. Couldn't do it, went back to Chinook Marine for a separator, which we installed. We tried to prime it again, but the bulb didn't seem to draw. Called Chinook, the guy says, yea, when you pump against a dirty separator, the diaphram in the bulb can burst. Drove to Chinook Marine a third time. Installed the bulb, pumped things full. Motor wouldn't start. Are we doing things wrong? Remove and reinstall everything. Nothing. Futz around for two hours. Watch more than a dozen boats come in with limits.

Finally, I give up. I'm ready to put the boat on the trailer, and figure out who to to call to get my pots. I google the beep one last time. I had noticed that it now comes only after I try the starter. Google informs me that this is the sign that the kill switch has been disconnected. I look, and find that, in the frenzy, I had pulled the kill switch. I reconnected it. The motor started instantly. We went out, caught and released one wild silver, and picked up the pots. We slunk home with some crab and a slimmer wallet.
This falls under "The worst day fishing is better than the best day working" category. To you it was a goose egg, but to your two land-lubbing schwabs it was a rare and fun adventure and an opportunity to learn about the current status of equipment on fishing boats, crabbing and fishing techniques, the specific location details, and much more. Would be slap happy to be your boat lackey anytime, anywhere.
 

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This falls under "The worst day fishing is better than the best day working" category. To you it was a goose egg, but to your two land-lubbing schwabs it was a rare and fun adventure and an opportunity to learn about the current status of equipment on fishing boats, crabbing and fishing techniques, the specific location details, and much more. Would be slap happy to be your boat lackey anytime, anywhere.
Be careful what you wish for. He’s cantankerous at times and a know it all. And beware the pink hat. The fact he’s usually right and more clever than the average than the average bear doesn’t help.

Andrew: I’m glad you were able to problem solve successfully, get your pots and get back to port safely. Hopefully I’ll see you down North here chasing cohos.

Once the rain greens things up I want to have you, Boster, Frank and ladies up for a bbq at the Sepulchre of Fire. We have some vine maples for you.

CW
 
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