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Ok, so I bought a drift boat this year and have had some moderate success with it. I was looking forward to fishing for summer Steelhead on the Clackamas but they haven't shown up
. What driftable rivers did the summer steelhead actually show up in? If you don't want to post the river, please email me and I will keep it quiet. Any help I can get would be appreciated.

Thanks,
D.
 

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A lot of summer steelhead fishing takes place from the bank, in the upper reaches of the rivers.

Most of my boat caught summer steelhead come in March-June.
 

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The fish are in the Clack, just not in jump in your boat kind of numbers. We fished for a few hours today(10:30-3:00) and lost two below Carver, both on plugs. :shrug:

There was one small section of river that we spotted close to 30 different fish( some schools of 5 too),mostly chrome steelies with a few colored nooks in the mix too. Most of the fish we saw were in less than 2' of water, generally in the flat areas, not in the chop like you might think they should be hiding.

Fish anyhwere where the water has a little current to it. Use light lines, small hooks, and small offerings. Darker drab colors too. Just use some low clear water summer steelie fishing 101 basics. To me low water has two benefits.
1) You can see many fish moving thru the water, and often times can take note of the area in which the fish are hanging. Patterns do occur, and if you can predict where a fish may be lurking, you will have a better chance at making sure your first cast is on the $$$.
2) It is easy to eliminate where the fish aren't going to be hiding, making it easier (IMHO) to find out where the fish are hanging out, therefore making the areas to target on the drift much more specific.You spend greater amounts of time fishing high probabality water.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that the Clack is red hot and full of fish. What I am saying is if you want to develop technique (both rowing and fishing), there are fish there to practice on. If you can deal with the rafters and swimmers spooking some of the fish and swimming in some of the good holes,you may find yourself rewarded with some Clackamas chrome.

Chris
 
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