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I am a huge fan of homemade noodles. They do not require epic knowledge or effort to make, simple and easy really. I copied and pasted a recipe below that I have been using for 15 years. This is an Italian style recipe with semolina flour. You can find semolina flour in the bulk food section, or Bob's Redmill sells it prepackaged for a little more money. The flavor and texture of these noodles is it at a completely different level than anything I have ever bought at the store. It beats all fresh or dried commercial noodles. I prefer it fresh, but occasionally freeze uncooked noodles for easy use. It works for noodle soups, lasagna, spaghetti, fetuccini and so on.


Homemade Pasta Dough
1 1/2 pounds (665g) – 4 servings
7 ounces (200g) all-purpose flour (1 2/3 cups all purpose flour)
7 ounces (200g) semolina (1 1/4 cups semolina)
or 14 ounces (400g) flour
4 large eggs, at room temperature
Mix together the flour and semolina in the bowl of a stand mixer, or mix them up and create a mound on the counter top with a crater in the center. If using a stand mixer, add the eggs to the dough and mix them together with the paddle or dough hook until well mixed. On the counter top, crack the eggs into the center of the flour and semolina. Use your fingers to gradually draw the dry ingredients into the center, mixing them with the eggs. The dough will be hard to mix at first – a pastry scraper will help you draw it all together – but eventually it will come together and be relatively smooth.
Knead the dough with the heel of your hand for at least three minutes until the dough is very smooth. The dough should not feel sticky. If it sticks to your fingers, knead in a small amount of flour, just enough so your fingers come away clean when you pull them away. Wrap the dough and let it sit at room temperature for an hour.
(You can keep the dough for several hours at room temperature.)
To roll out the pasta, on a lightly floured surface, cut the dough into six or eight pieces. Working one piece at a time, fashion each piece into a rough rectangle, then pass it through your pasta machine on the widest setting (usually #1). Fold dough in half or in thirds and pass it through again. Then fold and pass it through one more time.

Continue passing the pasta through the machine, closing down the opening of the rollers a few notches with each pass (and dusting them very lightly with flour or semolina if the dough is sticking) until you’ve reached the desired thickness. Then, if you wish to make fettuccine or spaghetti, use the pasta cutter attachment to cut the sheets into the desired thickness, or cut the pasta by hand on the counter top with a chef’s knife to whatever size strands or shapes you want.

Once rolled, fresh pasta should be dusted with semolina (preferably) or flour to keep it from sticking if you’re not going to cook it right away. You can lay it on a semolina- or flour-dusted baking sheet or linen kitchen towel, until ready to boil. Or drape it over a suspended rolling pin or pasta drying rack until ready to use.

Once you get the hang of making fresh pasta, you can start adding your own touches to it. Experimentation is fun and even pasta that you think looks funny or doesn’t look perfect tastes pretty darned good when tossed with butter or olive oil, fried garlic, crisp bits of bacon, and some hot chili flakes. Actually, now that I mention it, I’m going to have that tonight.

Try adding some chopped fresh herbs or freshly cracked black pepper, or perhaps some saffron to the dough at the beginning, or experiment with different flours, replacing some of the wheat flour with buckwheat or whole wheat flour.
 

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I have never made my own and would like to give it a try.
I put two or three egg yolks in a medium sized bowl. Start adding and mixing flour until you have a dough ball you can work with your hands. Put some flour on the counter and flatten with your hands and then a rolling pin. I use a pizza cutter and cut parallel to the width of noodle you want. Separate with your fingers and drop into boiling broth with small chicken chunks. Simmer until it's done. It's how my Mother, whom lived to the ripe old age of 100, made them. Surprisingly simple yet tasty. MB.
 

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Thank you gentlemen!
Aervax, sir, you are tempting me to acquire a pasta machine. Have semolina at hand.
I have a pasta machine, but I almost never use it. You are welcome to borrow it if you want to see whether you want one. It is a high end manual crank pasta maker.

Pasta machines do make pretty pasta that is consistent in size and shape. Clean up of the machine sometimes takes longer than the length of time needed to make the pasta.

Most times I roll the pasta out on a giant cutting board and cut it by hand with a knife. The pasta comes out looking folksy and homemade. But hey, that is what it is; and it tastes the same.

If anything the slight variability in thickness and shape of home-rolled and handcut pasta gives the end product a little more variability in texture and flavor profile. My favorite food word, the variability in shape and size improves the "organoleptics". That is a good thing. When you cook it fresh it only takes a couple minutes in the pot, so that does not effect timing or consistency much.

If you want to hook up to fish together sometime - my side of the cascades or yours - I can bring the pasta maker to lend out for some trial runs.
 

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Easy enough.

Flour
1-2 eggs

Make a mound of flour on the board or counter. Put a dip in the middle of the flour. Break the eggs into the dip and mix eggs with flour until the eggs won't absorb any more flour.

Roll the egg noodles out with a rolling pin or use a pasta machine.

I happen to like noodles made of unbleached flour more than I like noodles made of semolina. The semolina ones will taste more like the store bought noodles, only a bit nicer because they are fresh.

I've used cooked chopped and drained spinach instead of the eggs, or a blend of eggs and spinach for the moisture and that makes a really nice noodle.
 
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