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Ichthyomaniac
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There are still questions about whether Oregon is committed not just to producing more and more hatchery coho, but to the hard work necessary to restore wild, naturally reproducing fish.
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">This is an important distinction, and I'm glad that it was brought up in this article. Does anyone know if the increase in numbers of fish is proportionally the same for wild fish as for hatchery fish?

There should be no letup, no backsliding, in coho salmon restoration in Oregon. This is a bright, encouraging moment in Northwest salmon recovery. It is by no means the end.
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">Right on. :smile:
 

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This is an important distinction, and I'm glad that it was brought up in this article. Does anyone know if the increase in numbers of fish is proportionally the same for wild fish as for hatchery fish?
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">To answer your question No!

Last year we had a mediocre return of hatchery fish with the millions of smolt released. They for some reason didn't fare too well. But in the same ocean conditions, we had the largest estimated return of wild coho in 50 years.

I believe you only get 1-2% return on your typical hatchery fish, but a higher percentage on wild and broodstock fish.

I haven't read the article yet, but sounds like it might be a good one.

Dan
 

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Now I read it. Good article.

It's clear that ocean conditions, more than any other factor, are responsible for the surge in coho numbers.
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">It is clear? Only God knows which factors are the most responsible for there sucess. Just so happens that the lower Columbia River wild coho which are managed differently didn't share the same success.

Returns of wild coho that spawn naturally in Oregon's coastal streams are still perilously low in some river systems.
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">I don't think "perilously" is the right word to use here. We had great numbers in some streams and lower numbers in others.

That's a credit not just to the prime ocean conditions, but also to the hard work on the ground in river basins throughout Oregon
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">There you go!


There are moves afoot in the Legislature to strip some funding from salmon recovery, and divert millions of dollars dedicated to stream restoration to a hatchery research facility.
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">Bad move.


There should be no letup, no backsliding, in coho salmon restoration in Oregon. This is a bright, encouraging moment in Northwest salmon recovery. It is by no means the end.
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">Right on! :bowdown:
 
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