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I have heard that you can bank fish at Ft.Stevens for the coho when the river opens up. Can any of you point me in the right direction as far as terminal setup, gear and maybe where to go? I am still boatless so this seems like a viable option for a chromer coho. Also when does the C. open for sturgeon retention again? Thanks for any help you can give me.
Tight Lines.
SB
 

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S.B.
When we fished off the south jetty years ago, the river and ocean was open to the jetty fisherman (check reg's). When fishing there I would use a standard herring rig and a bobber. Weight your herring down with a bank sinker or a banana weight(no Bananas!!!) as the gulls will take no time in scooping it up. It was exciting to see the salmon chase bait schools right up to the jetty. A feeding frenzy would erupt and I always managed limits. Take good traction tennis shoes and a long handled net. The guys and gals fishing out there were fun and informative. Good luck and I will expect a story...
Boxcar
 

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Talk to the woman at the old 76 station there in Hammond. She's the one that sells the "BLESSED" Herring. :shocked:

She showed me years ago how to fish for them so your bait doesn't get taken by crabs and other crustations. :depressed: She knows here stuff. :shocked:
 

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The south jetty was a mess the last time I fished out there about 5 years ago. We used to slay them in the 80's and early 90's off the jetty. It must have took one heck of a beating the last 10 years. The jetty is flatter and wider now. It used to be taller and narrower with nice drop-offs for cork fishing off the bottom without fighting rocks while reeling in.

Maybe its me, but it doesn't seem the same???

Retirement beach by Clatsop spit used to be good, don't know if its still productive?

We used to rig like we were sturgeon fishing. Used a slider setup with a mooching rig and a cork bobber stopped at about 2/3 the way up the leader (nearest to the hook). Rigged the herring head up, some guys did head down and we all seemed to have about the same luck??? About a 6oz pyramid sinker held it in place. Pretty simple.

Maybe someone will post that has tried it in the last couple years.


Good luck! :smile:
 

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The people I have stayed with the last couple of years down in Hammond fish off the beach a lot for salmon.

Later in the season is better, they pretty much only get coho. They plunk using a cork float to keep the bait off the bottom.

Last year was slow but the year before, when we had that 1,000,000+ run they slayed 'em.

[ 07-13-2003, 08:35 PM: Message edited by: David Johnson ]
 

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Steelie Ben, Fished off the rocks in the 70's. First make sure you've got a long net. Back then we didn't have to look for fin clipped. Don't mess with the waves when you're on the rocks. Terminal gear was crazy. Starting on your mainline - put on a slider with a snap swivel attached. To this slider you'll add 4- 8 ounces of pyramid lead depending on the current. Next on the line (heading towards the end of your line)came a cork/styrofoam round 2 inch diameter bobber (brightly colored so you can see it in the water). Next comes a small bead and then tie a swivel on the end of your line. So far you're looking at rod tip, slider with weight, then the bobber between the weight and the swivel at the end of your line. That's correct, your weight and bobber are reversed from fishing in a lake. Next comes a mooching rig 4 - 5 feet long. Hook it into a herring and cast it out as far as you can. The weight heads to the bottom, feed out line until your bobber comes back up to the surface and keep an eye on it. Often times you'll see the fish give it a "swirl" before taking the bait. Don't know if they were just checking it out or slapping it with their tale. If the seagulls tried to get your bait, add a few split shot on the mooching line. Seagulls are not fun to land. I know it sounds like a crazy set up but we caught fish. Your line goes straight to the bottom and then the bobber brings the working end back up to the top. Add more weight if you're drifting. Once hooked, then the fun begins to time the net between the waves. The gaff hook we had in those days was an 8 foot dowel, like the one you hang clothes on in the closet. The one going down after the fish usually got wet. If you have a PFD, make sure the netter wears it. Hope this helps.
 

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I wouldn't suggest a gaff because you need to release non-finclipped fish unharmed. Of course a softer net would be a good idea too. Back when I used to fish out there, everything was OK.....good ole' days!
 

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I have a question about the time that these fish are in close to the jetty. July, Augest? High tide, Low slack? I think I might like to try that bobber and herring fishing.

Thanks in advance for any information.
Ken
 

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I think Jennie had a post a long while back that had a great setup with a cork float. The thread had pics and everything.
 
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