IFish Fishing Forum banner
  • Are you passionate about fishing? Would you like to write about topics that interest you and get paid for it? Read all about it here!
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question for each of you...

During the course of the year, more or less salmon than expected may cross over Bonneville Dam. Aside from the fishing potential, why do you or anyone else care? If a LOT of fish come over, so what? If not many come over, so what?

Trying to button up a statistics paper which is trying to find correlation of some variables and salmon crossing the Bonneville Dam, and need to be able to state why this is important and worth looking at.

Thanks!!! Let the answers/opinions flow!! :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
Cool Texan,

Aside from the fishing potential, why do you or anyone else care? If a LOT of fish come over, so what? If not many come over, so what?
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">Lot of fish go over, mo'salmon.

Not many fish go over, lo'salmon.

No fish go over, no salmon.

mo'salmon means the fish are thriving, lo and no means they are not.

Is there something more to your question?

Brion
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,726 Posts
Nutrient replenishment and valuable addition to food chain. More fish, stronger food chain.

Indicator of watershed and ocean health. We all need healthy watersheds and salmon are indicators of how we are doing in that regard.

Huge business potential. More fish, more business. Oregon needs the business.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
One reason that healthy salmon populations are important is the nutrients they bring from the ocean. When salmon travel up the river they bring nutrients from the ocean. They become food for birds, bugs, bears, etc. which in turn move these nutreints over larger areas.

If you haven't already you should read the book "salmon Without Rivers" by Jim Lichatowich. He talks about the migration of salmon and how it helps the who ecosystem in this book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
The number of salmon crossing Bonneville Dam is really not the issue. Bonneville Dam is simply a convient place to count them. Your question really is: Why is it important to have Pacific salmon in the Columbia River? The answers to that question could fill a book. The answers could be biological, ecological, cultural, spiritual, recreational, commercial, etc.

Perhaps a bit more clarity would help. As in, for what purpose are you asking the question?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am doing a statistics paper involving salmon and the dam. One of the questions I need to address is "why is this issue important"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,799 Posts
you realy need 2 questions,

1)why is it important for native fish to return

2)why is it important for hatchery fish to return
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,443 Posts
More fish means more people fishing. More people fishing the CR means less people fishing the coast which ALWAYS makes me happier. :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
Tex - I will try to help you with your stats paper.

The "issue" that you refer to is, I assume, getting Pacific salmon over Bonneville Dam. Given that assumption, here's my take:

Getting Pacific salmon over Bonneville Dam is important:

Biologically because salmon need to return to their native spawning grounds to reproduce. Without reproduction, they will not exist longer than one generation.

Ecologically because salmon provide a food source for many terrestrial organisms. In fact, they appear to be the main form of nutrient input to many watersheds throughout the Columbia Basin.

Culturally and spiritually because the people native to the Columbia Basin rely on these fish for their sustenance, commerce, and overall well being. They were, and still are, the center of their cultural heritage and religion.

Recreationally because it's one of the most sought after fish in the world and is one of the best tasting fish anywhere. See the IFish BB for more details.

Commerically because they one of the most highly prized fish in market's around the world and they are easily caught in nets when they return to their spawning grounds. It's a enormous failure that Pacific salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin can no longer support a viable commerical fishing industry.

That's my .02. Good luck.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top