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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a regular four-foot chain-link fence across the back of the yard, with the posts sunk in a concrete "curb" that runs the width of the lot.
I am thinking of pulling the fencing, but leaving the 1 5/8 galvanized posts in place, and then sleeving over them with 5 1/2-foot 2 3/8 galvanized posts, to which I can then attach standard 1X6 6-foot cedar privacy fencing using Simpson Strong-Tie PGT2 straps to attach the stringers. Next door neighbor's fence was built this way and it is gangbusters.
Anybody try this before?
 

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1 5/8 isn't meant to be a "post" but several homeowners and some shoddy contractors may use it as a way to try and cut costs. I have sold guys 2 3/8 posts and the correct wood adapter clamp brackets to do as your talking but I just don't recommend it. If it's in an area where there isn't much wind then you might get lucky.
 

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I have a regular four-foot chain-link fence across the back of the yard, with the posts sunk in a concrete "curb" that runs the width of the lot.
I am thinking of pulling the fencing, but leaving the 1 5/8 galvanized posts in place, and then sleeving over them with 5 1/2-foot 2 3/8 galvanized posts, to which I can then attach standard 1X6 6-foot cedar privacy fencing using Simpson Strong-Tie PGT2 straps to attach the stringers. Next door neighbor's fence was built this way and it is gangbusters.
Anybody try this before?
I've never done the post-over-post thing, but on one job the owner decided to add some fencing himself.
He used those Simpson straps and 2-3/8" posts. It turned out great.
You might have to "shim" for a snug post fit.

Pro Tip :
Try to find honest 3/4" thick fence boards.
They are around, you have to hunt a bit.
Home Depot 5/8" fence boards are a poor substitute for the real thing.
 

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And make sure where you are digging! Neighbor had new fence installed. Contractor did not have utilities marked. Dug through his water line and early this week found out they cut my underground power lines partly. They finally melted, and PG&E was great getting me back up, but will bill the neighbor for work. He will go after fence company.
 

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I don't know what gauge the posts are you have, but if they are heavy wall posts go for it. My son in laws neighbor took out his chain link fence and went with cedar but I'm sure his posts were pipe and not conduit. He used aluminum channel maybe 6 inches long that would accept a 2x4 into the channel. He used carriage bolts to secure everything. Looks great and its there to stay.
 

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I would use smaller brackets on the 1 5/8" posts, get 5' fence boards and put 24" x 8' lattice panels on the top of the fence boards and 4' top rail to a height of 6'. Decorative and light weight. Use 5/8" boards. They will outlive you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The chain link posts are embedded in a cement footing. There would be zero digging. Sleeving the 4-foot posts with a larger post 18 inches taller seems like a fairly sound idea to me. Not sure what I would use to shim them, if they need shimming -- perhaps some PVC. I haven't investigated compatible sizes.
Plant Grass Wood Terrestrial plant Trunk
 

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The chain link posts are embedded in a cement footing. There would be zero digging. Sleeving the 4-foot posts with a larger post 18 inches taller seems like a fairly sound idea to me. Not sure what I would use to shim them, if they need shimming -- perhaps some PVC. I haven't investigated compatible sizes.
You have an excellent idea. Don't listen to the naysayers.
If you have a fence company nearby, you may be able to get a scrap piece of 2-in (2-3/8-in outside diameter) pipe and see how fitment is over the existing posts.
The Simpson PTG2 straps work well.
Very important to "crown" your 2x4 rails.
Try to find full 3/4" thick fence boards.
Set up your posts and rails as straight as you can get them.
Step back and "eyeball" the framework for straightness before committing to installing the fence boards.
Install fence boards.
Get some lemonade, a shady spot and your lawnchair.
Kick back and admire your work.
 

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The welder in me says get some 4x4 steel plates with the appropriate size hole in the middle to slip over the current post. Weld it to that post, then slip you new post over that, and weld it to the plate too. Or just go with the self tappers. Does the wind blow in Texas? Enough to suck Bill right out of NM!!!!!!!!!

When I replaced my fence I used pipe posts (wood just rots in the ground here), and brackets for the 2x4 cross beams. Six foot cedar and it worked great. Need to stain it this spring.
 

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I checked with a reputable fence company when I wanted to do this a few years ago. They said absolutely it will work and they have done it. They simply drill and put a large self tapping screw in to take the rattle out of the posts.
I had a dream about these self-tappers.
Impact driver and 5/16" nut driver and appropriately sized self drill/self tap screws.
I would definitely do pilot holes.
Do 2 per post.....one high, one low.
Don't over-drive and snap the heads off.

Either keep the self tappers out of the strap zones or drill through the straps as well, if you feel lucky.
I think I'd do the self tappers separately and not complicate things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
James: They call this part of west-central Texas by two names: the Rolling Plains, and the Big Country. And yes it is windy, but I haven't yet seen a dust storm coming anywhere close to what we got in Alamogordo, downwind of the White Sands. Ask me what I think after tornado season arrives ... 馃槵
 

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James: They call this part of west-central Texas by two names: the Rolling Plains, and the Big Country. And yes it is windy, but I haven't yet seen a dust storm coming anywhere close to what we got in Alamogordo, downwind of the White Sands. Ask me what I think after tornado season arrives ... 馃槵
Four years in Las Cruces...I remember those dust storms!
 

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I have a regular four-foot chain-link fence across the back of the yard, with the posts sunk in a concrete "curb" that runs the width of the lot.
I am thinking of pulling the fencing, but leaving the 1 5/8 galvanized posts in place, and then sleeving over them with 5 1/2-foot 2 3/8 galvanized posts, to which I can then attach standard 1X6 6-foot cedar privacy fencing using Simpson Strong-Tie PGT2 straps to attach the stringers. Next door neighbor's fence was built this way and it is gangbusters.
Anybody try this before?

If you are concerned about strength consider an inner sleeve also on the existing posts if you can get one in deep enough in the existing post , and then slide your new larger outer one on.
 

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It would be tedious, but you could put rebar in the existing posts the height you want your new posts, fill the existing posts with a concrete slurry then slide the new post over, duct tape the bottom and then fill that with slurry. That would add some rigidity and strength.
 

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PICTURES PLEASE of this triple sleeved rebar enforced grouted monstrosity. Hopefully it will be named after you, as one it certainly will outlive, and probably all living Ifishers. "B.ROGUE'S REALLY BIG FENCE". Future generations of all political persuasions will marvel.
 

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The weak point (if any) is right where the existing post meets the concrete curb (mow strip).
Therefore, anything added to the inside of the existing posts will not help strengthen the posts.
Cap the new posts to keep water out.
Bill has a good plan.
 
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