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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just wanting to get a little bit more info. on the whole drift boat experience. I have fished out of a drift boat numerous times and I even have limited rowing experience. My question is I am looking at a fiberglass drift boat and I am wanting to see how much maintenance is going to be put into it over time. It currently has no body damage, no structural damage, and so forth. How much maintenance am I going to be putting into a boat like this over time if I decide to purchase it.

Any info. would be greatly appreciated.
TB
 

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Ditto.

Sunlight over long terms hurts fiberglass. If she is in good health now, and you keep it out of the UV( or whatever light it is that hurts glass), it will last pretty much forever.

Mark and the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. My second part of the question is are there just a standard drift boat trailor or are there different sizes for each different length of boat. I am not sure if the boat comes with a trailor, but am just curious as to what to look for in a trailor if it doesn't come with one.
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All the UV does to the glass boat is make it not so purdy.....Just wax and buff! LOW Maint... Killer boats!
 

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There are different lengths in Drift Boats, and different trailers available. My only suggestion for the trailer is get one that balances the boat fairly well so you don't kill yourself picking up the tongue. Depends on what you want to invest. Another consideration would be how far would you pull it? If you're only going ten miles down the road you could get by with less trailer, but if you want to fish many different rivers and will need to pull it long distances, then trailer quality becomes more of an issue. It's a good idea to have a spare tire (don't ask me how I know this)
 

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UV will damage unprotected fiberglass. that's why it's painted. then the paint takes the beating. my boat is 30 some odd years old and the fiberglass still flexes just the way it's supposed to. if it didn't work this way, i would have a nifty hole in the bottom of my boat when i ran up on the submerged root in the first turn below barton on the clack last summer.

a boat cover will save you from having to sweep out the leaves in the fall. make sure you tip up the front end to keep the water from collecting.

overall, i think the maintenance on a fiberglass drifter is lower than an aluminum drifter because you don't have to gluvit the bottom every few years.

as for trailers, they're kind of standardized based on the length of the boat and the width of the bottom. either she fits or she don't.

[ 09-24-2003, 03:54 PM: Message edited by: ampersat ]
 

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I would think a 16' and 17' boat could work pretty well on the same trailer. Depends on where the extra foot is :wink: .

Baker makes good stuff. So does Alumaweld.

Welded and galvenized is great.

A new painted trailer is not an arm and a leg, so unless death is imminent, they take quite a lot of abuse to actually kill one.

If it is cheap, buy it. It will make you happy and is good for the economy!

Mark and the dog.
 

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I do not think you can go wrong with either fiberglass or aluminium. I was very impressed when I went down the Deschutes in a fiberglass boat and it literally crawled over the rocks through a flexing bottom. It handled well also. I use my Alumadrifter for transportation, anchor, then fish through casting. I do not like pulling plugs.

BTW - my trailer does not touch the water. I launch and load without the wheels in water.

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I love glass boats. I am on boat #3 right now, a 16 foot Don Hill. I wouldn't store it in direct sunlight but other than that, they will take a beating, and quiet to run. Easy to fix and to re-glass the chines. For small dings (I beat mine hard) use Bondo or some similar goo.
I like trailers with large wheels and once had one custom built with rims that interchanged with my pickup thus: no spare required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well I guess I will spill my side of the beans on the deal. A lady that I work with was given a fiberglass drift boat about two years ago. It has oars, anchor, life jackets and cover. The only thing that she is missing is a . . . . trailor. The asking price for this boat would be . . . free. "just get it off my hands" so I am now wondering if any of you know how much a trailor (used preferable) would run a person these days?? Any info would be appreciated.

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Take the boat!!! Free is a good price. You can always pick-up a trailer. Just make sure the trailer you buy (if used) doesn't have a lot of rust. I had to replace the trailer for my sled last year and it cost a couple grand.
 

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My buddy and I were fishing the Sandy when his drift boat trailer snapped in half. It rusted from the inside out. We couldn't tell anything was wrong till it was to late. If you buy a used one buy one that has been galvinized*.
 

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TB

If you can find one, a trailer with a roller across the back of the frame makes life easier especially if you don't want the wheels in the water. Launching or retrieving.
In Idaho where I came from, about all you see is glass boats. Warmer, quieter, a little more stylish, easier maintenance but heavier. I don't think you'll be dumping it off the side of the road.
Enjoy it. I really enjoy rowing mine.
 
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