IFish Fishing Forum banner
  • Are you passionate about fishing? Would you like to write about topics that interest you and get paid for it? Read all about it here!
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any info on the trout fishing? The Mrs and I are heading to Crater Lake, she's never been. We're going to stay at Diamond Lake for a few days. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,182 Posts
I don't know about the trout, but the Tui chub fishing is awesome! :depressed: I'm not sure if they got the place poisoned yet. They stocked it with small chinook I heard. Troll spinners for them Power baot on the bottom for the trout that are left in there. Maybe a trolling rig too. It's a shame, that lake was awesome once, hopefully will be again in the future. Have fun.
GBS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,052 Posts
I haven't been up there since the chubs took over. :mad: The state should have poisoned it years ago and been done with it. But, as usual, they over-analyzed everything and spent years and $$ trying half-measures that didn't work.
I wish you luck. At least it won't be crowded. I think they're still 2 years away from poisoning it. And even longer for a full recovery. :depressed:
I wish there was some way to find those responsible for introducing the chubs. They know who they are. :mad: I just wish I did.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,726 Posts
I think the primary reason the state has not treated it is due to threatened lawsuits by two different groups, as I understand it.

I don't think the state is over anaylizing anything. They have used retenone (sp?) in the lake in the past. I belive they have been trying to avoid costly lawsuits by trying other methods.

I have heard of people having good success with little pressure on the lake. Magic bait, power bait and velveeta cheese in the "cheese" hole and trolling above the weed beds in the South end. We used to do very well trolling Green Butt Skunks on the surface in front of the summer homes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,388 Posts
We motor all the way up the lake against the wind (providing there is wind) and drift with the wind. Intermediate fly lines, leaches, wooly buggers, and mini-leeches. Kills'em. There are trout. It's just not the mecca it used to be.

Mark :cheers:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Here's the most current News Release from ODFW on Diamond Lake.

Report Provides Updated Information on Diamond Lake

Accurate mapping will help fishery managers.

ROSEBURG — A recently released report provides updated information including accurate mapping and fish population statistics for fishery managers who are concerned about Diamond Lake. This information is key to the current multi-agency effort to restore the lake to a fishable, swimmable condition.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife commissioned the report through a $30,000 grant from the Oregon Wildlife Heritage Foundation. Joseph Eilers and Chad Gubala of JC Headwaters, Inc. in Bend conducted the study using current hydroacoustic technology.

"Getting an updated map of the lake along with precise volume and a more accurate fish count is essential for future fish management decisions at Diamond Lake," said Dave Loomis, Umpqua Watershed District Manager for ODFW.

The original map of Diamond Lake was produced in 1946 using piano wire fitted with weights and dropped to the bottom of the lake in about 2,000 places. Because the lake bottom is soft in many areas, the depth and volume estimates were most likely too high.

Eilers and Gubala used sonar on 120 miles of transects across the lake to get several hundred thousand readings and produce a very accurate map of the lake bottom, along with a precise count of fish and plant life. The mean depth of Diamond Lake is 22.5 feet and the maximum depth is 48.5 feet compared with the 1946 figures of 24 feet and 52 feet. Diamond Lake measures 3,031 acres and contains 68,099 acre-feet of water.

Sonar readings also showed interesting tui chub behavior. "They found that a good portion of the chub population moves from the shallow weed beds to the open water at night," Loomis said. "This is important information for at least a couple of reasons. It makes a "snapshot" population estimate more difficult, but it also shows us there can be different ways to develop possible solutions to restore the lake."

Because some chub do remain in the weeds during the night, a total population count is not currently available, although hydroacoustic analysis shows more than 95 percent of the fish targets present in the open water were tui chub. Eilers and Gubala are using other information they collected to further analyze sonar readings and provide a total population count for the lake.

However, they estimate that 10,095,000 tui chub were in open water during their readings and that the fish averaged two and a quarter inches long. According to Loomis, most of the chub will grow about an inch a year and the ones larger than three inches will spawn this summer.

The report also examines the cause of bubbles Eilers observed last summer at Diamond Lake and offers two hypotheses to explain the gas emissions.

One theory is the gas represents groundwater recharge sites in which incoming groundwater supersaturated with carbon dioxide degasses on contact with the lake. Another explanation is new volcanic activity along a fault extending from Crater Lake north through Diamond Lake. Plans have been made to sample the gas in the future.

"This information is vital to the development of potential management alternatives for improving the water quality and recreational fishery at Diamond Lake," said Sherri Chambers, US Forest Service Diamond Lake Water Quality Team Leader. Chambers expects a Notice of Intent to produce an Environmental Impact Statement for the Diamond Lake restoration project will be published by the end of this month.

For more information check out this link.
http://www.dfw.state.or.us/ODFWhtml/InfoCntrFish/DiamondLake/DL_CurrentEnvAnalysis.html

[ 06-10-2003, 03:58 PM: Message edited by: PELICAN II ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,092 Posts
"Because some chub do remain in the weeds during the night, a total population count is not currently available, although hydroacoustic analysis shows more than although hydroacoustic analysis shows more than 95 percent of the fish targets present in the open water were tui chub. Eilers and Gubala are using other information they collected to further analyze sonar readings and provide a total population count for the lake. "

This sucks.

Tag :sick:

[ 06-10-2003, 04:06 PM: Message edited by: Tagster ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,092 Posts
I don't know the numbers for Tui Chub spawning, but, lets say the 1/5th of the fish (conservative) will spawn this year, that means over 2 MILLION will spawn...producing how many offspring each?

I can't see this getting better by introducing 15K spring chinook or the WIlliamson River trout.

Tag
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,841 Posts
Our annual family vacation is to Diamond Lake. I think it started about six years ago. That year, we didn't know what we were doing, and only caught one trout. However, we didn't catch a single chub. The next year, trout fishing was amazing, and I think we only caught a half dozen chubs the whole time. The next year, no trout, tons of chubs. The next couple years fishing was ok. Last year, fishing was excellent. The lake was heavily stocked with trout last year. I can't remember the numbers, but throughout the year, many tens of thousands of trout were stocked, along with a large number of chinook. If you know how to fish the lake, you'll catch a lot of trout. It takes some moving around and trying different things. Through all of my family's experiences, here is some advice I have to offer:
1. If you're still fishing, use power bait. I can't ever recall catching a chub on power bait alone.
2. Last summer my friend and I had a rowboat, rowed to the middle of the lake, casted spinners, and caught some nice trout. Talking in the 16-18 inch range, just casting spinners from our boat.
3. There are two baits chubs love at diamond lake: worms and salmon eggs. However, last year, these, with a little bit of marshmallow was a killer combination for 14-20 inch trout for us. We did catch a couple of chub, but the trout fishing was great.
4. Go into the tackle shop at the north end marina and ask the guys at the counter. They're really nice and will tell you exactly what is working, where it's working, and how to do it. Do em a favor, and buy something from them, though. They're business has been killed since the chub problem happened.

I heard the lake was scheduled to be poisoned in two summers. They plan to lower the lake 4 or 5 feet, open a no-limit, no-restriction on trout during this time, to fish the lake out of as many trout as possible. Then in the late fall, they'll dam up the lake totally, and poison it. This will happen once all the wildlife that depends on the lake has left. I don't remember exactly how long it takes for the posion to work, but I don't think it takes long. Then, the dead fish will be cleaned up. The lake will sit the following summer unstocked, fully empty of all fish. The following spring, it will be heavily stocked again with trout. I believe that's the current plan.
Oh yeah, some of the large trout we caught had chubs in their bellies... :wink:
We'll be going there in July, I think. E-mail me if you want to know anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,291 Posts
Has anyone heard of any spring chinook caught that had chubs in their stomachs. Just wondering if this approach was working at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,841 Posts
Originally posted by FallRiverGuy:
Has anyone heard of any spring chinook caught that had chubs in their stomachs. Just wondering if this approach was working at all.
<font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica">Last year the chinook we caught were only 8-10 inches. I heard there are some around 16 inches this year, so it's a good possiblity. Hopefully they'll start chompin' down on 'em soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
If you're gonna be there anyway, ask at the lodge & have 'em tell you where the 'Cheese Hole' & the 'Shrimp Hole' are - they used to be about the best. Also, in the evenings, we used to slowly troll a fly way behind the boat onthe south end of the lake. Use a streamer, something dark.
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,635 Posts
The earlier you go, the better.

With the large population of chubs, they tend to outstrip the food supply. This leads to massive die-offs of the chubs, which then decompose and release organic materials into the water, which in turn feed huge algae blooms later in the summer. These algae blooms are toxic. My family went there last summer, and they had closed the lake to swimming because of the algae. After we left, they closed the lake to boating as well. The trout fishing hasn't been what it was, but the Williamson trout are huge. You won't be wasting your time there, but it would be best to get there before the algae starts blooming.

happybrew
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top