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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a very novice rower, with a db that I purchased used. Need help with oar setup, and yes I have searched Ifish and read all posts. When my oars are slid down until the rubber stops hit the locks, the ends of the oars overlap by about a couple inches - right or wrong? I have pinched my fingers between the oars and boy does that smart!

Also, from what I can gather from Ifish posts. Some row with the stops against the locks, and some say no. Which is it?

Thanks,
wishin
 

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Here is my 2 cents.

First off, if you have oar-rites, get rid of those (doesn't appear that you do) They are really not that helpful and will tend to just get in the way.

Second, how are you comfortable rowing the boat? I can't imagine being comfortable with my hands that close together. I would start by rolling the stops toward the handles at least 18" on each oar. That will give you about 30" (minus the previous overlap) between the handles.

I personally don't like to row against the stops, hence they are rolled close to the handles. This gives me flexibility and I can move the oars in or out slightly based on my mood.

Dan(ger)
 

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I use oar stops to keep the oars from sliding out of the locks and into the water; otherwise, I do not use them for anything.

Re: Rowing... Just like driver's seat and steering wheels adjustments, how you use the oars, and the rowers seat, is an individual thing, based upon size, arm & leg length, rowing stroke, and comfort.

In time, you will find your comfort level. If it turns out that your oars handles will overlap, you can simply stagger them one behind the other while pulling toward you.

I like to balance my oars to minimize lifting unnecessary weight all day (tips too heavy). For me, I like the oar, when setting in the oar lock by themselves, to slightly tip toward the water, rather than into the boat. Makes rowing almost effortless. You can purchase counterweights, but I find a roll of pencil lead wrapped somewhere near the handle works very well (when you find the perfect location, you can wrap them to make it look decent).
 

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If you have oar rites you can place them at the top of the wraps and then you dont have to oar against them. Then they will still hold your blades vertical at anchor, but other than that you dont know they are there.
 

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A man can fake many things in his life, things that can not, are rowing a drift boat and anchoring a jet sled in a tight hogline. :grin:



salmon hugger
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oh man freespool! If my manhood rests on my ability to do either very well right now, I might as well run out and buy a pink frilly dress. :blush:

I just can't take the pressure!!! :grin:

wishin
 

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"Which is it?" I think that the right way is pretty much the way that works for you.

I'm wider than the average bear and like to have my handles spaced well apart. I have maybe a foot-and-a-half to two feet between the ends of my oars, but I use fairly short oars because I used to boat some pretty narrow water. I agree that mashing your fingers or thumbs between the oars is just a little less fun every time you do it. Move your stops inboard, extend your oars outboard, and see how you like it.

Whether the stops are against the horns of your locks, or somewhere inboard is your choice. On most of our local rivers it doesn't make any difference. By the time you're ready to tackle big water you will have developed a knowledge of what works where.

I agree with the comments about losing the Oar-rights. Understand that this is just my own, unreasoning, gut-level prejudice -I despise them. IMESHO, if you have them inserted into your locks while rowing, as 90% of them seem to be, you will never learn the art of rowing, you will just be laboring down the river, hacking and chopping at the water and fighting the up-canyon wind. As for using them to hold your oars vertical in the water when at anchor, well, they'll do that - but what if you don't WANT your oars vertical in the water? I have found that by tweaking the angle of one or both blades, I can slide my boat 2 or 3 or even 4 feet to one side or the other without moving my anchor. I can cover a little more water and fine-tune the angle of the boat.

If you are brand-new to oars and drift boats, try a flatwater excursion or two to get used to how things work. Drifters don't have keels, so moving in a straight line takes some skill acquired through practice, as does jagging a boat right or left to dodge a rock, and ferrying. When you graduate onto moving water, remember the adage, "Keep your ass out of trouble." Generally speaking, you want your stern, your butt, pointed away from hazards. This is because you can pull on the oars using biceps, gut muscles, all your back muscles, and leg muscles too if you have a footbrace. This generates a lot of thrust and acceleration. Conversely, if you try to power out of a situation by pushing on the oars, you're pretty much limited to triceps and upper back - you can't generate nearly the thrust.

Three last thoughts...1. Sliding thru curves and coming out of chutes, remember that an object in motion tends to stay in motion. Your boat builds momentum independent of the current. If the river is thrusting you at a wall or sweeper, don't count on a little curlback to bounce you out of trouble. Begin using your oars to pull away well in advance of contact. 2. DON'T tie a knot in the end of your anchor rope. If you are running fast water or rapids and you accidentally drop anchor and the knot hangs up in the roller you can pull the stern out of a boat, or swamp it. Either way, you have big trouble. 3. Tuck your rod tips inside the gunwales while drifting. It's cheap insurance.

Have fun!
 

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If you have them inserted into your locks while rowing, as 90% of them seem to be, you will never learn the art of rowing, you will just be laboring down the river, hackking and chopping at the water and fighting the wind.

If you are rowing with your oar rights in the oar locks, you are doing it wrong.
The oar stops should be adjusted out of the way while rowing, like a foot away from the oar locks.
There function is to stop the oar from slipping out of the oar lock, if the oar is dropped.
It's not the pivot point while rowing.




salmon hugger
 

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"Tuck your rod tips inside the gunwales while drifting. It's cheap insurance."

All you newbies to driftboats, heed that advice!
It is amazing how quickly a rod will get sucked out of a drift boat! Sometimes without you being aware of it.
Been there, done that. :redface:

William
 

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NOT FOR ME... I will NOT put a ...
Knot on the anchor rope
.

Based upon Chetco River's story, I suspect he meant that you <font color="red"> DO NOT put a knot in the end of the anchor rope</font>. Anyway, that's the way I was taught, no knots, and to keep the extra rope as tidy and tangle free as possible on the floor of the boat (another reason for not having an anchor line that is longer than necessary). Also, just prior to going into a rapids, I would make sure the rope is securely in the jam-cleat.

If the anchor drops while tranversing rapids, I do not want to be tied to a boat that has its anchor hung up on the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks again Ifishers! This Ifish place continues to impress me. Where else can a newbie squid get this kind of quality advice? Looks like some of this experience was hard won too. This advice goes a long ways towards keeping my posterior out of trouble on the river. Thanks!!!!
wishin
 
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