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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if these collapsing crab pots have any hangups. I saw someones post that the crab will leave the pot once they have finished off the bait. Any truth to that claim? Should I stick with crab rings?
 

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here's my 2 cents:
I feel that they are a "crab pot kit". trying to fish as they are they aren't that great, but once you add some weight (rebar ziptied to the bottom or bricks or stones) and put a little weight on the doors, they are wonderful!
(oh yeah -- don't forget the rope and floats)

Just be careful how you tie your rope on so that they come up straight and flat. Otherwise the trap may collapse on itself if you pull it up by 1 side.
I tie mine up so they cannot collapse on me (but that means I store full sized crab pots and not flat ones) and do just as good as my buddies who are fishing $100+ pot setups.
 

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I think you have it backwards, crabs leave rings after the bait is eaten, the legal size crabs cannot leave a pot after the bait is eaten unless the doors get stuck or work improperly. Danielson pots work well with a little rebar added for weight and some weighted door modifications.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think you have it backwards, crabs leave rings after the bait is eaten, the legal size crabs cannot leave a pot after the bait is eaten unless the doors get stuck or work improperly. Danielson pots work well with a little rebar added for weight and some weighted door modifications.
What kind of weight and how much do you use for the door modifications?
 

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here's my 2 cents:
I feel that they are a "crab pot kit". trying to fish as they are they aren't that great, but once you add some weight (rebar ziptied to the bottom or bricks or stones) and put a little weight on the doors, they are wonderful!
(oh yeah -- don't forget the rope and floats)

Just be careful how you tie your rope on so that they come up straight and flat. Otherwise the trap may collapse on itself if you pull it up by 1 side.
I tie mine up so they cannot collapse on me (but that means I store full sized crab pots and not flat ones) and do just as good as my buddies who are fishing $100+ pot setups.
Ageed,I use them up on Puget Sound and they work very well,just put some rebar in them and you good to go.I hang stuffed bait jars from the roof of mine, as well as hang bait from pins.:twocents:
 

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I was wondering if these collapsing crab pots have any hangups. I saw someones post that the crab will leave the pot once they have finished off the bait. Any truth to that claim? Should I stick with crab rings?

the dannys are all i use
 

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Danielsons work great, with a few modifications as noted above. They are inexpensive, so you don't have to worry about leaving a $200 setup out there for someone (or the current) to steal. They produce just as well as my high rent setups.

The doors need some pencil lead wrapped around them to hold them shut. It doesn't take much current, especially if there's a little grass on them, to hold the doors open. That's not too big of a problem if you are tending them throughout the day and adding bait, but once the food is gone so are the crab.

They need weight added to them. I've had bad luck with rebar creating a "hot pot", but there are ways around that with grounding, etc. My way around it is to use large lead cannonballs, attached with stainless wire (zip ties work, but they break over time, and you will lose your lead). Ten pounds isn't overkill.

I prefer to assemble them, and leave them assembled, and I zip tie the sides together, leaving one side open to get bait in/crab out. This way you can store your floats and rope in the cage as well.

I bait the hell out of them. Hanging jars with clam guts, a box of tuna scraps, and a couple chicken hind quarters zip tied in there as well.
 

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Like he said, LOTS of bait. Crabs CAN come and go out of them. Check out the Toman video. But if they have a lot of good bait they are GREAT traps.
When my wife & I crab we tend the traps every 45 - minutes to an hour and they work as good or better than the high dollar traps.
We don't modify them at all except to zip tie them into solid boxes, but weighting the doors seems to help if they are going to soak. They WILL drift if not weighted, but as everyone has said, they are great crab catchers.

Good luck.
 

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I have mine weighted in the bottom and the doors weighted with (2) 1 oz water gremlin weights per door. I then plan on either a tuna head or a couple turkey legs in the bottom of the trap, and then I put two bait cups in the top of the trap. There I will put scraps of tuna, a can of sardines from the grocery store, scraps of shad, old herring, old shrimp, cat food pellets or oatmeal soaked with some kind of fish scent. The combination of something they can get and something they can't seems to be a good combination, as learned on ifish.
 

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I saw some fancy new ones with a bait box built in and the bait box and doors are now glow in the dark.


MD
 

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Bricks seem to work well for weight and they don't rust. I use the bricks with holes in them, 2 in each pot. I crimp all the hinge attachment areas on the sides except 1 for a door and zip tie the door shut to deter the seals.
4 oz. of lead 5-10 feet from the float keeps the rope from floating.
Pencil lead on the doors sounds like a good idea.
Happy crabbing, Dan
 

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I was wondering if these collapsing crab pots have any hangups. I saw someones post that the crab will leave the pot once they have finished off the bait. Any truth to that claim? Should I stick with crab rings?
This is Sandbum's modification


"I use one “360” and 3 Danielson’s – the Danielson’s always outfish the 360. I just decided about 10 minutes ago to retire the 360.

I have used the Danielson’s since 1994, in S.E. Alaska and Washington. On one 1995 trip in Ketchikan, two unmodified Danielson’s contained 60 legal males, that were a limit for my daughter and I at the time (each are allowed 5 under the sportfishing limit, plus 25 more under the personal use limit for residents).

At present, I am just starting on my 3rd set of pot’s, so the Danielson’s typically last around 5 years for me.

I have modified my Danielson traps in several ways, and they fish much better as a result. These are as follows:

Snip off all of the frame hooks, and secure all corners with zip ties, leaving one side “unzipped” so the "trap" door can be opened. This stabilizes the pots a significant amount, and simplifies opening the pots (I hate those frame hooks with a passion).


Second, snip off ½” off of the bottom of each of the 3 downward prongs on each door. This will help eliminate the binding effect that bottom sand, and eelgrass, tend to have on these doors. You can observe this by setting an unmodified pot on your lawn, where even the short grass can bind the doors closed, or even open.

Use weighted doors – either wrap pencil lead around the door frame, or drill out the center of an egg type sinker, and crimp it onto the door frame. Use 2 ounces. Of course, the Danielson weighted doors can also be purchased.

Modify all of the frame hanger hooks on all of your older pots that have doors with hooks. These older hooks tend to corrode, and bind up the door. Newer pots use a plastic sleeve hinge that works much better.

Weight each pot with 4 pounds, avoid excessive line, and use just one of the smaller floats. This will avoid these pots “walking”, due to drag resulting from the use of too much line, or too many, or too large floats. Using iron or steel metal for trap weights is a REALLY BAD idea. Metal sets up an electrical field in salt water as it corrodes (this begins immediately), and this will put a serious kink in your efforts. This is one of the reasons why commercial pot rebar is coated, and the good shrimp pots are all made of plastic (shrimp are more sensitive to electricity). I don’t mean to be insulting to anyone, but if you ever see someone shrimping with a metal pot, they are wasting their time, and will also screw you up if you set next to them. Avoid them as if they were lepers.
I use small one pound lead (lead does not set up an electrical field) ingots in the Danielson’s - you just drill a hole in each end, and zip tie them in, being careful to avoid interfering with the doors.

Tie your baitholders up off of the bottom, so the bait doesn’t get buried in the sand and muck, and lasts longer.

Lastly, it is also very helpful to use a depthfinder to just narrowly avoid eelgrass and kelp beds when setting pots. This growth (particularly the longer eelgrass that can be up to about 8 feet long) can jam doors very easily when the pot(s) are set in them blindly. The crab also have a difficult time negotiating these obstacles. If you can imagine yourself trying to walk through a rain forest with 8 legs and 3’ diameter arms, you will tend to agree with me on this.

You can deduce when this is happening by observing the pots when pulled. A pot set in these areas will come up with kelp and eelgrass clinging to the pot, and with only a few small crabs actually caught in the pot (they can get around the jammed doors more easily). The presence of little kelp crab is also a strong indicator of this. It's best to set alongside these areas in clear patches of sediment, as observed on the fishfinder. The crab tend to hang out on the edges of the eelgrass beds, and will readily attack a pot set right next to them, but out in the open".
 

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I use Danielson traps with great success. I ty wrap cement form stakes
to the bottom for extra weight. Before mounting them I spray the stakes
with plastic cote spray. This will help eliminate the hot pot problem. I
then wrap a couple turns of lead around each one of the doors. I ty wrap
the whole cage together (except one side) with heavy duty tywraps. I
ty wrap a good bait gage in the bottom of each trap and then tie on
100' of sinking line with 2 floats. I have used these traps for 9 years
and it is time now to replace them. At about 45-50 dollars per trap they
have more than payed for themselves. The nice thing is the bait cage,
stakes and rope with floats can all be reused. I only need to replace the
traps @ 16 dollars apiece.
 

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Danielson work great as for weight i use plastic pipe a round 18" long
filled with sand and cap it zip tie to trap only 5 bucks per trap.I also
use pincel lead on the doors
 

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I have gotten many limits over the years using this kind of crab trap. I also used two small size bungee cords to hook on tight the two openable upright side flaps (not the doors :)).

Inexpensive, effective, and can last several years with mininal care.

GO BUY THEM!
 

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Second, snip off ½” off of the bottom of each of the 3 downward prongs on each door. This will help eliminate the binding effect that bottom sand, and eelgrass, tend to have on these doors. You can observe this by setting an unmodified pot on your lawn, where even the short grass can bind the doors closed, or even open.
That's an interesting idea right there!
 

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i have used the same Danielsons for 5years now, no problem ever in the bay. In the salt I have added weight, i use 2" pvc filled with sand it is about 5 pounds and they do not travel. We also zip tie them shut, i have had many limits with them, i will buy them again.
 

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Have used them in bays for years. Love 'em. Follow the tweaks mentioned above, find nice fresh bait and get ready for some good dinners!

It seems like BiMart has them every couple of months for about $15.
 
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