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Fin clipping is the only reason we can fish on mixed stocks.
 

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Fin clipping is the only reason we can fish on mixed stocks.
As-is this statement is not true. Almost the entire west coast ocean recreational and commercial mixed stock Chinook fishery goes on without regard to mark selective regulations and "fin clipping". A better way of saying it might be; fin clipping can allow for mark selective fisheries to occur in mixed stock areas where they otherwise couldn't occur because of conservation constraints on comingled wild stocks.
 

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As-is this statement is not true. Almost the entire west coast ocean recreational and commercial mixed stock Chinook fishery goes on without regard to mark selective regulations and "fin clipping". A better way of saying it might be; fin clipping can allow for mark selective fisheries to occur in mixed stock areas where they otherwise couldn't occur because of conservation constraints on comingled wild stocks.
Like the Willamette and Columbia River.
 

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Fin clipping is the only reason we can fish on mixed stocks.
This is blatantly false and fake news. Educate yourself.

Also, look up the hatchery release and clip rate info online. There's far more unclipped hatchery fish than you're claiming here, and for scientific purposes.
 

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How about you do the research and post up the unclipped numbers for the CR.
I'd look at the fish passage center.
That's all hatchery releases,chinook, coho and steelhead.
 

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Sooooooooo…

When should all these coho start trickling into the Big C? My son and I have our PTs and spinners ready!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Because I already know the answer, so the burden is on you.
So provide the link/proof!

I know the answer as well!

How many unclipped fish is each hatchery releasing?!

The info is out there, and might surprise you!

How many unclipped fish have you caught that had their snouts removed?!

I've caught several!

Its all in the name of science, which you usually support, so if you dont believe me, look it up and post it here!

But 100% mark rate is a myth!
 

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OK here's some help,
So who did your homework in school?


"Today, virtually all coho and Chinook salmon produced in Washington hatcheries -- including those raised in federal and tribal facilities -- are mass-marked by clipping the small adipose fin near their tail. This strategy has revolutionized salmon management and provided an indispensable tool in the broad-based effort to recover wild salmon stocks throughout the region."
 

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OK here's some help,
So who did your homework in school?


"Today, virtually all coho and Chinook salmon produced in Washington hatcheries -- including those raised in federal and tribal facilities -- are mass-marked by clipping the small adipose fin near their tail. This strategy has revolutionized salmon management and provided an indispensable tool in the broad-based effort to recover wild salmon stocks throughout the region."

Here's one example of hatchery fish not being clipped. (Like 14% unclipped in this article)

Somewhere there is actual data about the number of hatchery Coho and Chinook that are released unclipped as well. I've seen it in the past.

While "virtually" all Coho and Chinook from hatcheries are marked, reality is there are some intact hatchery fish out there.
 

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Say it ain't so! I had the impression that soft tides in the estuary were just the thing, so invited a buddy down to Astoria for that first week of the opener.
Small tides, or "holdover" tides are good later in the month to keep fish in the estuary. They can fish good early in August during big run years if fish are already nosing in. And in the past when we had the Rogue stock SABs in Youngs Bay, those soft early tides could be great. Unfortunately those fish are pretty much gone.

So, I like to see big incoming tides early in August to push any bait and salmon near the mouth up into the river. Many of those early fish are feeding and will flush back out with the bait on the ebb.

Later in the month, fish start staging to make their run from salt to fresh water. That's when those soft tides become a bloodbath. That's why the area near Tongue point can be so good on those tides.

The good news for your trip is that there is already bait in the river, so there are likely already salmon in the river too.

The bad news is that the ocean just off the mouth isn't fishing nearly as well as it should be, suggesting the fish may not be here yet. But it could go crazy any day, and limits in the river could happen August 1.
 

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No, it said Washington hatcheries. I read it to mean federal and tribal hatchery fish have different clip rates or simply left out of the article.
 

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Man you guys start talking about data and it gets my wheels turning. I think - "Should I pull publicly available data and do a thorough analysis on this?" Its a lot of work though. Maybe if someone wants to take me fishing at Buoy 10 I can be persuaded.
 

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When trying to reestablish native runs that have gone extinct or circling the drain and close to doing so, fin clipping will often not occur in hopes they will be released in the off chance they are in caught in selective mark fisheries. There is an entire "winter run" of Coho on my home river that does not have a single fish clipped and never will, in hopes they will thrive again and are hatchery fish that naturally spawn. Many other rivers do the same or have done in the past, and will do so in the future.
 

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OK here's some help,
So who did your homework in school?


"Today, virtually all coho and Chinook salmon produced in Washington hatcheries -- including those raised in federal and tribal facilities -- are mass-marked by clipping the small adipose fin near their tail. This strategy has revolutionized salmon management and provided an indispensable tool in the broad-based effort to recover wild salmon stocks throughout the region."

Wow, using a WDFW infomercial as "doing your schoolwork" regarding getting ad clip release rate data is equivalent to doing a book report based on a review of a movie that is based on the book. Pretty lame. Yes, the Fish Passage Center has the release data for the hatcheries. It take a bit of work to query the database and the results are shown but not downloadable in a workable format. The data can be obtained from other sources including the Regional Mark Processing Center (RMPC.org). The attached tables were based on queries to RMPC. Releases are shown by 2014-18 brood years and by CR region. CECR in Bonneville to McNary Dam, CRGN is a generic category, UPCR is above McNary excluding Snake. In general though, Lower Col R has 90+% ad clip rates for all species and stocks. As you move upstream the ad clip rate varies depending on the different species, stocks, programs for reintroduction, repropagation, ESA listing status etc.
 

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