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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if this is fly fishing or fly tying. Does anyone have a killer midge emerger pattern/idea for lakes? Have been using tan foam to look like the adult halfway wiggled-out and easy dub to be the chironomid/shuck and it's been working reasonably good, but not as good as it probably could. Also, does anyone know what the clear, textured plastic wing material is on a Morrish still stone? Or any substitute? I can't find anything even close. I guess that's when you just buy the flies and call it good. Or use foam or hair wing material, IDK. DS
 

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I don’t like to fish chronomids unless I see fish rising and cruising and figure their on midges. Then I use a sz 18 parachute adams, or a black bodied parachute. I think of parachutes as a floating nymph. Sometimes they get ate…
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Forgot to add it needs to float; this is always for fishing for dimpling fish. I love these so far; I've used a parachute Adams quite a bit, but not one with a black body. And kigerfish: your third one is right in there, as long as there's enough CDC to make it float. The also need to float low low low in the film and I think that would and thanks thanks guys !
 

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Ah, I suppose is should have understood you were looking for floating patterns from your first post. Have you tried Griffith's Gnats? To add to the emerger look, adding a small bit of antron or other as a trailing shuck may do the trick. Clipping the hackle on the bottom of the fly would get it to sit lower in the film, as well. Something about that peacock material and grizzly hackle in the small size just works...and now you have me thinking about tying some with that shuck. Not sure why I haven't thought of that before!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ah, I suppose is should have understood you were looking for floating patterns from your first post. Have you tried Griffith's Gnats? To add to the emerger look, adding a small bit of antron or other as a trailing shuck may do the trick. Clipping the hackle on the bottom of the fly would get it to sit lower in the film, as well. Something about that peacock material and grizzly hackle in the small size just works...and now you have me thinking about tying some with that shuck. Not sure why I haven't thought of that before!
So, as crazy as this sounds, the more hackle I add or anything that looks and acts like a traditional dry fly or adult, the less effective it seems to be. If I trim off all the lower hackles on some of these I get bit, but not like crazy. These fish avoid the adults at all costs and I think it's because the water is cold and they can't expend energy and have the adult take off. It needs to look so vulnerable; like literally halfway through emerging seems to be the best. My foam versions work "well", and hang vertically, but the foam is still 90% underwater so it doesn't look that much like the real thing. The real adults are mostly out of the water while the the shuck with half a body in it is hanging at a 45 degree angle. I see enough refusals to make me think there's gotta be a better way for sure
 

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Something like this would be the best I can think of at the moment. Tying on a scud, or one of the varieties of curved hooks available now, may allow for floating in the film while having a portion just under the surface. A CDC, foam or polypro post, perhaps?


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I tie and fish the chromie quite a bit. But with the bead head, sits a bit low for what is wanted. I’ve actually had good luck a couple times retrieving a chromie fast…”Turbo Chromie” we call it. No idea why that works!!


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This is what I've depended on for fooling fish that are focused on emergers. It stays afloat and mimics that moment between pupa and adult as the insect is wiggling out of its case:


Cheers, CopperMan.
 

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Check out the midge patterns on the Dry Fly Innovations website. The Tantalizer might not be among the midge patterns, but it is an excellent emerger pattern for both rivers and Stillwater’s. It is a good lake fly for Calibaetis as well.
 

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So, as crazy as this sounds, the more hackle I add or anything that looks and acts like a traditional dry fly or adult, the less effective it seems to be. If I trim off all the lower hackles on some of these I get bit, but not like crazy. These fish avoid the adults at all costs and I think it's because the water is cold and they can't expend energy and have the adult take off. It needs to look so vulnerable; like literally halfway through emerging seems to be the best. My foam versions work "well", and hang vertically, but the foam is still 90% underwater so it doesn't look that much like the real thing. The real adults are mostly out of the water while the the shuck with half a body in it is hanging at a 45 degree angle. I see enough refusals to make me think there's gotta be a better way for sure
The Griffith's Gnat was designed to look like a cluster of 2 or more midges tangled up on the surface.....which happens to the midges in the wind. The fish presumably recognize the inability of the adults to untangle themselves and fly away, so target these clusters of the adults on the surface. I've seen it in action on rivers in the rockies and the Griffith's is deadly in those circumstances. Such a simple fly, too. Might be worth a try in a stillwater setting, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The Griffith's Gnat was designed to look like a cluster of 2 or more midges tangled up on the surface.....which happens to the midges in the wind. The fish presumably recognize the inability of the adults to untangle themselves and fly away, so target these clusters of the adults on the surface. I've seen it in action on rivers in the rockies and the Griffith's is deadly in those circumstances. Such a simple fly, too. Might be worth a try in a stillwater setting, too.
I have tried a Griffith's Gnat, but probably not as hard as I should have. I will now that you mentioned this. It's amazing to watch these fish ignore adults, and there's not all that many total midges, so I'm not sure if the fish have figured out what a cluster looks like, but I'll train them lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Check out the midge patterns on the Dry Fly Innovations website. The Tantalizer might not be among the midge patterns, but it is an excellent emerger pattern for both rivers and Stillwater’s. It is a good lake fly for Calibaetis as well.
I just looked at their website. The tantilizer is exactly the style, or what I think I'm trying to imitate. The pink looks the best, but it's hard to tell from the pics; I don't want it too pink lol. THANKS Jay !
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Dave,

What may also work is a fly tied Klinkhammer style and match the body colors to the hatch.
I have, but I'll work a little harder on making a better version and I appreciate the advice
 

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Great discussion. After having my xxx handed to me by people fishing tiny flies, including on a lake I have fished for 50+ years, this old dog has been forced to learn some new tricks.
So far the best I've come up with is to use a tiny plastic bead on my Chironomids so they don't sink too fast.
Plugs, those flies are pretty.
Kigercreek, I need to make some of those. Thanks for posting.
 
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