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Lets get an iFish moose hunting expedition together to help fight global warming.

...Just thought it was a funny story, didn't take it seriously.:D

OSLO (AFP) - A grown moose belches out methane gas equivalent to 2,100 kilograms (4,630 pounds) of carbon dioxide a year, contributing to global warming, Norwegian researchers said Wednesday.

That is more than twice the amount of CO2 emitted on a round-trip flight across the Atlantic Ocean from Oslo to the Chilean capital Santiago, according to Scandinavian Airlines.

"An adult moose emits about 100 kilograms of methane gas a year. But methane gas is much stronger than carbon dioxide, so to get the equivalent you have to multiply by 21," professor Odd Harstad at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences told AFP.
With an estimated 140,000 moose roaming Norway's forests, that is a total of of 294,000,000 kilograms of CO2 per year.

But Harstad said that was no reason to begin killing off the entire moose population.
"Moose have very important functions in nature. They are ruminants that eat the grass. If we don't have ruminants, we have too much grass and that changes the landscape and has consequences for the flora and fauna," he said.

Harstad said the figure of 100 kilograms of methane gas was a rough estimate based on earlier calculations for beef cows in Norway.

As is the case with cows and other ruminants, methane is produced from the microbes in the moose's stomach which help break down the roughage they eat.
Because methane gas is stronger than carbon dioxide, it is considered even more harmful to the environment. Both methane and carbon dioxide are so-called greenhouses gases, one of the main causes of global warming.
 

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Ya see, the cool thing about nature is that (outside of man) she tends to take care of everything. When ruminants burp CO2, she creates organisms that break it down into something that something else will use. It's a process that took millions of years to perfect.

When man comes along and produces in a relatively short period of time (a hundred years or so) a LOT more CO2 than what the current organism load can handle, we have an excess. Nature isn't that fast on her feet to deal with it, as again it takes a long time usually to adjust. Nature just can't keep up.
 

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Ya see, the cool thing about nature is that (outside of man) she tends to take care of everything. When ruminants burp CO2, she creates organisms that break it down into something that something else will use. It's a process that took millions of years to perfect.

When man comes along and produces in a relatively short period of time (a hundred years or so) a LOT more CO2 than what the current organism load can handle, we have an excess. Nature isn't that fast on her feet to deal with it, as again it takes a long time usually to adjust. Nature just can't keep up.
Dave, do you have any inkling of an idea how much CO2, Methane, SOx, NOx and other particulates have been emitted from volcanic activity just within modern history? OMG!!! :passout: I think you underestimate the capacity of nature.
 

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I think you underestimate the capacity of nature.
Of course when nature's capacity to absorb the effects of volcanoes, wildfires, cars, factories, coal burning power plants and apparently Norwegian belching moose she's not too shy about just cleaning house and starting over again.

Spent too much time last night watching the NASA channel last night. I know, I know, geekdom defined, but the stop action sat photos of glaciers receeding is really something to see. The oceanic current change model is also really interesting. If anyone needs me I'll be putting some tape on my already thick glasses and getting a new pocket protector....

Somebody once said that nature is cruel. I've always thought that it's more like nature is totally indifferent.

I, for one, am volunteering to go wipe out some of those square jawed moose! :grin: :food: :grin:

TF
 

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Methane is a short lived gas, CO2 on the other hand has a half life measured in thousands of years.
Recent work indicates that recovery from a large input of atmospheric CO2 from burning fossil fuels will result in an effective lifetime of tens of thousands of years.[
The principal components of volcanic gases are water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur either as sulfur dioxide (SO2) (high-temperature volcanic gases) or hydrogen sulfide (H2S) (low-temperature volcanic gases), nitrogen, argon, helium, neon, methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Other compounds detected in volcanic gases are oxygen (meteoric), HCl, HF, HBr, NOx, SF6, COS, and organic compounds. Exotic trace compounds include methyl mercury, halocarbons (including CFCs), and halogen oxide radicals.
The abundance of gases varies considerably from volcano to volcano. However, water vapor is consistently the most common volcanic gas, normally comprising more than 60% of total emissions. Carbon dioxide typically accounts for 10 to 40% of emissons. [1]
The major natural greenhouse gases are water vapor, which causes about 36-70% of the greenhouse effect on Earth (not including clouds); carbon dioxide, which causes 9-26%; methane, which causes 4-9%, and ozone, which causes 3-7%.
Man releases 7 trillion tons of CO2 burning fossil fuel every year, volcanoes release an average of 49 million tons.

Man produces produces over 140 times as much CO2 burning fossil fuels as volcanoes produce on an annual basis.

Saying that mans contribution is less than the Earth's geologic emmisions shows pejudice and an unwillingness to deal with reality.

Tank up and take off guilt free if you wish. If you give me a moose burger I will gladly repay you the second tuesday of next week.

 

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How bout US Energy Department
Here's another source that Burning fossil fuels: Global carbon dioxide emissions add up (In million metric tons)
19802004
North America5,439.176,886.88
Central America, South America623.361,041.45
Europe 4,657.924,653.43
Eurasia3,027.532,550.75
Middle East494.751,319.70
Africa534.47986.55
Asia, Australia3,556.07 9,604.81
Total18,333.2627,043.57
Source:U.S. Department of Energy
CO2 is at a pretty low energy state, and therefore quite stable, unlike the other gases other than water vapor. I am saying the CO2 will be in the air, and to a great extent the water for thousands of years. If you think a problem that stick around for thousands of years is persistant, then yes it is persistent.

For some greenhouse gases persistence can be estimated from “mean residence times,” which are obtained with simple linear models and represent the time that would be required for removal of 63% of the anthropogenic excess of the material in the atmosphere, if anthropogenic sources were abruptly diminished to zero [Lasaga and Berner, 1998]. This approach yields a rough measure of the persistence in the atmosphere of anthropogenic additions of CH4 with an estimated mean residence time of 10 years [Prather, 1996, 1998]; N2O, 100 years, [Prather, 1996, 1998]; and CFC-11 and CFC-12, 50 and 102 years, respectively [Prather et al., 1995].
The persistence of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere cannot be estimated with such a simple model because exchange with the ocean and sediments leads to a more complex behavior. Model simulations of oceanic CO2 uptake provide response times associated with CO2 gas exchange at the ocean surface of approximately 10 years [Liss and Merlivat, 1986; Toggweiler et al., 1989] and downward mixing of surface waters on the order of decades to centuries [Maier-Reimer and Hasselmann, 1987; Sarmiento et al., 1992]. But even when these oceanic CO2 removal processes are allowed sufficient time in the models to reach their maximum capacity, they can remove only about 70 to 85% of the anthropogenic CO2 added to the atmosphere [Archer et al., 1998; Broecker and Peng, 1982; Sarmiento et al., 1992].
Additional CO2 might be removed by burial in soils or deep sea sediments through mechanisms that, although poorly understood, are generally believed to require times extending to thousands of years [Harden et al., 1992; Schlesinger, 1990; Stallard, 1998]. Removing some of the anthropogenic CO2 by this mechanism may require reactions with carbonate sediments in the deep sea that occur on timescales of thousands of years [Archer et al., 1998; Boyle, 1983; Sundquist, 1990]. On the basis of such analyses, it is now generally believed that a substantial fraction of the excess CO2 in the atmosphere will remain in the atmosphere for decades to centuries, and about 15-30% will remain for thousands of years.
http://www.agu.org/eos_elec/99148e.html
 

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Dave, do you have any inkling of an idea how much CO2, Methane, SOx, NOx and other particulates have been emitted from volcanic activity just within modern history? OMG!!! :passout: I think you underestimate the capacity of nature.
If we had volcanic activity all day, every day, for decades in the volume that we create ourselves then nature couldn't keep up and we'd have a problem. Luckily she only does it here and there for a little while, giving the planet time to recover.

Why is it such a tough concept that we really should take better care of the planet than we are? Honest, it's a good idea. Even rats know to not defecate where they sleep.
 
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