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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After lurking around the i-fish website for the
last half year, I could see that I needed to join ,and get in on all the great info you guys have to offer. Since starting to fish for these
great specimens 6 yrs ago, I have not expierenced
any other addiction like it. I now have a sled and a drifter,{hence "drifterboy"}, and can't seem to get enough of this great sport.
With that said, one of my favorite techs to use, is back bouncing eggs. When I feel a salmon start picking at my eggs, my heart seems to skip a beat, followed by that massive rush of andrenaline we all seem to chase. So, with this
being the ideal time to target these chrome beauties on the Wilson and Trask, can anybody spare a little info on how these rivers are
fishing lately? :laugh:
 

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Hey Brad- looks like you are doing your back exercises there. :grin: The doc will be happy! :cheers:
 

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Couldn't make it to the gym that day, so I had to do the strength training part of the physical therepy on the river... now if I could just get the reps up! :laugh:

UG
 

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Could you give a lesson in backbouncing? What type of water are you looking for, depth, flow and at what speed do you bounce, how many times per minute. What is the setup, dropper, leader length, etc.
 
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Welcome Drifterboy.

The rivers are in dire need of some water down there but there is plenty of fishing to be had in the Bay & in Tidewater. The next rains will have those fish on the move into those rivers so be prepared for the onslaught.

Hey UG...Those are some nice fish there :dance: :bowdown: :dance: :bowdown:
 

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Its really pretty simple... a good sensitive rod with a fairly stiff tip. Slider weight with an 8 inch or so dropper. Usually 1 - 6 oz weight. 6 oz at Bonneville or on the Willamette in the spring, usually 1-4 oz on the Coastal rivers in the Fall. I like a 3-4 foot leader, 40 lb Mazima ultragreen is what I use. Dual hook setup, I like a number 7 with a number 6 stinger. Golfball size bait, eggs, sardine chuncks, sand shrimp, various combos thereof. A small spinglo in front of the bait. Maybe some yarn on the hook to get caught in the fishes teeth.

Anchor or PREFERABLY row into the top section of a hole and bounce the bait downstram till you feel the fish... then feed it line and wait and wait and wait till the rod is doubled over and the fish is stripping line. Don't set the hook till line is coming off the reel. Sometimes you let them munch it for up to a minute. If the fish goes away without a hookup, thats OK, cause he will bite another fresh bait sent down if you dont spook him/her with a premature hookset.

UG

[ 10-30-2003, 04:30 PM: Message edited by: Uglygreen ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A few things factor into the speed of the "bounnce", such as how heavy of weight you are using, to how fast you're lifting the weight and letting line out, to how fast the water your fishing in. The most important thing to feel for is your weight touching bottom every few feet. If you let your line out and you don't feel bottom fairly quickly, you don't have enough weight and need to size up. Weather you are anchored or on the oars I like to get the bait on the bottom, then give a little lift with the rod to pull the weight up, then let out a little line and set the weight back down on bottom, continue this method until you finsh the whole run, or of course hook up.
Hope that gives a little help to get you going.
 

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UG,

Your picture reminds me of a fishing story I have. A couple of year back, my neighbor and I were bank fishing a coastal river. We had walked quite a ways from the car. Time got away from us, and next thing we realize my neighbor has to get back NOW because his wife has some appointment. If he was late, he would never be fishing again. It was too far of a walk to make a fishing gear trip, then a fish trip for getting everything back to the car. So in desperation in trying to figure out what to do, I come up with this brain storm of stringing the fish along the net handle, then carrying the fish between us. Time was pressing, so it had to work. We strung the fish up, got all our fishing gear in the other hand, then lifted the net handle up to our shoulders. Net handles aren't that long, so it was some pretty close walking between us. We got a few "goofy" looks from a couple of guys who were along the river. With the 100lbs of fish (4 fish) and tackle, we each were pumping out the steam from our waders by the time we made it to the car. Fish slime all over from having those things bump back and forth between us, but we made it. Loaded up the fish and threw the tackle into the truck, then headed back to town. Made it just in time. :grin: What a hoot!

By the way, if you light a brain fart, do you get a bright idea?
 

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I have always felt that if you are backing down a river your weight shouldn't travel more than a foot. I prefer to touch bottom every 6" or so. The chinook seem to be really lazy sometimes and want it right in there face.
 
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