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5-Cents brine is terrific, and will be for the next 100 years, but minimizing the chances of food borne illness is just good practice. I hope you take the time to read the posted link, it was written by someone much smarter than myself, and who is an expert in food borne illnesses.
Trust me I know what you are talking about, my wife is a health freak earth friendly eat this eat that kind of gal. I hear it everytime I enter kitchen.

Has anyone gotten botulism or the Tijuana two steps from not rinsing? Just seems there be more tasty ingredients left by not rinsing, like all those seasonings....

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Trust me I know what you are talking about, my wife is a health freak earth friendly eat this eat that kind of gal. I hear it everytime I enter kitchen.

Has anyone gotten botulism or the Tijuana two steps from not rinsing? Just seems there be more tasty ingredients left by not rinsing, like all those seasonings....

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Several years back I got really into smoking fish. Before reading up on this subject, I played by the model of "Ignorance is Bliss". I simply didn't know what was out there and how to avoid it. But now that I know what's out there, and how easy it is to avoid, I personally don't see the need to risk it. Even though the cases of illness from smoked fish are probably few and far between, some of the diseases are fatal, and not something I'm willing to risk on behalf of myself, my family, or my friends.

I don't know many that would knowingly want to take that chance, particularly when there are other ways around it but yet still achieving the same desired result. For example, when I mix my dry brine, I leave some left over in a bag. Once I've rinsed the fish and dry it off, I sprinkle that over the top of the fish prior to going into the smoker. It develops a similar glaze, especially if done on low temperatures at the beginning of the smoke.

When I smoke fish, particularly when providing it to others who are trusting my cleanliness, my priorities are health/safety first, and taste of the product a close second. Don't get me wrong, I take serious pride in my smoked fish, but even more pride in being confident any smoked fish I give to to others won't make them sick.

If nothing else, read the article so you have the info from an expert in food borne illnesses. What steps you choose to take from there are your call.
 

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I agree, just don't want to jack up the recipe. I like the idea of shaking extra brine after rinse though.

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It is also recommended that you rinse the fish and dry it AFTER brining it, and before putting it in the smoker. Rinsing will remove salt tolerant bacteria that survived the brine.
Salt tolerant bacteria on the surface of the fish that didn't penetrate into the fish...

Meanwhile the surface of the fish gets the hottest the fastest and for the longest...

To each his own and please take what ever precautions you deem necessary to make sure your food is safe. I will not be rinsing mine.

If the hours of smoking, polished off by 20 minutes in a 325 degree oven don't kill what ever you are suggesting might be on the surface of the fish, then I don't think a rinse and dry will do much to significantly effect it either.
 

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Salt tolerant bacteria on the surface of the fish that didn't penetrate into the fish...

Meanwhile the surface of the fish gets the hottest the fastest and for the longest...

To each his own and please take what ever precautions you deem necessary to make sure your food is safe. I will not be rinsing mine.

If the hours of smoking, polished off by 20 minutes in a 325 degree oven don't kill what ever you are suggesting might be on the surface of the fish, then I don't think a rinse and dry will do much to significantly effect it either.
Kind of what I was thinking, but I'll take a look at the link. Especially when all my smoked fish starts by being frozen, which was cited as a means of killing bacteria. I think it helps take up the brine too.

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The rinse/dry are important, not because of bacterial considerations, but because it better facilitates proper pellicle formation. If you have a bunch of gunky, delicious, herby brine goo on top, you don't have a pellicle, and if you don't have a proper pellicle, it's not as good as it would be if you did. If you want that delicious crusty stuff on top, reserve some of the brine seasoning and mix it in with the honey before the baking step.
 

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So I rinsed mine for same reason MattiG said to form pellicle. Lightly sprinkled brine after pellicle formation and it turned own pretty darn fantastic. Just an FYI.

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Kind of what I was thinking, but I'll take a look at the link. Especially when all my smoked fish starts by being frozen, which was cited as a means of killing bacteria. I think it helps take up the brine too.
If anyone reads the link they will see that every concern and precaution is accounted for if you follow the recipes directions. Freeze first, cut fish into 1 to 1 1/2 inch thick, brine in low salt solution for 24-36 hours, smoke for hours, finish off in oven. The only advice not taken is the rinse, and based on the way the article is written(mixing food safety with flavor and appearance tips) it seems that instruction is more for achieving a pellicle then it is for real food safety.



The rinse/dry are important, not because of bacterial considerations, but because it better facilitates proper pellicle formation. If you have a bunch of gunky, delicious, herby brine goo on top, you don't have a pellicle, and if you don't have a proper pellicle, it's not as good as it would be if you did. If you want that delicious crusty stuff on top, reserve some of the brine seasoning and mix it in with the honey before the baking step.
Just informationally, after having made this several times and not rinsing a single time I can tell you for a fact that letting it sit until it forms a un-rinsed pellicle works fantastic. The surface becomes nice and tacky and the resulting smoked fish is smokey enough to fill my house and bring over neighbors on all four sides of my house. What ever doesn't get eaten right then and there gets vacuum sealed and refrozen. Upon opening those bags a wonderful smokiness rises in the air and attracts all sorts of fish loving mammals through out the house/office/park/boat/pretty much where ever I am.

Just saying... this recipe works the way it is written. People have made tweeks and changes to suit themselves and their tastes. That's great but it doesn't detract from the fact that the original recipe is amazing.
 

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.

Just informationally, after having made this several times and not rinsing a single time I can tell you for a fact that letting it sit until it forms a un-rinsed pellicle works fantastic. The surface becomes nice and tacky and the resulting smoked fish is smokey enough to fill my house and bring over neighbors on all four sides of my house. What ever doesn't get eaten right then and there gets vacuum sealed and refrozen. Upon opening those bags a wonderful smokiness rises in the air and attracts all sorts of fish loving mammals through out the house/office/park/boat/pretty much where ever I am.

Just saying... this recipe works the way it is written. People have made tweeks and changes to suit themselves and their tastes. That's great but it doesn't detract from the fact that the original recipe is amazing.
I agree. The recipe works fine as written. I was just explaining the rationale. That said, It's easy enough to experiment with this stage if the process. Try it with a piece or two of the same batch and the differences are readily apparent. I like it both ways, but doing the rinse and then adding some of the brine back during the honey step sacrifices nothing in terms of a nice punchy exterior flavor, yet creates a more uniform smokey flavor throughout. This observation is based on my taste buds and side by side testing in the same batch. YMMV.
 

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I agree. The recipe works fine as written. I was just explaining the rationale. That said, It's easy enough to experiment with this stage if the process. Try it with a piece or two of the same batch and the differences are readily apparent. I like it both ways, but doing the rinse and then adding some of the brine back during the honey step sacrifices nothing in terms of a nice punchy exterior flavor, yet creates a more uniform smokey flavor throughout. This observation is based on my taste buds and side by side testing in the same batch. YMMV.
Good point! Everybodies taste buds are their taste buds!

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For those Treager users;
If your heat control is a newer electronic one you will notice a small hole in the upper right hand corner. Use a straightened out paper clip and put in the hole and push. Do this a few times until the read out states 4. That should put it at around 145* on smoke. For older versions of the electronic control you need to unscrew it from the unit. MAKE SURE TO UNPLUG FIRST. Once pulled out look on the back in the same upper right hand corner. You should see a little dial with a notch in the center with numbers on the outer edge. Turn the dial to 4 and again you should be running about 145* on smoke. The higher the number the cooler the temperature so makes it fairly easy to adjust to temperatures that work best for you. Hope this helps. All though I didn't do this myself I believe the Treager web site has instructions for doing this. May be worth a few minutes time to check that out.
Another site to check out for recommended cooking temps and internal temps.
http://www.smoking-meat.com/smoking-times-and-temperatures-chart
 

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Every time I smoke salmon with 1" steaks I get like a nice smoked outside with the right texture but then the inside is all mooshy. I basically put it in the smoker and run smoke for about an hour as cold as I can get it. Then I run the temp at 150 for a few hours and it looks good on the outside but the center is always mooshy. What am I doing wrong here?
 

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I am hear by shutting down this thread on the grounds that this recipe was STOLEN from Oregon Lou.


Totally disgraceful:palm:


Dam good recipe though!!
So instead of taking it down, why not just change name to Oregon Lou Smoked Salmon?? Was it copyrighted, was there evidence to suggest otherwise? Not just a coincidence?
 

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My god people. I just used this recipe. Brined 36 hrs. Dried 3. Smoked at 110° and climbed slowly up to 220°
Whole smoke was under 3 hours. Slathered with local honey, and them finished in the oven like he said.

SWEET BABY JESUS. Best smoke salmon I’ve ever made.

Used apple as my primary wood. Anybody recommend something different on the wood? This was incredible so I don’t know that I’ll change. Can’t wait to smoke more.
 

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💥 Wow... Thankyou Shane for your recipe... 👍 When I move back to Oregon/Washington & begin catching salmon again, I will have to give it a try. My brother Matt use to give me some of his lightly smoked stergeon & salmon, and it was great. From the comments you are getting, I can't wait to use your recipe. 💰💰💰
 
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