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I recently purchased a new Traeger and thought I would give this recipe a whirl. I had a couple pounds of Kokanee and everything appeared to be going well. 24 hours in the brine, 2 hours in the smoker and I had something that looked kinda like what 5-cent had going on there.
I ended up with a couple small pieces of fish flavored, salty, candied jerky. My conclusion was that I need to cut back on the salt and time in the smoker for the smaller fish. Don't cook much but this made me feel like a scientist.

Thanks for sharing.
 

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I tweaked it a little:

2 cups brown sugar
1/2 cup salt
1 tbsp onion salt
1 tbsp garlic salt
1 tbsp celery salt
1 tbsp black pepper
1 tbsp white pepper
1 tbsp dried hot mustard
1 tbsp dried lemon peel (I used lemon pepper because that what I had)
1 tbsp dill weed
1 cup white sugar
1 tbsp Cayenne Pepper


I liked how it came out. I also put the fish up on cookie racks instead of sitting directly on the baking sheet. It kept the honey from burning onto the fish. Another tip is to put foil over the baking sheet for easier cleanup.

Works on steelhead too.



 

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I recently purchased a new Traeger and thought I would give this recipe a whirl. I had a couple pounds of Kokanee and everything appeared to be going well. 24 hours in the brine, 2 hours in the smoker and I had something that looked kinda like what 5-cent had going on there.
I ended up with a couple small pieces of fish flavored, salty, candied jerky. My conclusion was that I need to cut back on the salt and time in the smoker for the smaller fish. Don't cook much but this made me feel like a scientist.

Thanks for sharing.
Any idea's on what the times to smoke and brine should be for kokanee??

Thanks,
FF
 

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SCORE!!!!! :meme:

No, not Olympic ice hockey. I just found some of my 5-Cents smoked salmon in the freezer. How it ever lasted long enough to be sealed, frozen, and lost in the freezer I'm not quite sure. I think this may be some intended for relatives at Christmas. :whistle: But I do know for sure is that it won't last long now.... :)

RO
 

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Someone's got to know. 85k views and no one knows!?!?!

Semper Fi
I always smoke on a lower temp; 120-140*
How long is a matter of how big/thick your chunks are. I just did some steelhead with this method, and smoked for 1-1.5 hrs, and did the honey finish in the oven.

Thicker chinook will take longer. Inspect after an hour, and use a good digital thermometer to check internal temps on pieces.
 

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What temp and how long do you smoke it for???

Semper Fi
Temperature is not something to take lightly. There are some pretty nasty illnesses you can spread if not done properly. To prevent botulism, etc., the thickest part of the fish should reach a temp of 160 degrees for at least 30 minutes. Your smoker will probably need to reach 200-225 degrees to get the thickest meat hot enough. You should also bring the fish gradually up to this temp, it may take 3-5 hours + to get there. If it gets too hot too quick you get a curd that forms. After the fish is done, and to prevent bacterial germination and endospores, refrigerate it at 38 degrees or colder (freezing will actually kill harmful bacteria that may have survived the curing and smoking process.)

It is also recommended that you rinse the fish and dry it AFTER brining it, and before putting it in the smoker. Rinsing will remove salt tolerant bacteria that survived the brine.

Here is an article by the University of Wisconsin that has great info on fish preparation, brining, smoking, as well as food safety.

http://www.foodsafety.wisc.edu/assets/pdf_Files/smokingyourcatch.pdf

A couple other notes: I scrape off all the slime on the skin prior too brining, and if I have time, will even scale the fish. Sometimes scales will accidentally end up on the meat. After the fish is brined, they are easy to spot and you can peel them off at that point. Great smoked fish starts early in the process, like right after you catch the fish. Bleed it, gut it and remove the gills, as those are areas where bacteria grows. Also make sure it's iced properly while on the boat, and kept refrigerated when you get home. The better the quality of the fish going into the smoker, the better the quality coming out of the smoker!!

I also use a dry brine and have yet to have someone turn down my smoked salmon. On more than one occasion I've been told it's the best smoked salmon/steelhead they've ever had.

Happy smoking!
 

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Thanks for the rundown on this awesome recipe. It looks fantastic. Umm... I have a problem with step one though. I went to the freezer and there does not seem to be enough salmon. I'm going to have to tuck this one away for a time when I'm more successful at fishing but I can't wait to try it out.
 

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Salt tolerant bacteria, what is your take on that 5-Cents? No-rinse or rinse?

I mean I'm a firm believer if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Especially a thread that recurrs over and over for 10 something years!

I'm trying this recipe this weekend bro between service calls

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Salt tolerant bacteria, what is your take on that 5-Cents? No-rinse or rinse?

I mean I'm a firm believer if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Especially a thread that recurrs over and over for 10 something years!

I'm trying this recipe this weekend bro between service calls

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5-Cents brine is terrific, and will be for the next 100 years, but minimizing the chances of food borne illness is just good practice. I hope you take the time to read the posted link, it was written by someone much smarter than myself, and who is an expert in food borne illnesses.
 
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