IFish.net banner

181 - 200 of 209 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,619 Posts
I was able to tag a spike and my buddy got a 4pt.

Super cool experience to see my buddy who I have hunted with since I was a teenager get his first bull. We were following some tracks and saw a cow. I froze and jumped behind my buddy. A bull came out, I ranged him and my buddy made a perfect shot.

When I got my spike I was sneaking into an area where I knew the elk were hanging. Saw a spike, then another one. They started kind of touching horns and mock fighting. While they were distracted I was able to sneak into 40 yards and get an easy broadside shot. It was another perfect shot and the elk only went about 10 yards before going down.

Crazy season with the smoke, closures and dealing with various issues with my COVID antibody testing business, not to mention my normal 9-5 job. Feel very fortunate that I made it into the woods and got some fresh elk meat.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
I was able to tag a spike and my buddy got a 4pt.

Super cool experience to see my buddy who I have hunted with since I was a teenager get his first bull. We were following some tracks and saw a cow. I froze and jumped behind my buddy. A bull came out, I ranged him and my buddy made a perfect shot.

When I got my spike I was sneaking into an area where I knew the elk were hanging. Saw a spike, then another one. They started kind of touching horns and mock fighting. While they were distracted I was able to sneak into 40 yards and get an easy broadside shot. It was another perfect shot and the elk only went about 10 yards before going down.

Crazy season with the smoke, closures and dealing with various issues with my COVID antibody testing business, not to mention my normal 9-5 job. Feel very fortunate that I made it into the woods and got some fresh elk meat.
Nice job winterkill!
Way to get it done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
We had pretty good action the first couple weeks of the season then for whatever reason the heart of the rut went weirdly silent.

Still, our camp did pretty good - I was able to participate in the recovery and pack out of 3 bulls during the course of the season. I experienced one of my most epic elk encounters ever, calling in an absolute monster bull to 10 yards for a 20 second full draw stare down - I wasn't able to get a shot because he stopped behind a tree that completely concealed his vitals, but it was still a thrilling adrenaline rush.

In the end, my hunting buddy tagged a 6x6, my son, Alek, tagged a 6x6 (his first archery elk! :meme:) and thanks to my wife and her prayer group, I was fortunate to put an arrow into a 4x5 in the last few days of the season.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,681 Posts
I havent posted on this forum in a while. But I'm still getting it done.

My long time hunting partner Rich called him in to 30 yards and I made the shot. It was 20 degrees standing in a foot of snow when I shot him.

Tracked him 2 miles as the crow flies, heard his death moans (which sounded exactly like a Grizzly bear growling btw)



Packed him out with my newish war horse Chester



We were pretty much out of the snow by the time we caught up to him. I've never seen any animal bleed so much. Incredibly tough animals.

Got him quartered and bagged and moved the meat 200 yards from the carcass before dark.

Went back in at first light and a Grizzly had dug into the front shoulder bags, and left with a hind quarter. We loaded very quickly and got out of there.

First time in my life I've ever lost meat over night. We salvaged over half.



Their population has continued to grow. In the fresh snow we cut tracks on pretty much every hunt.

Its always a Western adventure up there. We had some other call ins and shot opportunities. But that was our only elk this year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
Good job GRB thats an exciting get your blood pumping hunt with grizzlies in the area. Thanks for posting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I've been stalking the threads here for years, figured I'd contribute for once. Hunted hard this year and had my share of ups and downs. Had a close encounter and messed up an opportunity at a good bull on Labor Day weekend and didn't get another opportunity until the 2nd to last day. Was sitting down for lunch and to reevaluate my next moves when I let out a couple cow calls. I was about to get up and head back to the truck when this bull caught my eye from 120 yards up the hill. He meandered through the thinned unit down toward me, wind in my face. When he hit 80 yards and slowed down to feed, I hit him with one more mew. He picked up his head and made a bee line to me. He stepped out on the old logging road at 54 yards. I had time to range him, dial to 55, draw back, stand and shoot. Once I saw the impact I knew this was a dead bull. He ran back up the hill where he came from, stumbled and fell. Double lung, clean pass through, no tracking required.

This was my first time breaking down an elk by myself. The hardest thing I've ever had to do while hunting...5x harder than the pack out. If anyone has any tips on how to navigate the rear quarters, please chime in.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
This was my first time breaking down an elk by myself. The hardest thing I've ever had to do while hunting...5x harder than the pack out. If anyone has any tips on how to navigate the rear quarters, please chime in.
Congrats! It's always going to be more difficult solo, but if you're not already doing the gutless method, watch a video and give it a try. Hams - just start at the top and filet around the pelvis until you get to the ball joint - once you cut the ball joint out, cut the tendons on the inside near the genitals and follow cutting the tissue around the natural curve of the front of the ham. 80+ pounds will still be difficult to manage solo. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Congrats! It's always going to be more difficult solo, but if you're not already doing the gutless method, watch a video and give it a try. Hams - just start at the top and filet around the pelvis until you get to the ball joint - once you cut the ball joint out, cut the tendons on the inside near the genitals and follow cutting the tissue around the natural curve of the front of the ham. 80+ pounds will still be difficult to manage solo. Good luck.
Thanks. Yeah, that's already my method of choice, but like you said, holding up an 80lb ham while trying to cut it loose was tough to manage. Not to mention rolling the thing to side two :D
Thinking about packing a come-along and pulley for the next solo hunt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
I've been stalking the threads here for years, figured I'd contribute for once. Hunted hard this year and had my share of ups and downs. Had a close encounter and messed up an opportunity at a good bull on Labor Day weekend and didn't get another opportunity until the 2nd to last day. Was sitting down for lunch and to reevaluate my next moves when I let out a couple cow calls. I was about to get up and head back to the truck when this bull caught my eye from 120 yards up the hill. He meandered through the thinned unit down toward me, wind in my face. When he hit 80 yards and slowed down to feed, I hit him with one more mew. He picked up his head and made a bee line to me. He stepped out on the old logging road at 54 yards. I had time to range him, dial to 55, draw back, stand and shoot. Once I saw the impact I knew this was a dead bull. He ran back up the hill where he came from, stumbled and fell. Double lung, clean pass through, no tracking required.

This was my first time breaking down an elk by myself. The hardest thing I've ever had to do while hunting...5x harder than the pack out. If anyone has any tips on how to navigate the rear quarters, please chime in.
Very nice job! Congratulations!

Rear hams are tough. I always tip them forward and then back while running the knife keeping the quarter on top of the cavity until cut loose. Then I Open the game bag and lay it along side the elk and with two hands set the quarter on the game bag and pull up around the hock. It get really difficult when you put a ham and a should on your pack board and try and stand. It would make a great video I'm sure. I think my days are done with that but the last bunch I have gotten solo or with one other partner have been brought out half at a time.

My favorite is to take two back boards and put half each. Then hop scotch them to the truck going just a couple hundred yards at a time. Going back to get the one you dropped empty makes you feel like your walking on air with out the pack on. I always try to find a stump, log or rock to set it on to avoid getting it off the ground again. I have always just pushed to get them out and hanging in camp for some reason. It is a job I like behind me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,681 Posts
Congrats! It's always going to be more difficult solo, but if you're not already doing the gutless method, watch a video and give it a try. Hams - just start at the top and filet around the pelvis until you get to the ball joint - once you cut the ball joint out, cut the tendons on the inside near the genitals and follow cutting the tissue around the natural curve of the front of the ham. 80+ pounds will still be difficult to manage solo. Good luck.
Spot on. With gutless method. The skin off one side you can lay the ham on the skinned carcass as it comes loose. Let it lay on the carcass as you slip it into a bag. Easier with help. Totally doable solo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Anyone hear from the “coasthunter” (at least I think that is close to the moniker) crew?
I hope we didn’t loose another good one. I love reading about how he and his family do on archery elk and later in November bucks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,619 Posts
Congrats on the awesome bull and thanks for sharing! Sometimes when all seems lost elk just appear.

In regards to skinning and gutting, carry paracord in your pack and tie legs to brush/trees in the direction you need them to go. Roll the elk on one side, then the other. Tie hind legs towards the head to get the rump. Use gravity as much as possible. Not a fan of the gutless method because I try to get as much meat as possible off my elk, but to each their own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,681 Posts
What meat do you think is missed with gutless method?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,327 Posts
A successful archery hunt is something to be celebrated by using the whole animal and not just those parts that are easy to peel off without making much of a mess.

If pack animals are available to assist getting an animal off the mountain there is really no excuse to get everything. If the weather is cold it is easy to hang the meat in trees to keep scavengers from getting any and then take time to get everything out.

The ribs of an elk are several fantastic meals, so is the heart and the liver.

Then there are the tender loins than are often left behind with the gutless method. I just finished off a fantastic chili verde using the tender loins.

Cooking with the caul fat of an elk is something that should not be missed - the gutless method leaves the caul fat in the field.

Elk skirt steak is something that should never be missed - a prime cut that gets left behind using the gutless method.

"I need to get inside the carcass to retrieve the heart, liver, tenderloins, skirt, caul fat and rib racks. What’s the point in doing this gutless ******** if you need to open the thing up anyway to retrieve the gold?” In other words, if you want to make the most out of your kill then you may as well just gut your animal first." Steve Rinella

Another issue with gutless is body heat of an ungutted elk. Dead elk retain a lot of body heat, even in cold weather, and this can have a negative impact on the meat. The weight of the internal organs also make it much more difficult to maneuver and elk while quartering.
 
181 - 200 of 209 Posts
Top