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Old 10-04-2001, 07:50 AM   #1
MP
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Default Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

I saw on the news last night that a boat capsized. Apparently the operator was to only one on the boat and the hospital was unable to revive him.

Be careful when fishing T-Bay or anywhere else for that matter. The operator of the boat was not wearing a life vest. I know if I am fishing B-10 or anywhere that the water is getting ruff I always wear a life vest.

I need you all here so I can learn how to fish!

[img]images/icons/rolleyes.gif[/img]

Anyway, be safe

Mark P.

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Old 10-04-2001, 08:02 AM   #2
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

Life vests are for always, rough water or smooth water. Things happen and people fall overboard. Bang your head on the boat and you are gone. Look at all the people that die on peaceful lakes. One of those vests that automatically inflate with water can be a real lifesaver. They are lightweight and are there if needed. Only problem, leave them in the boat when it is raining.
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Old 10-04-2001, 08:06 AM   #3
Han Solo
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

Does anyone have any more info on this accident?
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Old 10-04-2001, 08:30 AM   #4
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

http://kgw.com/kgwnews/story.html?StoryID=28157
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Old 10-04-2001, 08:42 AM   #5
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

South Jetty? Sneaker wave?

As mentioned above a life jacket is a good thing to wear. Personally I never fish alone but I'm not sure a partner would have helped here.

What can you do when your boat falls in the hole where that huge swell was a second or two ago?

Be careful at the T Bay jaws, we lose boats and people there every year.

[ 10-04-2001: Message edited by: Pilar ]
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Old 10-04-2001, 09:00 AM   #6
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

right on the nose pilar
rogue wave he was fishing out side along the south jetty

my buddy bob was fishing inside along the n jetty when it happened.he didn't go out becasue it was to rough.the bar was open though?? the big rollers we're just about breaking on the bar...
pay attention out there people!!!!!!
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Old 10-04-2001, 09:51 AM   #7
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

This just makes me sick.

A 16 foot boat on the South Jetty in rough seas by himself and no life jacket on? Man, what does it take to get the message?

The wearing of the life jacket is a life and death matter!

Put it on at the dock and take it off at the truck. You'll get used to it being on and it WILL save your life.
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Old 10-05-2001, 06:31 AM   #8
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

This was sent to me by my supervisor at work.
Please take a moment to read this...


To my friends:
Yesterday, I spent the day doing something all of us really enjoy. I was fishing for fall Chinook at Tillamook. While the weather was great and the fishing was good (we caught three Chinook and released three wild Coho), the day was not what any of us would call “perfect”. Far from it, in fact.
As a fellow fisherman, you are probably asking yourself “what could possibly ruin a day of fishing?” For my fishing partners and I, what ruined our fishing experience was being the unwilling eyewitnesses to a boating accident that resulted in the death of another fisherman. This was an accident that shouldn’t have happened. This is a life that should not have been lost this way. Here are the facts:
The Tillamook bar was open for recreational boaters to cross shortly after sunrise yesterday. About two-dozen boats were trolling just South of the bay entrance along the South or ocean side of the jetty. As you know, this area is somewhat protected from the prevailing northwesterly winds and resulting ground swells and wind waves. It is also notorious for holding good numbers of hungry salmon as they prepare to enter the bay on their way to the five rivers that converge at Tillamook. At this time of year, the devoted salmon fisherman treasures an opportunity to get “outside” to fish along the South jetty. We were among those fortunate boats yesterday.
My fishing partners yesterday were old and new friends. Darryl invited me to join him for a day of fun with our professional fishing guide Terry. Terry has been a fishing friend for several years and on days when he doesn’t have clients booked for his boat, Terry enjoys taking his friends out for fun. Terry’s father, retired Portland Police Officer Don was along, as was a hunting partner of Terry’s. His name is Jerry. ( I did get to know that he’s a very nice guy who thoroughly enjoys salmon fishing.) We were fishing out of Terry’s 22 foot sled, powered by a new 200 HP jet outboard.
We found the bar crossing to be quite comfortable and as we got set to fish it looked as though weather conditions would make for a beautiful clear and sunny day on the water. We fully anticipated a great day of fishing and a chance to get into some nice fish. Indeed, Darryl’s rod broke the ice early with the first fish we had seen hooked. After a well-coordinated tussle, Darryl found himself face to face with a 30 lb. Hen Chinook in mint condition. A few minutes later, Darryl was at it again with a nice Coho. After that, it was Jerry’s turn with another Coho. All of this before 9:00 AM! Not a bad start.
Most boats were working along the South jetty, staying within about 100 yards of the jetty itself. This was not only the area that was producing the most fish; it was also the area that was protected from the wind and rising swells. You see, further South of the jetty the waves were much bigger and the breaker line was further seaward. This posed a significant hazard, but it was a visible one that the alert boat operator could steer clear of without difficulty.
At about 9:00 AM, we were at the East end of our trolling pattern along the South jetty. I estimated that we were about 300 yards West of the beach and about 200 feet from the outer breaker line. After making our turn, we were again heading West along the jetty line. Off to the South, about 100 yards from our position was a smaller sled type boat operated by one man. The boat was heading East, toward the beach at trolling speed. The man aboard was standing at the rear of the open boat, facing forward with his back to the oncoming sea.
Without warning a large swell rose and broke over the boat and its operator, sweeping over the hull from the stern. The boat skidded forward like a surfboard at the base of the pounding whitewater and the open hull was partially filled with seawater. We watched as the man in the boat stood up at the stern of the boat and tried to regroup. The man did what many of us would have done in the same situation and, in hindsight, it was probably the worst thing he could have done.
Instead of going for a life preserver and trying to slowly power his boat toward the beach (therefore, going with the waves), he applied power to his motor and tried to turn his boat into the next breaker. Unfortunately, he was unable to complete the turn before the next wave broke over him. The boat took the next wave almost broadside and between the breaking wave and a hull almost full of water from the first strike, the boat pitched, flooded and sank by the stern within about 10 seconds.
The man was thrown from the boat into the breakers. In spite of knowing exactly where he had gone into the ocean, none of us were able to see the man after the second wave strike. All we knew for sure was that the boat was gone from the surface and that the man had been tossed out and was somewhere in those breakers. Perhaps the most chilling part of this whole experience was hearing the man yell for help. We couldn’t see him, but we could hear him. He continued yelling for help periodically over the next two or three minutes while we struggled with what to do next.
As we reeled up our gear and prepared to do something, we noticed that a 47-foot Coast Guard motor lifeboat from Tillamook was on stations about 400 yards Southwest of our position. Upon close observation of the sea conditions it became obvious that we were not going to be able to do anything for the drowning man in the surf. Trying to reach him with Terry’s boat would only have ended with another boat lost and five more men in the water. This was a terrible, helpless feeling.
We alerted the Coast Guard of the emergency and held our position in order to reference the location of the man in the water. Shouting and pointing seemed to help direct the crew of the motor lifeboat that seemed to only crawl toward us. What probably took only a couple of minutes seemed to take forever. We knew that the man in the water was not going to be able to survive for long.
Soon, the motor lifeboat turned and backed down toward the breakers, keeping the bow seaward to deflect and rise over the oncoming sea. Even that big 47 footer looked like a toy in the bathtub as it was tossed up the face of the breakers. (Better those guys that us. They are the pros and they have the right stuff to deal with this situation.)
After about 15 minutes we watched as the motor lifeboat pulled out of the surfline and made its way toward our position. As they closed to within a hundred feet, the boat’s operator yelled to us to confirm that there was only one person seen aboard the boat. While we answered, we could see two rescue swimmers on the rear deck of the lifeboat performing CPR on the lifeless body of the man they had plucked from the waves. Off they roared toward the Tillamook station at Garibaldi where a waiting ambulance took the man to an area hospital. This morning, the news carried the story that the 38-year-old man had died in the accident.
All of you know me. You know that I deal with death all the time. You know that my entire working life has been spent either as a paramedic trying to save lives or as an investigator trying to determine what has taken a life. I’m no stranger to this at this point. I’m also not immune to that uneasy feeling you get when you watch someone else die. In this case, a total stranger, but yet a man doing the same things we all like to do. He wasn’t out there to die. He went there to fish, have fun and come back home. He went there to do the same things we were all there to do. The difference is that we came home yesterday. He didn’t.
Every one of us who witnessed this tragedy learned something from it. We learned that life can be taken in the blink of an eye. We learned that the sea does not forgive our mistakes. We learned that the margins for error out there is just about zero.
I believe that this accident could have been avoided. Obviously, had the boat been in a safer location to begin with the waves would not have crashed over the hull. Had the boat been facing the sea instead of the shore the design of the hull would have kept the water out and the boat would have probably survived the wave strikes. Had the man not been distracted, alone and facing into the rising sun he may have been able to take evasive action that would have saved him.
All of these are good lessons, but the most important lesson is that a personal floatation device would have saved his life! I know they can be uncomfortable. I know they can look stupid. I know that you know how to swim. I know you can get to it in the locker on the boat if you really need it; but how often do you actually wear one? I know that I can count the number of times on very few fingers. I’m just as guilty as the next guy is. None of us wants to believe that something can happen to us. Not when we’re fishing. That’s supposed to be our fun time.
Please take a second and think about this. When you start looking at fishing in “big” water like the ocean or the Columbia River or anyplace where things look like they could get weird, take the time to pull on that vest. You know, they make inflatable vests now that lie flat on your chest like a pair of suspenders. They don’t get in your way and they don’t look stupid or restrict your movement. They make inflatable vests that are stored in a belt pouch. Depending on your preference, either of these devices is easy to wear and provide a good level of protection. The suspenders style vests cost about $60 and are well worth the investment. These vests are easier to store on your boat, too. They take up little space and fold for storage.
When I think about spending $60 for a life jacket I suffer sticker shock and look for a cheaper alternative. We all have those bulky orange type II vests shoved up under the seats in the boat, don’t we? Who ever put one on? (Mine were still in their plastic bags from the store until someone told me you couldn’t keep them on your boat that way!) They cost about $4 and you get what you pay for…not much. Hey, we don’t bat an eye at spending $60 on a new fishing rod or reel do we? Why not make a sensible investment in your own safety. After seeing what happened yesterday I don’t need to think about it anymore. My vest will be on whenever I’m in water that’s moving. Everyone in my boat will be doing the same thing, too.
I’m not trying to make a commercial for the life jacket company nor am I trying to do a public safety announcement for the Coast Guard. I’m just asking all of you…my friends, to wear your PFD when you’re on the water and use caution when you’re boating.
Have a great fall season of fishing. So far, it looks like we are going to see a lot of nice fish and have a chance at some great times! I hope to see you out there!
Your fishing buddy,
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Old 10-05-2001, 07:18 AM   #9
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

Springer4u, what a story. Whoever wrote this piece gave a very concise and chilling accounting of the accident. What else can you say. It sure made me think about the PFDs on my boat.

[ 10-05-2001: Message edited by: Pilar ]
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Old 10-05-2001, 07:52 AM   #10
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

Thank you for sharing the chilling account of the unfortunate disaster on Wednesday.
The ocean is an entity that demands respect and preparation. I am frequently amazed by what I see. Last week I saw a pontoon boat 1/2 mile outside the jetties. Two weeks ago I saw a guy rowing a 12 foot boat along the inside of the south jetty. I frequently see boats testing the boundry of the breakers at the point of the south jetty. Every time, I wonder to myself why people would put themselves in such situations.

The shore break below the south jetty was much futher out than usual yesterday, a combination of steep swells and an off-shore wind. From the ocean side, one just can not see the waves turning over. It's easy to imagine how one could get too close, get caught riding down the face of a swell only to have it break.

The ocean is an unforgiving teacher. My vest goes on before I leave the dock when I know I'm heading out. I let people know I'm going and what my schedule is. Most important, I think I know my limits, my boat's limits and I try to keep my attention on what's happening around me.

It's very saddening that someone lost their life. Let's all take some strength from that and keep ourselves out of harm's way.

[ 10-05-2001: Message edited by: Pete ]
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Old 10-05-2001, 08:02 AM   #11
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

To relate springer4you's message to another sport:
In my earlier years of aviation, I was a skydiver pilot. The FAA requires an emergency parachute to be available to all occupants of an aircraft in which an intentional parachute jump is to be made.

Sound Familiar? "Be available to . . .?"

When things "go to hades in a handbasket," it often happens so fast that there's no time to put on a life jacket or parachute.

What a hard thing to have to watch and not be able to help. The right decisions are often difficult to make.

Recognize "higher risk" and "deteriorating situations," make early decisions.

[ 10-05-2001: Message edited by: Vinny ]
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Old 10-05-2001, 02:49 PM   #12
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

It was just last weekend that while making a too wide turn near the east end of where this happened I realized the swell was taller away from the jetty. It doesn't make sense to me why, but it does. I was headed into the waves and saw it coming, I knew it wasn't too hazardous, but, the sound of my exposed kicker exhaust as I came down the backside was plenty of lesson for me.
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Old 10-05-2001, 07:05 PM   #13
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

I've just returned from Australia where I was fishing 13+ hours a day from the shore (croc bait) and 20' boat. I was wearing a belt-mounted SoSpenders CO2 life jacket-in-a-pouch at all times. The weather was 100 F and everyone was sweating. At 2lbs, I didn't notice the weight or suffer any other inconvenience.

In two weeks I'll be on the Skeena wearing 5 layers under/ over my waders. Yet again the outermost layer will be that belt pouch PFD.

I think I paid $70 from Bass Pro plus another $15 for a spare CO2 cartridge. It's the best $85 I spent on fishing gear in the almost-three years I've owned it.

The only caution is that you have to be conscious to pull the ripcord and inflate the vest (which lays out in front of you: you then lift it up over your head and you're out of the water). There are models that automatically inflate, but I'm so often wet that I don't think that they'd work for me.

Sorry to read about yet another drowning this year, too.
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Old 10-07-2001, 07:40 AM   #14
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

Springer4You,
Thank you for your detailed account of the Tragic accident that happened to a fishing friend of mine. Kevin was a great person and knew how to operate boats well in the ocean and other water. He got me into my 50 # Halibut earlier this year as was a nice easy going fisherman that wanted nothing else but to get people into fish and help them out with his suggestions when in need. My friend in Garibaldi whom I met Kevin through is a Best Friend of Kevin and is still floorboarded over the accident. I say IS because Kevin will always be in our hearts and minds as we continue to fish .
It is really sad he didn't wear a vest that Day, We are misssing him and will make it a poiont we have one on when we go out there .
Thanks for the story of what had hapeened. As of yesterday, we still did not know of the details of how or what happened too clearly. I will print your Story and get a copy to my friend Rudy in Tillamook. God Bleess you.
Thanks Again, Hummingbird [img]images/icons/frown.gif[/img] [img]images/icons/frown.gif[/img] [img]images/icons/frown.gif[/img]
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Old 10-07-2001, 08:48 AM   #15
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

Recognize "higher risk" and "deteriorating situations," make early decisions.

Very good advice.

My heart goes out to Kevin's friends and family. Having been too close to trouble in this area before it strikes very close to home.

Please be careful. It's just a few fish and it's not worth risking your life unnecessarly.
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Old 10-07-2001, 09:40 AM   #16
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Default Re: Fatality on T-Bay yesterday

Hummingbird,
I might not of known Your friend before, But after reading this story(that I did not write) I felt like I had known him for a very long time.
Im so sorry for your loss.
It's sad that something tragic like this has to happen before we wake up and realize how important our PFD's really are.

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