WDFW & ODW Winter & Spring Wrap Up Info. - www.ifish.net
The Oregonian's Bill Monroe!

Go Back   www.ifish.net > Ifish Fishing and Hunting > Ifish Community

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-02-2010, 09:31 PM   #1
ccw
King Salmon
 
ccw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 8,766
Default WDFW & ODW Winter & Spring Wrap Up Info.

Here's some info, sorry if it has already been posted. Web link at bottom since the table is not tabulated right. C.W.

OREGON AND WASHINGTON DEPARTMENTS OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
JOINT STAFF REPORT – WINTER/SPRING FACT SHEET
2010 PRELIMINARY SUMMARY
July 1, 2010


Stock Status

Total Spring Chinook

The total spring Chinook run is comprised of upriver, Willamette, Lower Columbia (Cowlitz, Kalama, Lewis, Sandy) and Select Area spring Chinook.
The total spring Chinook pre-season forecast was 559,900 fish to the Columbia River.
Upriver Spring Chinook

The pre-season forecast was 470,000 adult upriver fish. The preliminary final run size estimate is 315,100 adults (67% of forecast).
Bonneville Dam counts between January 1 and June 15 totaled 277,400 adult and 16,300 jack Chinook.
Willamette Spring Chinook

The pre-season forecast for Willamette spring Chinook was 62,700 fish (adults and jacks), with an estimated 25% of the return being unmarked.
The Willamette Falls counts between January 1 and June 24 totaled 53,200 adult and 1,246 jack Chinook. The spring Chinook counting period continues through August 15. To date, 85,800 Willamette spring Chinook can be accounted for from fisheries and passage.
Wild Winter Steelhead

The pre-season forecast for wild winter steelhead was 20,000 fish. The actual run size will be determined in December. Indicators suggest the actual return is similar to forecast.
Management Guidelines and Considerations

Fisheries operated under management guidelines included in:
o The 2008-2017 U.S. v Oregon Management Agreement (2008-2017 MA)
o The Willamette River Fisheries Management and Evaluation Plan (FMEP)
o 2010 Washington and Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission guidelines
o 2006-2009 Sturgeon Management Agreement (extended through 2010)
Policy guidelines for non-treaty spring Chinook fisheries adopted by the Oregon and Washington Fish and Wildlife Commissions allocated available Endangered Species Act (ESA) impacts for upriver spring Chinook among the various fisheries. In order to comply with catch-balancing provisions of the 2008-2017 MA, Washington and Oregon adopted a method for translating the guidance each received from their respective Commissions to shares of available harvest (upriver-stock kept-catch plus release-mortalities) available to each non-treaty fishery.
In addition to allocating available harvest among the various non-treaty fisheries, guidance from the Oregon and Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission specified the proportion of each share that was to be used before and after the run-size update. In addition, the 2008-2017 MA also specified a basis by which Oregon and Washington would set management guidelines prior to the run-size update.
Fisheries Review

Recreational Fisheries

Recreational spring Chinook fisheries below Bonneville Dam
o Under permanent rules, the Columbia River was open for Chinook retention 7 days per week during January and February from Buoy 10 upstream to the I-5 Bridge with a two fish daily limit. Catch totaled 128 Chinook kept and 40 released from 7,614 angler trips. Catch and effort was very high compared to previous years.
o Under temporary rules, the area from Buoy 10 upstream to the I-5 Bridge was open 7 days per week for Chinook retention with a one Chinook daily bag limit from March 1 through April 18, except closed March 9, 16, 23 and 30. Catch (March-April) totaled 26,256 Chinook kept and 3,974 released from 148,947 angler trips.
o Under temporary rules, the area from the I-5 Bridge upstream to the Bonneville Dam was open 7 days per week with a one Chinook daily bag limit from March 1-14 (except closed March 9) and 3 days per week (Thu-Sat) from March 15 - April 3. Only bank angling was allowed in the area upstream of the I-205 Bridge. Catch totaled 2,863 Chinook kept and 422 released from 15,214 angler trips.
o No emergency action was taken in-season for recreational fisheries below Bonneville Dam. Total Chinook catch below Bonneville includes 29,247 kept and 4,436 released from 171,775 angler trips.
o During February through April, winter steelhead catch is estimated at 946 kept and 218 released.
The area from Bonneville Dam upstream to McNary Dam (Zone 6), except for specific fishing sanctuaries, was scheduled to be open for Chinook retention (2 fish daily limit) from March 16 – May 31. The fishery closed on May 10 because the guideline was reached due to higher than expected catch rates. Catch in this fishery is estimated at 3,075 Chinook kept and 831 released.
The Ringold sport fishery was open during May 1 through May 22. The fishery closed prior to the scheduled closure date of June 16 in response to a run size downgrade for upriver Chinook. Catch is estimated at 466 Chinook kept and 44 released.
The Snake River sport fishery was open to Chinook retention during April 24 through May 22. The fishery closed prior to the scheduled closure date of June 16 in response to a run size downgrade for upriver Chinook. Catch is estimated at 1,663 Chinook kept and 199 released.
Under permanent rules the steelhead fishery opened below the I-5 Bridge on May 16.
The Wanapum Band harvested 13 Chinook in a tribal fishery.
Non-Treaty Commercial Salmon Fisheries

Mainstem spring Chinook commercial fisheries
o The 2010 commercial spring Chinook fishery consisted of two fishing periods, totaling 16 hours. The fishery took place from the Columbia River mouth upstream to the I-205 Bridge. Tangle-net gear (≤4 - inch mesh) was used in both periods.
o The first period occurred on March 30 for 12 hours (noon to midnight). Catch totaled 3,119 Chinook kept and 588 released from 174 deliveries. A second and final fishing period occurred on April 7 for four hours (5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.). Catch totaled 6,008 Chinook kept and 1,112 released from 198 deliveries.
o Chinook landings totaled 9,127 for the spring season and 80 Chinook landed during the winter sturgeon fishery. Wild winter steelhead mortalities total 91 fish.
Select Area spring Chinook fisheries
o Select Area winter and spring commercial fisheries occurred during February 21 through June 11.
o The combined landings of 23,862 spring Chinook were the highest ever recorded and far exceeded expectations, especially in Youngs Bay where landings totaled 19,764 Chinook. Impacts to upriver stock spring Chinook were also much greater than predicted primarily due to an unusually high abundance in Youngs Bay in mid-April.
Treaty Fisheries

The 2010 treaty sturgeon guideline for all of Zone 6 is 2,735 white sturgeon. Sturgeon setline fisheries are open under permanent regulations January 1-31. A total of 131 sturgeon were landed during this fishery.
A gillnet season occurred from February 7 through March 21. No mesh restrictions were in place and sales of platform caught fish were allowed. Landings included 2,118 white sturgeon, zero Chinook, 12 steelhead, and one walleye. Bonneville Pool closed for sales of fish on February 12.
Permit C&S gillnet fisheries occurred in Zone 6 for spring Chinook. Catch was 8,600 Chinook.
Weekly commercial fishing periods took place during April 27-30 and May 11-14. Landings include 27,938 Chinook, 85 steelhead and 35 walleye. An additional 510 adult Chinook were landed from platform and hook and line fisheries when commercial Zone 6 gillnet fisheries were closed.
Yakama, Warm Springs and Umatilla tribes conducted C&S fisheries on the mainstem Columbia River immediately below Bonneville Dam as prescribed in individual Memoranda of Agreement (MOAs) with the Washington and Oregon Departments of Fish and Wildlife. Landings included 5,120 adult and 122 jack Chinook, and no steelhead.
Effective May 22, the tribes closed all ongoing mainstem fisheries (platform hook and line) in response to the run size downgrade and ESA concerns. Chinook catch from all mainstem treaty fisheries is estimated at 42,168 fish.
Summary of Catch Balancing and ESA Impacts

Catch Balancing
The primary objectives of the 2008-17 MA are to stay within ESA limits and to balance the catch of non-treaty and treaty fisheries. Under the MA, non-treaty catch should roughly match the allowable treaty catch as per Table 1A of the agreement. In most circumstances, catch balance requirements are more restrictive than ESA limits for non-treaty fisheries.
For 2010, catch balancing provisions of the MA require Oregon and Washington to assume a run-size no more than 70% of the pre-season forecast of 470,000 (30% buffer) when designing non-treaty fisheries scheduled to occur prior to the run size update. This equated to a run size of 329,000 (Table 1).
For 2010, because of the large uncertainty in the pre-season forecast, Oregon and Washington opted to be more conservative than what was required under the MA and designed non-treaty fisheries under the assumption that the run size was no more than 60% of the pre-season forecast (40% buffer). This equated to a run size of 282,000.
In 2010, treaty fisheries harvested 42,168 fish and non-treaty fisheries harvested 37,919 fish.
ESA Impacts
Pre-season ESA impacts to upriver spring Chinook were limited to 2.6% for non-treaty and 13.4% for treaty fisheries. The final run size estimate of 315,100 provides ESA impact limits of 2.2% for non-treaty fisheries and 10.8% for treaty fisheries.
Post-season, non-treaty impacts to listed upriver spring Chinook are estimated to be 1.07% in sport fisheries and 0.88% in commercial fisheries, for a total of 1.95%, or 89% of the 2.2% limit (Table 1).
Treaty impacts to listed upriver spring Chinook are estimated at 13.38% compared to the limit of 10.8%.
Upriver spring Chinook impacts for treaty and non-treaty fisheries combined total 15.33 % impact, or 118% of the total ESA limit of 13.0%.
Wild winter steelhead impacts from non-treaty fisheries are estimated at 0.50% compared to the 2.0% ESA limit.
Summary of Non-Treaty Fisheries Performance
As described above, the Oregon and Washington Fish and Wildlife Commissions provided policy guidance for managing non-treaty fisheries on upriver spring Chinook before and after the run-size update.
Consistent with this guidance, for fisheries scheduled to occur before the run-size update, Oregon and Washington apportioned approximately 71% of the available harvest of upriver spring Chinook to recreational fisheries and 29% to commercial fisheries. The corresponding management guidelines for these non-treaty fisheries are shown in Tables 1 and 2 (in the 282,000 run-size column).
Although the Oregon and Washington Fish and Wildlife Commissions recognized that uncertainty in run-size forecasts may, in some years, preclude fishing after the run-size update, each provided guidance on how to allocate available ESA impacts and harvest if and when the opportunity to fish after the update occurred.
o For 2010, the final run size of 315,100 afforded no opportunity for non-treaty fisheries after the update. However, if such an opportunity was available, fisheries would have been managed consistent with the management guidelines shown in the right-hand column of Table 2.
o If non-treaty fisheries could have occurred after the run-size update in 2010, the management guidelines shown in the right-hand column of Table 2 indicate that managers would have strived for a “final” apportionment of the available harvest of upriver spring Chinook of approximately 64% to recreational fisheries and 36% to commercial fisheries.
o Given the pre-update harvest by non-treaty recreational and commercial fisheries in 2010, at a 315,100 run size for upriver spring Chinook, post-update fishing opportunity likely would have been primarily afforded to commercial fisheries since recreational fisheries would have met their guideline during the pre-update period.

Table 1. 2010 Upriver Spring Chinook Catch Balance and ESA Impact Summary 1
Fishery
Catch Balance 2
ESA Impact
Actual kept
and released mortalities
States'
Pre-Update
(40% buffer) 3
Assumed run size =282,000
U.S. v
Oregon
(30% buffer) Assumed run size = 329,000
U.S. v
OregonBalance 4
Actual
Impact 5 (%)
ESA Limit
% Used

Select Area
1,485
423
494
-991
0.41
0.15
273%
Mainstem Commercial.
7,604
8,321
10,558
2,954
0.47
0.84
56%
Total
9,089
8,744
11,052
1,963
0.88
0.99
89%


Lower Columbia River Recreational
23,506
17,172
21,703
-1,803
0.83
0.83
101%
Zone 6 Recreational
3,158
2,290
2,894
-264
0.12
0.11
113%
Snake River Recreational
1,683
1,796
2,270
587
0.06
0.17
38%
Upper Columbia Fisheries 6
483
455
575
92
0.11
0.17
69%
Total
28,830
21,713
27,442
-1,388
1.07
1.10
97%






0.11 (un-allocated)
Non Treaty Total
37,919
30,457
38,494
575
1.95
2.20
89%





Treaty Total
42,168



13.38
10.80
124%





Grand total




15.33
13.00
118%

1. All data preliminary
2. Includes upriver kept and release mortalities
3. States designed pre-update season with a 40% buffer to provide additional assurance of meeting U.S. v. Oregon provisions and fairly distribute non-treaty catch in the basin
4. Compared to allowable harvest at the required U.S. v. Oregon 30% buffered run-size
5. Total impacts calculated using the highest of the Snake River or Upper Columbia fisheries
6. Includes Wanapum and Ringold fisheries



Table 2. 2010 Non-Treaty Spring Chinook Fisheries Performance
Fishery
Actual Kept Catch (All Stocks)
Actual Kept Catch and Release Mortalities
(Upriver stocks)
Actual Pre-Update Management Guideline for Upriver Stocks
Assumed run size = 282,000
Management Guideline for Upriver Stocks If Non-Treaty Fisheries Could Have Occurred Post-Update
Assumed run size = 315,100 1
Select Area
23,687
1,485
423
473
Mainstem Commercial.
9,207
7,604
8,321
11,816
Total
32,894
9,089
8,744
12,289


Lower Columbia River Recreational
29,247
23,506
17,172
17,037
Zone 6 Recreational
3,075
3,158
2,290
2,272
Snake River Recreational
1,663
1,683
1,796
1,982
Upper Columbia Fisheries 6
479
483
455
451
Total
34,464
28,830
21,713
21,742



Non Treaty Total
67,358
37,919
30,457
34,031
1 Actual allowable catch may have been constrained by available ESA impacts shown in Table 1.



Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Preliminary data

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/fish/OSCR...on_summary.pdf

__________________
"To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield."

(from Ulysses - Tennyson, 1833)

Last edited by ccw; 07-02-2010 at 09:33 PM.
ccw is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-04-2010, 03:57 PM   #2
wayout
Sturgeon
 
wayout's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 3,840
Default Re: WDFW & ODW Winter & Spring Wrap Up Info.

Hard to read this table. Tables don't paste real well on ifish.
__________________
Get Me Out of Here and Let's Go Fishing!!
wayout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2010, 04:31 PM   #3
ccw
King Salmon
 
ccw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 8,766
Default Re: WDFW & ODW Winter & Spring Wrap Up Info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wayout View Post
Hard to read this table. Tables don't paste real well on ifish.
Here's the link to the website again http://www.dfw.state.or.us/fish/OSCR...on_summary.pdf

C.W.
__________________
"To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield."

(from Ulysses - Tennyson, 1833)
ccw is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-04-2010, 05:33 PM   #4
Stick'em
King Salmon
 
Stick'em's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 12,981
Default Re: WDFW & ODW Winter & Spring Wrap Up Info.

Looks like approx. 32K fish caught in the Willy. That's pretty darn good.
__________________
Mo Feeesh!
Stick'em is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Cast to



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:21 PM.

Terms of Service
 
Page generated in 0.24131 seconds with 18 queries