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Old 05-10-2005, 08:45 AM   #1
Rakkasan
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Default Boiling food in vacuum seal bags

I was wondering if anyone has vacuum sealed fish and cooked it by boiling it with spices in the vacuum sealed bag. I know you can boile them. I was not sure on the time.

Thanks

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Old 05-10-2005, 08:57 AM   #2
shalom
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Default Re: Boiling food in vacuum seal bags

I tried to warm up some spagettie by boiling it with water in the bag while deer hunting . The water boiled for at least 10-minutes and it was still as cold as when i started . The elavation was a little high but not exstream .
I thought that as long as the water was boiling that it should have been hot in that time . I finally emptyed it into a frying pan .
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Old 05-10-2005, 11:36 AM   #3
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Default Re: Boiling food in vacuum seal bags

now you went and made me learn something. From what I've gathered so far the technique is called Sous Vide (Sue-Veed). Essentially cooking vacume packaged foods at lower temps for longer times. This came from SauteWednesday site

Here is a receip using salmon and zip lock bags if you search Sous Vide on the Internet you will find a ton on it.

Salmon cooked sous vide with fresh herbs

With wild salmon practically doubling in price from last year, it&amp;#65533;&amp;#65533;&amp;#65533;s important to treat that precious orange flesh right. Salmon meat is naturally moist, with thin layers of collagen coating each muscle fiber, which in turn gives it the flaking quality particular to fish. Unlike the collagens in beef and other meats, those in fish break down at lower temperatures - the telltale sign of a piece of overcooked salmon are the puddles of white gelatinous collagen that collect on the surface. Even though salmon is a very fatty fish, it&amp;#65533;&amp;#65533;&amp;#65533;s easily overcooked, and becomes dry and chewy. Cooking salmon a la sous vide, in a plastic Ziploc bag, lets you closely monitor the cooking time and temperature, which is essential to preserving it&amp;#65533;&amp;#65533;&amp;#65533;s rich taste and buttery texture.

This recipe relies on a subtle infusion of fresh herbs and aromatics, which are just enough to perfume the fish, but not overpower its flavor. Leaner white- fleshed fish, such as halibut or cod, give up a lot more liquid when cooked, and are especially moist and buttery when prepared this way (serves 4).

Ingredients:
1 lb fresh wild salmon filet (skin removed), cut into 4 equal pieces
1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
1 shallot, thinly sliced
4 sprigs fresh thyme
4 teaspoons olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
8 Ziploc quart size freezer bags

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Turn off heat and let sit for 15 minutes to cool. Check the water temperature with an instant read thermometer and when it reads 145 degree F, return the pot to the lowest possible burner setting, to maintain an average temperature of 145-150 degrees. This is below a simmer, and bubbles rising to the surface should be absent.

Double bag the Ziplocs so that you have 4 packages.

Place one piece of salmon in each bag, followed by a couple slices of garlic and shallots, a sprig of thyme, a teaspoon of the olive oil, and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper.

Gently massage all the ingredients into the bottom of the bag, and then fold the bag over, pressing out most of the air, and keep folding until you have a package the width of the salmon piece. Seal both of the Ziploc bags tightly. It's important to try and get most of the air out of the bag so the packages will not float to the surface of the water during cooking. You want the packages to stay submerged so that they are exposed to an even and constant source of heat.

Check the temperature of the water again, before placing the salmon packages in the water. If the temperature has risen to above 145 degrees, you can lower it by adding a glass or two of cold water. Most salmon fillets are about 1 1/2 inches thick and will only take about 4 minutes to cook (be sure to bring the salmon to room temperature before cooking).

After 4 minutes, remove one of the packages from the water, and gently press on the salmon flesh. Perfectly cooked salmon meat will separate and flake slightly when pressed, and you should be able to see to the middle of the fillet in order to gauge the doneness. While the FDA recommends cooking fish until it reaches an internal temperature of 145 degrees F., a lot of cooks prefer their salmon a bit more rare in the middle, although cooking in water at this temperature insures that the interior of the salmon will never rise above 145. At this point, you can either return the packages to the pot and cook for another minute or so, or open them and serve the salmon immediately with your favorite side dish (making sure to squeeze out all available juices from the bags). Alternately you could submerge the bags in ice water to completely halt the cooking, and simply reheat them later.
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Old 05-10-2005, 11:39 AM   #4
pearl
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Default Re: Boiling food in vacuum seal bags

Salmon in a bag might work season it up and drop it in.

We make omlettes. 2 scrambled eggs, Cubed cheese ( not shredded )bacon, onion, what ever else you want. Drop the bag in the boiling water and cook until firm.

I do three at a time on my one burner butane stove that I keep in the boat. They are pre made/mixed the night before so they are ready to go. No mess and no fuss.

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Old 05-10-2005, 11:56 AM   #5
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Default Re: Boiling food in vacuum seal bags

Wow! What a fantastic idea! I gotta check this out sometime!
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Old 05-10-2005, 06:36 PM   #6
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Default Re: Boiling food in vacuum seal bags

Pearl---you just described the PERFECT omelet. I do that myself. Even a half drunk 10 year old girl could not mess up a perfect omelet like that.----Stickfish-- Sounds like another boil in the bag, backpacking/horsepacking meal to try. Always looking for ideas like this. Shalom--It takes somewhere between 20 and 30 minutes at a boil to heat up a package of spagetti. I got too impatient the first time too.
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Old 05-11-2005, 08:55 AM   #7
StickFish
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Default Re: Boiling food in vacuum seal bags

I've also tried re-heating meals in the bags for elk/deer camp and it does take a long time. I'd say that is due to putting the whole pot of chilli in the bag. Next time I'm going to do portions in individual bags as I think it will increase the surface area that is being heated by the boiling water and decrease the cooking time. Also that way each of us can eat when we stumble into camp and not have to wait for the last one in.

My wife was pretty excited about the Sous Vide techniques so we will be trying some stuff out - especially with vegitables.

Lets see Halibut - Garlic - Salt - tab of butter - couple fresh basil leaves - a little lemon pepper - maybe a touch of Balsamic.

Or Elk Back Strap - rosemary - garlic - olive oil - some game seasoning, coulple small carrots and some red potatoe.

The omlet idea is cool - will have to try that one Pearl

Oh heck now I'm hungry and the yogart isn't going to cut it!
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Old 05-13-2005, 08:38 AM   #8
shalom
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Default Re: Boiling food in vacuum seal bags

Mcknerknekak ,
Thank you for the explataion on heating things in a bag . I never had a clue untill now . I have thought about that from time to time .
Ps. Your moniker is difficult to spell .
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