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Old 05-04-2005, 02:59 PM   #1
sturgn
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Default What is it and how do I kill it??

I have this weed that I have been trying to kill for the last couple years and it keeps reapearing and seems to be spreading, I have sprayed it with roundup and it doesnt seem to bother it at all. I end up pulling and pulling and pulling all summer long. I finally decided to come to my source for all information Ifish...

Heres some pictures, what is it and how do I kill it?


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Old 05-04-2005, 03:02 PM   #2
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Could you make your pics a little smaller so the screen doesn't scroll?
Thanks!
Hey, that weed looks SCARY!

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Old 05-04-2005, 03:06 PM   #3
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

There ya go, sorry Jennie!
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Old 05-04-2005, 03:11 PM   #4
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Think they call that "Mares Tail". Try pouring boiling water on it. I think it spreads on a Rhysome like a fern.
Could be A.F.O.S. though.
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Old 05-04-2005, 04:02 PM   #5
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Horsetail rush! yeah, it's the rhizome thing that keeps you from killing it. Try nuking it in the fall just before it goes dormant. The roots will draw the poison into themselves. Supposedly works on blackberries too!

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Old 05-04-2005, 04:46 PM   #6
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Blast it with a propane torch
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Old 05-04-2005, 05:11 PM   #7
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

I don't know the ratio for the mix of round-up being used. Try this, go with concentraced straight round-up with no water added. Make sure the concentrate has 41% or better active ingredient. The active ingredient in round-up or generic equilivants is glyphosate. All green plants depend on photo synthysis to produce food and energy. The active ingredient in round up stops this process. The weed you are trying to kill probably has an extensive root systems where it stores energy and this overcomes the effect of the round up. If you go with a higher dosage, it should kill the weed. Most store versions of round-up are very diluted and consequently may not do a real good job of killing tougher weeds.
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Old 05-04-2005, 05:16 PM   #8
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Casoron says it will kill it, have you tried that?
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Old 05-04-2005, 05:25 PM   #9
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

If you don't want anything to grow in this area, then use rock salt. Nothing will grow for a season or two.
And it's safe to use!
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Old 05-04-2005, 06:37 PM   #10
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

I have tried everything on that pest. It usually grows in soggy soil so taking care of the drainage problem is the best solution but I'm convinced you just have to keep after it forever. Almost any herbicide sprayed on it will kill it back but it ALWAYS comes back. I've heard you can grub out the rhizomes but I haven't been persistent enough on that remedy to give a firsthand result. Good luck.

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Old 05-04-2005, 06:39 PM   #11
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

You also have to remember that your neigbors may have it too and therfore you will still get it. I think the rocksalt idea is awesome. Those weeds seem to always pop up where they can easily be transported via edges of driveways, cracks etc. so rock salt baby!!!!!
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Old 05-04-2005, 06:41 PM   #12
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Quote:
If you don't want anything to grow in this area, then use rock salt.
I think that's worth a shot if you can stay away from good plants.

Kevin
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Old 05-04-2005, 09:38 PM   #13
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Looks a lot like horsetail. A master gardener told me that horsetail is very low on the evolutionary plant scale. Been around for eons. This may sound weird, but that means that its so old it isn't really affected by herbicides. Digging, pulling, and maybe that salt suggestion may be your best bets.
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Old 05-04-2005, 11:22 PM   #14
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Horsetail Learn to like it
Organic gardening recommends trimming every week or so or covering for a season with a barrier. I've hit it with round-up and crossbow in astoria and only fazed it. Ask this guy Bubl, Chip [chip.bubl@oregonstate.edu] , he is Columbia County's extension agent, and please let me know the answer. I am a master gardener and don't know. It's in my garden too. Caseron(dicribinol) maybe, read the label, telar and oust are also mentioned but you may need a license for these. Choke it out with grass

This is from wisconsin
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Biology and Control of Field Horsetail
(Equisetum arvensis L., Horsetail Family)
Jerry Doll
Introduction

Field horsetail is a particularly trouble-some weed in many parts of North America, Canada, and Europe due to its prolific rhizome and tuber system. This plant is native to both North America and Europe and is one of only a few Equisetum survivors from the dinosaur era. Many of horsetails ancestors grew as prehistoric trees and contributed greatly to the formation of coal beds (Mitich, 1992).

Horsetail is also known as scouring-rush and plants have been used to scour churns and pans, as fine sandpaper, and to polish metal (Mitich, 1992). The furrowed stems are structurally reinforced by silica grains, accounting for these uses. Horsetail is a survivor in every sense of the word and plants grow in many habitats. For unknown reasons, horsetail infestations are becoming more common in Wisconsin.
Description

Field horsetail is a perennial with a spreading rhizome system that produces numerous shoots and tubers. The rhizomes are dark brown or blackish, 3 to 5 mm in diameter and covered with brownish hairs that give them a felt-like feel; rhizome internodes are approximately 4 to 5 inches apart. Rhizomes grow vertically to 6 feet deep and horizontally to depths of 10 to 20 inches. The horizontal rhizomes branch freely, produce numerous shoots and form rounded tubers about 0.5 inch in diameter either singly or in pairs.

Plants produce two types of stems. The fertile (reproductive) stems appear in the early spring and are whitish to light brown, unbranched, hollow, 8 mm in diameter, cylindrical, leafless, jointed, and 6 to 12 inches long (Fig. 1b). Each stem section (joint) is ridged, rough textured and surrounded by a short papery sheath (modified leaves) with 8 to 12 teeth (Fig. 1a and b).

These stem sections are easily pulled apart and can be rejoined like sections of a stove pipe. The tips of fertile stems end in a yellowish to brownish spore-producing cone (called a strobilus), 0.5 to 1.25 inch long (Fig. 1c). Fertile stems wither and die once spores have been produced, usually by early summer.

Sterile (vegetative) stems emerge later than the fertile stems and are markedly different. They look like miniature pine trees with their plume-like branches. This appearance also explains the plants common name: horsetail. Sterile stems are green, erect or somewhat prostrate, 6 to 24 inches tall and are composed of slender, grooved, hollow joints, 1 to 1.5 mm in diameter (Fig. 1A). The middle and upper joints have 6 to 12 needle-like branches that are 2 to 4 inches long, jointed but not hollow, and 3- or 4-angled and with blackened tips. The stems and branches are surrounded by a small, toothed sheath (Fig. 1d) at each node.
Habitat and Biology

Field horsetail thrives in many habitats and is just at home in wet, poorly drained areas of fields and grasslands; wet meadows; streams and other sites with high water tables as in well drained sites in farm fields, orchards and nursery crops, and in sites with sandy or gravelly soil such as along roadsides, railroad tracks and beaches. In general, horsetail appears most commonly in acidic and wet soil conditions.

Buds and tubers on the rhizomes are capable of reaching the surface from great depths. Single rhizome segments 0.5 inch long planted 6 inches deep easily produced new plants (Cloutier and Watson, 1985). Plants can only tolerate shade for short periods unless they have sizable quantities of carbohydrates stored in the established rhizomes. Tuber production drops rapidly as shade levels increase; conversely tuber production is optimized when plants grow in full sunlight. Horsetail responds to potassium and its growth is optimal in soils with high available K levels (Andersson and Ludegardh, 1999b).

Field horsetail never produces flowers or seeds; rather, it reproduces by spores, horizontal rhizomes and tubers. Little information on the frequency or conditions required for establishment via spores was found in the literature. We do know that fertile stems are seldom observed in cropped land. Fertile stems develop early in the spring and a single spore cone can release millions of minute spores (0.1 mm across). These are viable for about 48 hr after being released and germinate only in damp soil (Royer and Dickinson, 1999). "Sporelings" are very small and any soil tillage or herbicide application at this stage should destroy most if not all potential horsetail plants. Thus, spores are unlikely to be an important means of horsetail propagation, particularly in cropped land.

Horsetail rhizomes extend for long distances and are often 3 feet or more below the ground surface. Mitch (1992) says it well: "Horsetails upper growths are like surfaced periscopes, giving no indication of the industrious bulk of underground parts." Rhizomes send up numerous aboveground shoots of two different types at various times of the year. Tubers are primarily food storage organs but develop into new plants if removed from the rhizome.

Sterile shoots of horsetail (those that look like small pine trees) appear in early May and reach a maximum growth rate in July, maximum shoot height in August, and maximum shoot number in September (Marshall, 1985). Rhizome growth accelerates rapidly between June and July and peaks in October. Tubers appear in July and increase in weight until a killing frost occurs.
Horsetail Importance and Management in Agricultural Settings

Field and Vegetable Crops Prevention is always preferable to control. Movement of rhizomes or tubers on tillage implements is a common means of starting new populations. Simulations done to predict the rate of spread estimate that six years after introducing horse-tail into an agricultural field, the weed will infest 2.5 acres (Cloutier and Watson, 1985)! Check field edges and low areas of fields periodically for possible horsetail infestations. The best means of controlling this weed is through quarantine and mechanical and cultural methods while it infests only small areas. Cultural practices such as improved drainage and adequate lime and fertilization programs will help suppress horsetail infestations in any habitat. Applying nitrogen fertilizer to grass crops is helpful because horsetail responds minimally to nitrogen while grass crops respond quickly and significantly. This gives the crop a highly competitive advantage over horsetail because this weed is shade sensitive (Andersson and Ludegardh, 1999a).

The impact of field horsetail on crops is highly correlated to the competitive ability of the crop. This weed seldom has economic impacts in vigorous, well-managed corn, soybeans or small grains. However, it competes vigorously with slow growing and short statured vegetable crops and can become a dominant monoculture in landscape plantings. Most producers succeed in harvest-ing productive crops by incorporating tillage, competitive crops and, in the case of vegetable, mulches into their management system.

In Finland, horsetail populations decreased noticeably between the 1960s and 1990s due to improved small grain cultivation techniques and more competitive varieties (Ervio and Salonen, 1987). Horseweeds extensive and deep rhizome system means that tillage and cultivation alone only destroy the top growth and delay reestablishment. Field crop producers who practice a reasonable annual tillage program and maintain a competitive crop in an infested field for several years might eradicate horsetail.

There are few herbicides that affect field horsetail in field crops. Primisulfuron (Beacon) can give reasonable burning action on horsetail in corn but preplant tillage followed by in-row cultivation is often as effective. Repeated applications of MCPA reportedly reduce horsetail infestations and would be safe to perennial grasses such as bluegrass and pasture grasses. Thorough preplant tillage and narrow row soybeans probably offer the best horsetail suppression in this crop.

Livestock Poisoning. While medicinal uses of field horsetail are reported, plants can be poisonous to animals and cause a disease known as "equisetosis." Many substances (including aconitic acid, equistitie, nicotine, palmitic acid and silica) have been associated with animal poisoning, but the causal agent is believed to be thiaminase, either alone or in conjunction with one or more additional toxin (Hill and Foland, 1986).

Horses are particularly sensitive and can be killed if large amounts of horsetail are consumed. Hay containing 20% or more horsetail produces symptoms in horses in two to five weeks. Symptoms include unthriftiness followed by weakness, "staggers," nervousness, faulty vision, and difficulty in turning. In advanced stages, horses may "go down" and not be able to rise. Such animals are nervous and make frantic efforts to stand (Hill and Foland, 1986). The appetite remains normal until death. In late stages, muscular rigidity and constipation may be observed. In fatal cases, death is preceded by quiescence and coma. The immediate removal of contaminated forage brings about rapid recovery. Keep poisoned animals out of rain and adverse weather. Cattle, sheep, and goats are rarely poisoned. Always consult a veterinarian if poisoning is suspected.

Presence and Control in Non-cropland Horsetail is becoming more common in non-cultivated sites such as roadsides, flower beds, lawns, ornamental plantings and sandy beaches. Even if repeated tillage could be done, it may not be successful. Horseweeds extensive and deep rhizome system means that tillage and cultivation only destroy the top growth and delay reestablishment. The density of many perennial weeds can be greatly reduced with a season of repeated tillage. However, weed scientists in Canada hand-weeded an area with horsetail 16 times during one summer. The following year these plots looked identical to the check plot (Cloutier and Watson, 1985)! Even glyphosate fails to control horsetail. A home owner reported using glyphosate three times in one season to kill horsetail: the next year the site sported a dense monoculture of horsetail.

The Weed Control Manual 2000 (Curran, et al., 2000) lists only two herbicides for field horsetail control in non-cropland, ornamentals/woody plantings, small fruits and deciduous tree fruits: diclobenil (Casoron) for all of the above sites/crops; and clorsulfuron (Telar) or sulfometuron (Oust) for non-crop areas. No references on the long term effects of these herbicides on horsetail were found. Follow label guidelines carefully if either of these herbicides is used.
Summary

It is easy to recognize this perennial weed because in the vegetative phase field horsetail looks like a small pine tree. The reproductive phase is also very distinctive with the hollow stems that pull apart like stove pipe with a spore head on the top. Field horsetail suppression (and possibly eradication) will only result if the appropriate mix of practices is done as a sustained effort for several seasons.
References

Andersson, T.N. and B. Ludegardh 1999a. Growth of field horsetail (Equisetum arvense) under low light and low nitrogen conditions. Weed Sci. 47: 41-46.

Andersson, T.N. and B. Ludegardh 1999b. Field horsetail (Equisetum arvense) - effects of potassium under different light and nitrogen conditions. Weed Sci. 47: 47-54.

Cloutier, D. and A. Watson. 1985. Growth and regeneration of field horsetail (Equisetum arvense). Weed Sci. 33: 358-365.

Curran, W. et al. 2000. Editors. Weed Control Manual 2000. Meister Pub. Co. Willoughby, OH. 562p.

Ervio, L-R. and J. Salonen. 1987. Changes in the weed population of spring cereals in Finland. Ann. Agric. Fenn. 26: 201-206.

Hill, R.J. and D. Foland 1986. Equisetum. In: Poisonous Plants of Pennsylvania. Dept. of Agric., Bureau of Plant Industry. Harrisburg, PA. Pages 67-68.

Marshall, G. 1985. Studies on the growth and development of field horsetail (Equisetum arvense). Weed Sci. Soc. Amer. Annual Meeting. Abstract no. 179.

Mitich, L. 1992. Intriguing World of Weeds: Horsetail. Weed Technol. 6: 779-781.

Royer, F. and R. Dickinson. 1999. Common horsetail. In: Weeds of the Northern U.S. and Canada. Univ. of Alberta Press. Edmonton, Canada. Pages 216-217.

May, 2001

All Pages Copyright 2002 Board of Regents University of Wisconsin System. If you have trouble accessing this page, require this information in an alternative format, or wish to request a reasonable accommodation because of a disability contact: Amy Gibbs

The Weed Control Manual 2000 (Curran, et al., 2000) lists only two herbicides for field horsetail control in non-cropland, ornamentals/woody plantings, small fruits and deciduous tree fruits: diclobenil (Casoron) for all of the above sites/crops; and clorsulfuron (Telar) or sulfometuron (Oust) for non-crop areas. No references on the long term effects of these herbicides on horsetail were found. Follow label guidelines carefully if either of these herbicides is used.
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Old 05-05-2005, 07:14 AM   #15
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Quote:
Casoron says it will kill it, have you tried that?
Casaron doesn't kill,it prevents seeds from germinating. You need to kill it first,then use Casaron to keep it from coming back.
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Old 05-05-2005, 07:19 AM   #16
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

If its in an area thats isolated from stuff you don't want to kill,I'd use Noxall. Its a granual or liquid that basically kills the plant,then sterilizes the soil. One application will usually keep an area weed free for up to a year.

Its not like Roundup where it breaks down in the soil,thats why you need to be careful around other plants or grass.
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Old 05-05-2005, 08:27 AM   #17
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Since this is an area that you are trying to keep clear and you aren't concerned with other plants in the area, here is the low-budget solution:

1. A quart of cheap, strong vinegar with a couple tablespoons of liquid soap(In the spirit of ifish, let's make it Lemon Joy). Spray the mixture on the foliage. The soap will make the vinegar stick to the plant and the acidic vinegar will kill it! Stinky stuff, but it will work and it is cheap.

2. Spread rock salt in the soil to sterilize the soil. This solution goes back to biblical times and will work. The more you put down the longer the soil will remain sterile.
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Old 05-05-2005, 08:41 AM   #18
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

You guys are awsome, I will try the viniger and rocksalt routine! I really dont want to put alot of chemicles out there.

Thansk!
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Old 05-05-2005, 09:15 AM   #19
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

So he's going to have to nuke the site from orbit... Its the only way to be sure.

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Old 05-05-2005, 09:21 AM   #20
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

lol yeah NUKES!!! I have been reading up on this stuff its survived for a very long time, thats why its so hard to kill I guess. They haev found it in fossels from the dinasour age. If the ice age and falling comets cant kill it I will just have to learn how to live with it! But Im not giving up without a fight!
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Old 05-05-2005, 10:32 AM   #21
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Just be aware of leeching. Will the rain carry high concentrations to good plants?

BTW you should only cut these . Picking them forces them to branch out into more plants. Built in self defense mechanism.
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Old 05-05-2005, 07:48 PM   #22
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Killing weeds is a chore!

We are out in the country. We use to use a 3 gallon backpack sprayer to hit the weeds on our 1/2 acre. We'd spray the weeds every month or two.

I have changed the routine over the last few years. I use a hand carrier 1 gallon sprayer. With a mixture of crossbow, round-up and class act all purchased from the farm store in Canby. Carring a 1 gallon is easier than luggin the 3 gallon one.

Once a week or so, I make a trip around the barkdust area right before I edge and mow the lawn. I figure I use less because I get the weeds while they are tiny. The gallon sprayer hangs on the wall in the garage. The gallon goes a long long ways.

Spraying the weeds when they are tiny keeps the barkdust areas looking nice.

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Old 05-05-2005, 09:44 PM   #23
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

Hey, that looks like something from the movie Body Snatc..."oh no".."NO!!!"...."mmmppphhhh"................ I think you should leave it alone and let it grow.
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Old 05-05-2005, 10:37 PM   #24
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Default Re: What is it and how do I kill it??

i say trim it up a lil bit ..and go bonsi with it
if you dont kill it with all that has been posted
i would say you have a new hedg
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Old 05-06-2005, 03:54 PM   #25
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Stake out a goat!
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